Whistleblower alleges corruption in LIO court case

first_imgCrime & Courts | State GovernmentWhistleblower alleges corruption in LIO court caseDecember 17, 2015 by Zachariah Hughes, KSKA Share:The state seal at the Anchorage Legislative Information Office. (Photo by Jeremy Hsieh/KTOO)The state court heard oral arguments Wednesday in a case involving the contentious lease on the Legislative Information Office in downtown Anchorage.The plaintiff, Jim Gottstein, owns the building next to the LIO and alleges financial improprieties in the lease agreement between lawmakers and the property’s landlord, which could invalidate the space’s 10-year lease.Gottstein also argues that as a whistleblower, he should be compensated 10 percent of what’s saved if the lease is terminated.Attorneys for the legislature and the building landlord don’t dispute that there were financial overages associated with the LIO building. But they say the case is not a referendum on impropriety in the building’s development and lease. Instead, the legislature’s attorney Kevin Cuddy told the judge that the claims were invalid because Gottstein knew about the financial excesses but waited for more than a year to file his claim.“Instead of taking appropriate action, raising these questions to Legislative Affairs Agency when something could be done, he decided to get a few dollars on his own and try and get some payments for construction and related work, and then sue the Legislative Affairs Agency and the other defendants,” Cuddy said in court.The lawsuit is separate from ongoing legislative decisions about whether to relocate from the LIO to the state-owned Atwood building a few blocks away, but both touch on accusations of wasted money and government corruption. The Legislative Council is scheduled to meet Saturday at 9 a.m. to take up the issue.Superior Court Judge Patrick McKay is considering the case and weighing next steps. He said more than once that the topic of the LIO building is a “moving target,” with the Saturday meeting of the Legislative Council likely to affect the status of the lawsuit.Share this story:last_img read more

Read more

Alaska House passes COVID-19 relief bill; Senate has one more day to approve

first_imgCoronavirus | Juneau | State GovernmentAlaska House passes COVID-19 relief bill; Senate has one more day to approveMay 19, 2020 by Andrew Kitchenman, KTOO and Alaska Public Media Share:House Minority Leader Lance Pruitt, R-Anchorage, on Monday, May 18, 2020, in Juneau, Alaska. Lawmakers gaveled in for the last few days of their regular session to pass a COVID-19 aid bill. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/KTOO)The Alaska House adjourned its session on Tuesday after passing a bill, 38 to 1, to approve a plan to spend federal COVID-19 relief.The Senate passed its own version of the bill, but with the House adjourned, the Senate will have to pass the House version for it to take effect soon. That vote could be on Wednesday, the deadline under the state constitution to end the session.Rep. Lance Pruitt, an Anchorage Republican, said lawmakers put aside their political differences to support the measure.“I think everyone could have seen something different,” Pruitt said of legislators’ priorities for the relief funding. “But in the end, we recognize that the importance is that Alaskans get the money that they need right now to ensure that their businesses are maintained; their communities can provide the services that they need to the individuals that are affected; and that Alaskans can make it through this challenge together.”The bill provides roughly $1.1 billion to communities, small businesses and others under a plan initially developed by Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s administration. The plan was approved by the Legislative Budget and Audit Committee on May 11. The administration and most committee members wanted the committee vote to be sufficient to send the money out.But a Juneau resident filed a lawsuit alleging the process was unconstitutional and that the full Legislature must vote on it. Legislative leaders called lawmakers back to Juneau to ratify the committee’s action.The Legislative Budget and Audit Committee considered what to do about Dunleavy’s plan for three weeks. During that time, other House committees held meetings and heard testimony from municipal leaders and others about the plan. And the administration made changes to the plan, including addressing some of the concerns that were raised in the committee meetings.Anchorage Democratic Rep. Geran Tarr said the time it took to pass the plan led to improvements.For example, business owners were concerned that the administration’s original plan for $290 million in small business relief would have been a loan program.“Now it’s a grant program,” Tarr said. “That’s huge, and that is a huge change.”Administration officials have said the first of $568.6 million in payments to communities could start soon after the Legislature passes the bill and the state receives information it’s requested from communities.The U.S. Congress may pass more relief. If that happens, it’s likely there would have to be a special session for lawmakers to decide how to deal with those funds.Share this story:last_img read more

Read more

Reunion wreckage confirmed from MH370

first_img whatsapp More From Our Partners Russell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgInstitutional Investors Turn To Options to Bet Against AMCvaluewalk.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comWhite House Again Downplays Fourth Possible Coronvirus Checkvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.com‘The Love Boat’ captain Gavin MacLeod dies at 90nypost.com Express KCS Share A piece of a wing that washed up on a beach on the Indian Ocean island of Reunion last week has been confirmed as part of the wreckage of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370. The flight disappeared from radar screens on 8 March while en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. The Boeing 777 was carrying 239 passengers and crew when it veered off course. whatsapp Thursday 6 August 2015 5:50 am Show Comments ▼ Reunion wreckage confirmed from MH370 Tags: NULLlast_img read more

Read more

Pharmalot, Pharmalittle: Brexit, schmexit. Glaxo invests $360 million in the UK

first_img About the Author Reprints PharmalotPharmalot, Pharmalittle: Brexit, schmexit. Glaxo invests $360 million in the UK Alex Hogan/STAT Hello, everyone, and how are you today? We are just fine and managing to keep cool, despite the balmy temperatures in our part of the world. We hope you are doing the same. Meanwhile, we will be stepping out to participate in a forum for pharma types, so please forgive us for sporadic posting. And now, on to the main event. Here are your tidbits. Hope you have a smashing day and, as always, keep us in mind when something juicy pops up.Despite the recent Brexit vote, GlaxoSmithKline plans to invest $360 million into its United Kingdom manufacturing network. The drug maker operates nine sites employing approximately 6,000 people. The investment will fund construction of an aseptic sterile plant for making new and existing drugs, as well as another facility for producing active ingredients for respiratory medicines.An Arkansas legislator says Pfizer has no standing to complain that state prison officials will use its drug in executions, the Associated Press reports. Arkansas obtained vecuronium bromide for use in executions, even though the company doesn’t want its drugs used for that purpose. Representative Doug House says the state obtained the drug legally, “fair and square.” Pfizer’s only complaint might be with a vendor that sold the drug to the state.advertisement By Ed Silverman July 27, 2016 Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. [email protected] center_img The US Food and Drug Administration continues to reduce its backlog of generic drug applications, Regulatory Focus tells us. The agency slashed its pile of abbreviated new drug applications by about 500 applications in the first six months of 2016. Meanwhile, the agency also approved 315 more ANDAs over that same time period and sent 66 more complete responses letters — or rejections — to drug makers.A closely watched treatment for Alzheimer’s disease fell short in a late-stage trial, marking the latest setback in a field marked by years of failure, STAT reports. The drug, which is being developed by TauRx, failed to do better than a placebo in improving patient scores on tests of cognitive and physical function, according to data presented early Wednesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto.advertisement Tags BrexitGlaxoSmithKlinePfizer Ed Silverman @Pharmalot The FDA followed through on plans to upgrade warnings for the fluoroquinolone antibiotics by limiting their use to patients with no alternatives. The antibiotics include Johnson & Johnson’s Levaquin, Bayer’s Cipro extended-release tablets, and Merck’s Avelox. The agency had already added a black box warning in 2008 about the increased risk of tendinitis in which the tissue connecting muscle to bone becomes inflamed.Eli Lilly chief executive John Lechleiter, who has headed the drug maker since 2008, will retire at the end of the year and be succeeded by senior vice president David Ricks on Jan. 1.Tokai Pharmaceuticals ended a clinical trial of an experimental prostate cancer drug after an independent committee concluded it is unlikely to meet its goal of improving progression-free survival for patients, the Boston Globe writes. Its stock dropped 78 percent.Recro Pharma says an intravenous version of its lead painkiller was successful in the first of two pivotal late-stage trials, Reuters says, noting the news boosted shares by 50 percent in after-market trading.Lupin, which is India’s third-largest drug maker, is in talks with Japan’s Astellas and Shionogi to buy their off-patent medicines, the Economic Times tells us.GlaxoSmithKline bought global rights to an experimental drug from Johnson & Johnson for up to $230 million, raising a bet on a new generation of biotech medicines for severe asthma, Reuters says.The FDA identified “significant deviations” from manufacturing standards a facility in Denmark operated by ALK-Abello, InPharma Technologist notes.last_img read more

Read more

Using a collective ‘virtuous cycle’ to break the pandemic

first_img Medical schools teach students a four-part “virtuous cycle” in which one step positively reinforces the next: Assess the patient. Implement a therapeutic plan. Assess the patient’s response. Revise the therapeutic plan as needed.In an emergency department, this cycle can be completed in minutes. In the cancer clinic, it can take months.Mastering the virtuous cycle is understood to be a central measure of medical competence. Yet when the patient is not one person but an entire society, this cycle is fractured and ad hoc in ways that would make any patient demand a new doctor.advertisement Isaac S. Kohane Clinicians care for Covid-19 patients in a makeshift ICU in January at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, Calif. Mario Tama/Getty Images Backed by Google, epidemiologists launch a sweeping Covid-19 data platform We’ve all been witness to — and victims of — this failure in the pandemic. The superb accomplishments of therapeutic medicine cannot address the population-based issues that Covid-19 has raised. But we can use the virtuous cycle as a way to switch gears to employ approaches drawn from disciplines like public health.For the first step, assessment, doctors were unable to define the most basic clinical course of severe Covid-19, despite billions of dollars invested to achieve interoperable electronic health records over the past 30 years. It took clinicians and researchers months to identify the interplay of inflammation, coagulopathy, and cardiac dysfunction, and then only through a jury-rigged combination of conference calls and small studies shared through disparate nuggets of preprints.advertisement @zittrain [email protected] About the Authors Reprints Related: In retrospect, the clinical course of Covid-19 would have been plain to see from any systematic study of the experiences within dozens, then hundreds, of hospitals treating patients with the disease in China, Europe, and then in the U.S. early in 2020. This failure of assessment was multiscale: Medical and public health establishments had neither the mechanisms, governance, nor institutional will share these clinical data in real time at the national level, let alone internationally. The just-unveiled Global.health platform may offer some promise. Funded by corporate and nonprofit foundations, it features data on Covid-19 cases from multiple health research institutions and hospitals. It has grown from a small volunteer network into a comparatively substantial effort.For step 2, implement a therapeutic plan, we have witnessed the staggeringly rapid and welcome development of new classes of vaccines that are effective against Covid-19, and their being vetted and delivered an unprecedented nine months from when the pathogen was identified. This achievement is all the more notable because it sets the stage for even more timely vaccine development for future threats. Related:center_img Tags Coronaviruspatientsphysicianspublic health ‘A full court press’: Banking on tech backup, CDC launches nationwide VaccineFinder tool There is a fundamental gap in the way we relate individual health care to broader public health that inhibits our ability to respond to emerging health threats. Our analogy to the virtuous cycle of therapy shows that we’re missing people in crucial but unrecognized roles — an assemblage of clinical teams writ large, whose primary responsibilities are not to individual patients but to the patients of their health care systems. These teams would be tightly linked with regional and national teams to assess what is happening with a novel infectious disease, and then strategically implement responses, measure the results, and revise accordingly. In that way, insights would be shared with the thousands of health care providers suffering under the weight of the pandemic — and demonstrate a path for amelioration of other community-wide public health challenges.We need experienced, coordinated teams of health professionals and analysts across local, regional, and national care systems whose primary job is to evaluate data rapidly and with full understanding of the limitations of data and idiosyncrasies required for reliable interpretation.Public health systems elsewhere in the world may offer instruction. In early 2020, for example, critical care doctors were surrounded in their ICUs by Covid-19 patients — all sick, many dying. These intensivists were learning that their standard therapies for respiratory illnesses usually weren’t effective. Many small trials were launched with the best of intentions, but systematic, large-scale trials to see beyond the individual details of each case and assess the effectiveness of treatments more broadly were scarce.In this context, jarring in its unexpectedness, appeared a June 2020 preprint from researchers in the United Kingdom reporting results from a well-designed clinical trial called RECOVERY, which at the time included more than 6,000 Covid-19 patients. This trial showed that treating patients with 6 milligrams daily of dexamethasone for up to 10 days sharply decreased deaths from Covid-19.The success of the RECOVERY trial reflected its approach: Investigators dismantled bureaucratic obstacles and streamlined ponderous processes, including those of data sharing and aggregation. As the RECOVERY team’s Martin Landray told the BMJ, “What we are seeing is what happens when people are empowered and motivated.” Implicit in this comment is that this performance could not happen routinely.New health teams aimed at implementing a virtuous therapeutic cycle at a regional and national scale will need infrastructure for continual monitoring of health and treatment that is readily within our reach technologically but has so far been thwarted by sociopolitical and cultural considerations. Even if this infrastructure was present, the governance, expertise, and familiarity with the required planning and analyses to ensure that these teams would be successful are missing.They could take a page from emergency room resuscitation, for which clinicians have recognized the importance of defining responsible teams and rehearsing again and again in so-called mock codes the full virtuous cycle required for this potentially lifesaving process.Even the most talented and committed doctors cannot properly respond to a pandemic by ministering to one patient at a time. Individual health requires public health, and those engaged with the latter have been underfunded and untended for too long. The good news is that there are some clear, simple, and, in the larger scheme, inexpensive steps that can be taken to begin shoring up public health in the U.S. The bad news is that we have time and again failed to heed even the most basic lessons to establish the virtuous therapeutic cycle in this area, instead counting on raw luck to avoid the ravages of a pandemic.It’s time to break an emerging pandemic cycle with a collective, therapeutic one.Isaac Kohane is professor and founding chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School. Jonathan Zittrain is professor of international law and professor of computer science at Harvard University and co-founder of its Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. By Isaac S. Kohane and Jonathan Zittrain March 2, 2021 Reprints @zakkohane Jonathan Zittrain First OpinionUsing a collective ‘virtuous cycle’ to break the pandemic Yet now, with the delivery of these vaccines, authorities are stumbling badly. Millions of available doses have yet to be injected, and each delayed injection adds to continued and — with new variants emerging — increased transmission of Covid-19.Independent of the disorganization and lack of planning at the national level (and until recently the unapologetic forswearing of any responsibility there) some of our most feted academic health centers had multiple false starts with articulating and implementing vaccine distribution. The IT infrastructure required to track vaccinations and any adverse effects has had to be developed in extremis because there is no pre-existing software available at the right scale.The assessment of step 2’s therapeutic intervention in step 3 is, unfortunately and unsurprisingly, no better than the initial assessment called for in step 1. There’s simply no sophisticated dashboard by which policymakers and others seeking a bird’s-eye view can understand the impact of the interventions that have fitfully been attempted.The last part of the cycle, revising the therapeutic plan based on how the patient is responding, simply hasn’t been possible given the neglect of the earlier parts of the cycle.Moreover, viewing the population as merely a sum of individual patients rather than a whole can miss the forest for the trees. Karthik Dinakar of The Chelsea Project, a nonprofit program to reduce the spread of Covid-19 in the working-class city of Chelsea, Mass., points out that there can and should be a conception of community risk distinct from individual risk. In Chelsea, the life expectancy is 73 years for men and 75 year for women, lower than the national average of 76 years for men and 81 years for women. The highest-risk population, according to the state’s vaccine prioritization, amounts to only about 1,500 people over age 75. “The vast majority of deaths in the city have been in the 40-55 range because of occupational risk and overcrowded housing,” Dinaker told us by email. The authoritative status conferred on the individual clinician’s lens prioritizes risk scores based on an “average” individual, without regard for the transmission and infection dynamics that are specific to a community, such as occupational risks and overcrowded housing. linkedin.com/in/zittrain/ last_img read more

Read more

Debt-burdened Canadians unprepared to cope with sudden illness

first_img Facebook LinkedIn Twitter A significant number of Canadians who hold debt would struggle to cope with the unexpected loss of their income, according to new research. A recent survey commissioned by TD Insurance reveals that 39 per cent of Canadians surveyed have no idea how they would pay for their expenses if they had no income for six months — a figure that rose to 44 per cent for those under the age of 35. RBC Insurance clients to receive personalized support New website aims to match consumers with insurance products Related news New CI insurance product designed for younger clientele IE Staff Keywords Critical illness insurance Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Nearly 70 per cent of respondents reported having “some” or “a lot” of debt. A majority of those with the most debt — 60 per cent — don’t know what they would do to pay their expenses in the event of a sudden illness. “Personal circumstances, particularly loss of income due to critical illness, are often completely unpredictable,” said Anna Kavanagh, vice president at TD Insurance. “The last thing you want to be worried about if you have a health emergency is your finances. Obtaining the right insurance coverage, paired with saving and maintaining manageable consumer debt, will help ease the financial burden brought about by a sudden illness.” When asked, respondents reported they would need an average of $45,609 in savings to cover all expenses over the course of a year — just below the national average pre-tax salary as reported by Statistics Canada. Those with children reported they would need an average of $53,438. Interestingly the amount of savings required varies considerably among provinces. While statistics show that one in two men and one in three women in Canada will suffer a critical illness before age 65, an increasing number is expected to make full recoveries. These findings are from an Ipsos Reid online poll conducted between September 18 and 22, on behalf of TD Insurance. A sample of 1,000 Canadians from Ipsos’ Canadian online panel was interviewed. The poll is accurate to within +/- 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, had all Canadian adults been polled.last_img read more

Read more

Majority of Australians Support Limits on Artificial Intelligence and Facial Recognition Technology in Australia

first_imgMajority of Australians Support Limits on Artificial Intelligence and Facial Recognition Technology in Australia Australia InstituteThe key measures in the Australian Human Rights Commission ‘Human Rights and Technology’ report released Thursday are strongly endorsed by the Australian public, according to new research.A poll of 1,100 Australians conducted by Essential Research for the Australia Institute’s Centre for Responsible Technology finds majority support for the key measures recommended in the report:Key findings:Majority of Australians (55%) support a pause on Facial Recognition Technology in Australia until safeguards are in place, only 15% opposeVast majority of Australians (62%) support requiring a human to have oversight and accountability for all automated government decisions, only 12% opposeSix in ten Australians (60%) require all artificial intelligence to comply with anti-discrimination laws in Australia, 13% oppose“What this research shows is the Australian public is ready to have the conversation about the way technology is developing in Australia,” said Peter Lewis, Director of the Australia Institute’s Centre for Responsible Technology.“The public have witnessed countries like China where state video surveillance controls citizens with a social credit rating system and the USA where the pursuit of profit positions people as crash test dummies and it is clear they want something different.“Placing an immediate pause on the development of facial recognition technology in Australia will allow for safeguards to be developed that embed personal privacy and non-discrimination into the code of Australian artificial intelligence.“This is an opportunity to create a uniquely Australian tech industry, where our liberal-democratic values creates fairer and more effective technology.“Like the Swiss with their watches and the Danes with their furniture, Australian artificial intelligence could be recognised for its design excellence when it comes to AI.“This is a great opportunity for the government to embrace a long-term plan for the local tech industry.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AI, artificial intelligence, Australia, Australia Institute, Australian, Australian Human Rights Commission, China, Commission, director, Government, Human Rights, industry, intelligence, research, surveillance, technologylast_img read more

Read more

Meet Hunter Sherraden, student-employee of the year

first_imgCU Boulder has several thousand student employees who perform countless services with enthusiasm, dedication, and initiative. The University community depends on their contributions for the efficient and effective operation of CU Boulder. Each year we recognize students who have demonstrated exemplary work, choosing one Student Employee of the Year. Join us in celebrating the rest of the 2021-22 Student Employee of the Year Nominees.Congratulations to our Student Employee of the Year Hunter Sherraden!About HunterYear: Undergraduate Student Major: Integrative PhysiologyHunter was nominated by Abbey Strusz, Erica Schomer and Brie Jutte Waterman from New Student and Family Programs, where he serves as a Journey Leader Mentor. Hunter will ask the hard questions. Hunter will bring his concerns to his supervisors and be ready to brainstorm solutions or will come up with ideas for the solutions already. Read more about HunterPer his nominators, “Hunter represents the best of CU Boulder and has been a huge asset to our team in the last year. Hunter is a relational leader who challenges our team of students and professional staff and peers to do better. Hunter will notice an issue or inconsistency with the way the office is executing a task, and rather than staying quiet or not saying anything, Hunter will ask the hard questions. Hunter will bring his concerns to his supervisors and be ready to brainstorm solutions or will come up with ideas for the solutions already. For example, when the team was really struggling after handling a lot of angry parent phone calls after COVID-19 first hit, Hunter was able to let us know that many on the team were struggling and feeling underappreciated. He advocated for his peers and was able to speak on behalf of some of the students who were not brave enough to share their concerns with us. As a result of his advocacy, the Program Coordinators were able to advocate to their director and help get a pay increase for the Journey Leader Mentor position this year to compensate the students for the additional roles and responsibilities they were being asked to take on due to the pandemic impacts.Another example of Hunter bringing his ideas and innovation to the table is his feedback on the online orientation for students. He noticed some gaps in information that we were sharing with students about Health and Wellness and took his knowledge from his own major in Integrated Physiology and his passion for Public Health and provided us with a report of ideas to add into the Online Experience.One of Hunter’s accomplishments over the past year has been his work on our student leader orientation presentation called Being a Buff, which is a peer-to-peer presentation that our Journey Leaders present to our new incoming students at orientation during Fall and Spring Welcomes. They share information about important campus resources, the best study places on campus, how to navigate the Buff Bus, and much more! This presentation has gone under many iterations and edits and Hunter always volunteers to contribute to the ever-changing format of the presentation. He knows and values how crucial this information is and knows that having the platform to share this knowledge with up to 7,000 new incoming students is an important responsibility. He is also always one of the first people to volunteer to present and is a strong public speaker who is willing to share his own personal story and be vulnerable with the students about his own experiences as a new student on campus.During the pandemic, the Journey Leader Mentors work shifted to remote. We had to find a way to communicate with the students as they came on and off shift, so we created an “On the Clock” chat on Microsoft Teams that we add our students to each day as they come on and off the shift. After a few months the chat was loading slowly, and we all started to notice our Teams chat was suffering. Hunter used his critical thinking and problem-solving skills to suggest that each month we make a new “On the Clock” chat that way the chat would be faster and not get bogged down with the excess chats and GIFS. This system has been incredibly helpful and is what we still currently use today. Hunter also used his skills in leadership and professionalism as he has learned to help coach others on shift during this remote time. Some of the newer Journey Leader Mentors needed extra support and help navigating the systems and learning everything, especially while being remote. Hunter uses his leadership skills and professionalism to give constructive feedback and support to our newer staff members while he is on shift with them.For all of these reasons and many more, we truly believe Hunter is an exceptional student employee of the year.”Congratulations to our first runner-up Max Gannett!About MaxYear: Undergraduate Major: Information ScienceMax was nominated by Erin Penberthy in Career Services where he works as an Embedded Student Assistant for CMCI. Max is accountable, positive, thoughtful and engaged. He does not just do what is asked of him but continuously steps up to take on more projects, to learn new skills and to be a positive liaison to Career Services. Read more about MaxPer his nominators, “During his three years working as a student employee for Career Services, Max has held several roles. Prior to and during spring semester of 2020, Max worked as a CliftonStrengths Peer Coach, engaging with students one-on-one to help them realize, understand and contextualize their own strengths in both their personal and professional lives. Max made a tremendous impact on this program, not only positively influencing the students he engaged with but also collaborating effectively with his peers and Career Service’s professional staff members. The positive interactions were evidenced by the high ratings he received on post-appointment surveys and in unsolicited feedback from students.One student wrote the following after their strengths chat with Max:I truly appreciated having an outlet for once and being able to have deeper than a surface-level conversation with a new person. You reassured me in a lot of areas where I felt like my strengths were flaws and I am working on loving those strengths equally in order to be the best version of myself. My roommate and I are on much better terms and I have been engaging with her more often to facilitate conversations.Max has impacted Career Services positively through his kind and thoughtful interactions and through additional projects that support the entire department. Max has completed several projects to analyze large pieces of data about student interaction with Career Services. At least three times over the last year, Max reviewed 1,000+ lines of qualitative data and pulled out themes that were used for decision making and reporting. With an eye for constant improvement, Max also initiated several tasks and projects that he thought would benefit the office. In the summer of 2020, Career Services underwent a reorganization which involved shifting Max’s role to support the Embedded Career Advising Team for CMCI. Max quickly adapted to these significant changes in his work and began hosting drop-in hours for students with questions around topics related to professional development. With little notice, Max confidently hosted a weekly resume writing workshop that supported 80+ students in Fall 2020. His adaptability and knowledge around these topics demonstrate his strong sense of professionalism, work ethic and career management. As Max has taught and partnered with others on topics related to their professional development he has grown in his own conceptions of his future career.Throughout the transition and amongst numerous roles and expectations, Max is accountable, positive, thoughtful and engaged. He does not just do what is asked of him but continuously steps up to take on more projects, to learn new skills and to be a positive liaison to Career Services. Max is well known amongst the Career Services staff as a go-to team member and someone willing to step up and take on new projects. He’s used his skills around data analysis (learned from his major in Information Science) to present on the impact of the CliftonStrengths Peer Coaching Program. He also learned both Handshake and Buff Portal Advising and then conducted trainings on these platforms to additional students not only demonstrating his strong commitment to the team, but also his aptitude for digital technology.Max is truly exemplary in all the projects he takes on, and more than that, is a joy to work with. Anyone who engages with Max, whether it be peer student employees, student clients or professional staff members, is left with a smile on their face as a result of his authenticity, genuine care for others, willingness to help in any way he can and positive demeanor. It has been a tremendous joy supervising Max.”last_img read more

Read more

Iconic Piedmont Producer Vietti Releases First Ever Vintage of Timorasso

first_imgEmail Pinterest Previous articleHope Estate Winery Launches ‘Hope for the Koalas’ Campaign to Help Australian Koala FoundationNext articleUSDA and USTR Announce Continued Progress on Implementation of U.S.-China Phase One Agreement Press Release Home Industry News Releases Iconic Piedmont Producer Vietti Releases First Ever Vintage of TimorassoIndustry News ReleasesWine BusinessIconic Piedmont Producer Vietti Releases First Ever Vintage of TimorassoBy Press Release – March 24, 2020 445 0 Facebook TAGSLuca CurradoVietti Twitter Advertisement2018 Derthona Timorasso DOC to arrive in US market this Spring(March 24, 2020; Napa, CA)—Luca Currado, fifth-generation winemaker for Vietti, along with his wife Elena Currado, commercial director, are pleased to introduce the first vintage of Timorasso from the winery arriving in the USA this month.  Vietti, located in Castiglione Falletto, Piedmont, Italy, has long been admired as one of the leading producers of Barolo, Barbera and Barbaresco. Luca’s father, Alfredo Currado, was a trailblazer in the region and was the first to bottle a single variety white wine when he released the Roero Arneis in 1967. After years of research and collaboration with local winemakers in the Derthona area of Colli Tortonesi, the seminal winery has released a second white wine, the 2018 Derthona Timorasso (SRP $32).Located in Piedmont, just 62 miles from Castiglione Falletto, lie the Tortona hills, which stand at the crossroads of four different regions: Piedmont, Lombardy, Emilia Romagna and Liguria. Centered on the town known in ancient Rome as Derthona, it is here in the Colli Tortonesi winegrowing area where the native white Piedmontese grape Timorasso thrives. The blue marl of the “Tortonian” geological period found in the hills is also what comprises the ridge running through the Barolo vineyards, making it a natural fit for Vietti. Known for their constant experimentation and desire to break pre-established winemaking boundaries, Elena and Luca have created a Timorasso with ageability and finesse.Timorasso had been grown around Tortona during the middle ages and was considered the most important Piedmontese white wine varietal in terms of surface area and production. However, in 1879, the phylloxera epidemic devastated the region, and the variety was largely excluded, because of the economic crisis. After World War II, the region’s viticulture transitioned to almost entirely red varieties, and the variety nearly diminished. Then, in the 1980s, pioneers Walter Massa and Andrea Mutti laid the foundation for the renaissance of the variety. The bottled result was a wine of distinction and soon other Tortona producers followed suit. At the beginning of the year 2000, Timorasso began to be associated with the name of the town of Tortona in ancient times: Derthona. Today, the name Derthona represents the Piedmontese white wine made exclusively from Timorasso grapes grown on the Tortona hills, and it aims to be the symbol of the renaissance of the Colli Tortonesi winegrowing area.“The research and care dedicated to the production of this wine shows the will of Massa and Mutti to bring to the fore the unmistakable identity of a particular Piedmontese terroir,” says Luca Currado ViettiVietti is currently developing additional vineyards in Derthona and plans to add one more bottling to the portfolio in the future.Vietti wines are imported exclusively by Dalla Terra Winery Direct® and the wines are offered at an incredible value due to Dalla Terra’s unique business model. Dalla Terra forgoes the traditional three-tiered distribution system, allowing distributors to purchase and ship wine direct from the wineries, eliminating an average of 25% in mark-ups on each bottle imported. About ViettiLocated in the heart of the Langhe hills, at the top of the village of Castiglione Falletto, the Vietti wine cellar was founded in the late 1800’s by Carlo Vietti and has gradually grown over the course of time to include some of the most highly prized terroirs within the Barolo winegrowing area. In the 1960’s Luciana Vietti married winemaker and art lover Alfredo Currado, whose intuitions – from the production of one of the first Barolo crus (Rocche di Castiglione – 1961), through the single-varietal vinification of Arneis (1967) to the invention of Artist Labels (1974) – made him both symbol and architect of some of the most significant revolutions of the time. His intellectual, professional and prospective legacy was taken up by Luca Currado Vietti (Luciana and Alfredo’s son) and his wife Elena, who have contributed to the success of the Vietti brand through a constant drive for quality, considered experimentation and working for expansion and consolidation internationally. In 2016 the historic winery was acquired by Krause Holdings, enabling Luca and Elena, always at the head of Vietti brand, to add a number of prized crus to the estate’s holdings, and be able as a result to look to a future with new, stimulating prospects, all while maintaining the family approach for which the cellar has always been known.About Dalla Terra Winery Direct®Founded in 1990, Dalla Terra Winery Direct® is a direct importer and national agent of a select group of leading, family-owned, estate wineries in Italy. The name Dalla Terra translates from Italian to mean of the earth and represents a commitment to work alongside estates that have achieved reputations for top quality production in their respective regions or appellations. The wines they produce are authentic, indigenous and characterful, while embracing progressive viticulture and winemaking.Dalla Terra’s ability to adapt to an ever-changing marketplace is due to its highly curated portfolio and innovative business model. By limiting its portfolio, and partnering with only the highest quality producers, Dalla Terra ensures that its portfolio will be a comprehensive source of remarkable Italian wines. The quality of the portfolio is complemented by Dalla Terra Winery Direct’s business model which guarantees value by circumventing the traditional national importer expense of the three-tier system and enables their distributor partners to buy directly from each producer.  This results in a competitive price advantage and greater value to the consumer for some of the most iconic and significant producers in Italian wine.Advertisement ReddIt Linkedin Sharelast_img read more

Read more

New 40-bed ward to be built at Cornwall Regional Hospital

first_imgAdvertisements New 40-bed ward to be built at Cornwall Regional Hospital Health & WellnessJanuary 7, 2011 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail A new medical ward, accommodating 40 beds, is to be built at the Cornwall Regional Hospital in Montego Bay, St. James. This was announced by Minister of Health, Hon. Rudyard Spencer, on January 6, at a function at the hospital, to honour long-time donor of the health facility, Ms. Billie Rees West. “We have already identified the space for the new medical ward. The new ward will house both male and female patients and will reduce the time it takes for patients to be admitted. The proposal for funding is already being developed,” the Minister said. Minister of Health, Hon. Rudyard Spencer (centre), speaking with patients during his tour of the Cornwall Regional Hospital on January 6. He informed that among new initiatives to come on stream at the Cornwall Regional Hospital was the establishment of a contract with IGL to pipe the health facility for oxygen and medical gases at a cost of approximately $12 million. “This project will begin next Monday, January 10 and will, in the long run, result in tremendous savings for us as it will reduce wastage and limit the use of cylinders. Gases will now be delivered more efficiently and the overall cost for medical gases will be less,” Mr. Spencer pointed out. He also announced plans for significant improvements to dental services at the hospital. “As we speak, the technocrats in the Ministry are in a retreat with the dentists, in an effort to address some of the unresolved issues. We are in the process of procuring some new equipment for that area and we are spending some $8 million to acquire 16 new dental chairs. We are committed to placing more focus on dental services for the new financial year,” he said. “The extension of the services at the hospital is a reflection of our continued commitment to provide health services to the people of Jamaica, particularly in the western region,” the Minister added. Minister of Health, Hon. Rudyard Spencer (right), presents a plaque to Billie Rees West (seated), long-time contributor to the Cornwall Regional Hospital, at an appreciation ceremony at the hospital on January 6. Professor Charles Bagwell is seated behind Ms. West. Mr. Spencer congratulated Ms. West for her “tremendous” help to the development of the Cornwall Regional Hospital. “We are here to recognise and honour a very special person who has contributed tremendously to the development of the hospital, the western region and health care in Jamaica, Billie Rees West. For over 20 years you have been offering dedicated service to Jamaica in the area of health care. I would like to thank you for your commitment to this hospital and to patient care in Jamaica. You are an example to all of us and I encourage more persons to follow your lead,” the Minister told Ms. West. Mr. Henry presented a plaque to Ms. West, who lives in the United States. RelatedNew 40-bed ward to be built at Cornwall Regional Hospitalcenter_img RelatedNew 40-bed ward to be built at Cornwall Regional Hospital RelatedNew 40-bed ward to be built at Cornwall Regional Hospitallast_img read more

Read more