White House rep announces domestic violence, sexual assault helpline

first_imgAlaska Native Government & Policy | Federal Government | Health | Sexual Abuse & Domestic ViolenceWhite House rep announces domestic violence, sexual assault helplineOctober 20, 2016 by Jennifer Canfield, KTOO Share:A new resource for Alaska Native and American Indian victims of domestic violence and sexual assault will be available in January.Tracy Goodluck from the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs at the White House announced the Strong Hearts Helpline on Thursday at the Alaska Federation of Natives convention in Fairbanks.“The new helpline will provide culturally and linguistically appropriate services by and for Native women and will assist American Indian and Alaska Native survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault with safety planning, emotional support and referrals to local resources,” Goodluck said.The helpline is a collaboration between the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center and the National Domestic Violence Hotline. It’s scheduled to launch Jan. 4.Share this story:last_img read more

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AG Barr says ‘everything is on the table’ to solve Alaska’s public safety crisis

first_imgAlaska Native Government & Policy | Alcohol & Substance Abuse | Community | Crime & Courts | Federal Government | Local Government | Mental Health | Public Safety | Sexual Abuse & Domestic Violence | Southwest | WesternAG Barr says ‘everything is on the table’ to solve Alaska’s public safety crisisJune 10, 2019 by Krysti Shallenberger, KYUK-Bethel Share:U.S. Attorney General William Barr heard concerns from Alaska Native leaders about the lack of law enforcement and high rates of sexual assault and domestic violence in rural Alaska. (Photo by Joey Mendolia/Alaska Public Media)Late last month, U.S. Attorney General William Barr spent three days touring Alaska with the congressional delegation to hear about and see for himself the lack of public safety in rural Alaska. He spent a day in Bethel and the nearby village of Napaskiak.Barr’s security detail outnumbered the number of village public safety officers in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, a region roughly the geographic size of Oregon.Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2019/06/190531_barr_visit_fixed.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Western Alaska has a public safety crisis, one that’s been there for decades.A recent Anchorage Daily News article highlighted just how bad it is: At one point this year, at least 1 in 3 rural Alaska villages had no law enforcement. Western Alaska also has some of the highest rates of domestic violence and sexual assault in the nation, and ranks high in the number of murdered and missing Indigenous women.With U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, by his side, the attorney general made his first visit to the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.“You have to see it to understand it,” Barr said.Barr said that it’s hard for him to imagine a “more vulnerable population.” And he said that even the bare minimum of basic safety standards is lacking in the Y-K Delta.Barr and Murkowski first visited Bethel’s Tundra Women’s Coalition, one of two women’s shelters in the region. Staff there told them that they were over capacity and struggling to make room for families coming in. Ina Marie Chaney, a shelter manager, said that a case has to be pretty serious before the shelter can even consider it.“Right now we’re screening on lethality cases,” Chaney told Murkowski and Barr.And then Barr heard from the Association of Village Council Presidents about the public safety crisis and their ideas about fixing it. Reporters were not allowed in that meeting.AVCP CEO Vivian Korthuis told KYUK later that they presented Barr with a plan to build seven public safety centers in the region, and she hopes that they will get the resources they need to build them.Then it was time to visit Napaskiak. People lined the banks as the boats carrying Barr and Murkowski pulled up to shore.Their first stop was the jail. Inside the large red building are cells made of wood, with wooden doors.Napaskiak has two tribal police officers and two village police officers. All of them are working part-time; they work one week on and one week off. Napaskiak used to have two state-trained village public safety officers, but they left.Barr also visited the school. There, Native Village of Napaskiak President Stephen Maxie Jr. begged him to declare an emergency because of how many alcohol-related deaths happened in the village over the past two years.“The poor suffer the most, and they don’t got the most. They’re hurt the most because we’re always overlooked and always put aside,” Maxie said.Barr said that he sees that the criminal justice system isn’t working for Alaska Native tribes. And as for the types of solutions, he said “everything is on the table.”Meanwhile, another tribal police officer is set to leave after only a couple of months on the job: Harry Williams said that he plans to go to building maintenance. The reason? Better pay and benefits.Barr has said he plans to return to the Y-K Delta. At an Anchorage meeting, he told leaders that he would schedule a followup meeting. So far, no date has been set.Share this story:last_img read more

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News / Container terminals are becoming ‘swamped’ by large alliances, warns FMC

first_imgBy Mike Wackett 21/04/2015 Large ocean carrier alliances are contributing to port congestion, according to Federal Maritime Commissioner (FMC) William Doyle, speaking at the European Maritime Law Organisation’s (EMLO) Spring Seminar in Athens last Friday.Commissioner Doyle said: “In my view, we could be experiencing some growing pains, not so much with the two or three company-sized alliances, but instead with the alliances that contain a larger number of companies.”Citing the Asia – US west coast trade lane, which was badly affected by congestion and industrial action last year, and in the early part of 2015, Mr Doyle said the “disorganised” block loading of containers at load ports was a contributing factor leading to confusion at the discharge terminal.“The containers are scattered all over the west coast terminals making it difficult and time consuming for the truckers and shippers to retrieve their cargo,” he said.The four east – west trade vessel-sharing alliances consist of the 2M with two partners, the Ocean Three, the CKYHE with five carriers and the G6 with six member carriers.It has been reported that the G6 alliance has the most complicated operation at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, serving seven terminals at the San Pedro Bay port complex, with some of the members suffering above par extra costs during the peak of the congestion troubles.The commissioner said the problem had been aggravated by ships not meeting their scheduled windows, “resulting in vessel bunching upon reaching the discharge ports”.He added: “Once at the terminal, these new larger ships discharge cargo, one ship after the other – swamping the terminal.”There is no doubt that an 8,000 – 10,000 teu ship co-loading for six carriers in Asia from four or five ports for discharge, at seven terminals on the US west coast, is an extremely challenging operation requiring a complex stowage plan.As the so-called ‘grey’ chassis-sharing agreement has eased this particular pinch point at the LA / LB terminals, there have been calls for carriers to adopt a similar interchange of containers, especially among the large alliances.However, although there are obvious benefits from this co-operation – assuming it would be able to clear regulatory hurdles – carriers are still reluctant to give up their only differentiating branding from the mega-alliance operations.Meanwhile, Mr Doyle’s remarks follow the release earlier in the week of the FMC’s report on the escalating problem of detention and demurrage charges at US hub ports.The FMC held port congestion forums in the second half of 2014 at Los Angeles, Baltimore, Charleston and New Orleans and heard complaints from importers, exporters and trucking companies that they were being obliged to pay demurrage and detention charges even though it was impossible to collect containers within the free period allowed.One shipper told FMC staff that it had paid over $100,000 in demurrage charges over the preceding year compared with $10,000 for the previous 12-month period.The ‘discussion paper’ will “help stimulate solutions to problems”, and Mr Doyle said he hoped that it would “entice the maritime community to resolve their differences on demurrage and detention without direct action being taken by the FMC”.last_img read more

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News / Addison Lee driver is a company worker not self-employed, rules court

first_imgBy Gavin van Marle 03/08/2017 A UK employment court has ruled against courier firm Addison Lee, deciding one of its drivers had been unlawfully classified as an independent contractor rather than an employee.The London Central Employment tribunal yesterday ruled that Christopher Gascoigne is consequently entitled to holiday pay and the national minimum wage – the amount of holiday pay owed by the company to Mr Gascoigne will be determined in a later hearing.In contrast to independent contractors, are entitled to holiday pay, guaranteed minimum wage and protection against discrimination, as well as rights to sick pay and protection against unfair dismissal.The decision is the latest victory for the Independent Workers’ Union of Great Britain (IWGB), which has won four “gig economy” employment cases against courier companies CitySprint, Excel, eCourier and now Addison Lee.In all four, judges ruled or the company admitted that the couriers were in fact workers and not independent contractors.“As if we needed any more evidence; today’s judgment once again proves our point. The law is clear and employers in the so-called ‘gig economy’ have been choosing to unlawfully deprive their workers of rights,” said IWGB general secretary Dr Jason Moyer-Lee.The IWGB is also currently awaiting a decision by the Central Arbitration Committee on the employment status and union recognition case it brought against food delivery company Deliveroo.last_img read more

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‘Essentially witchcraft’: A former naturopath takes on her colleagues

first_img “[Naturopaths] want to be able to do everything an MD wants to do — but they also want to practice essentially witchcraft.” One of her patients, Emilie Bishop, was suffering from endometriosis — a painful disorder in which tissues normally inside the uterus grow outside it. She’d been struggling to get pregnant for months when her obstetrician referred her to a naturopathic clinic. Bishop had tried all manner of traditional medical therapies, including surgery to address the endometriosis, but it hadn’t helped. She figured she didn’t have anything to lose.“Naturopathy can sound crazy, but it was no less crazy than anyone else’s approaches,” said Bishop, now 32.She found her way to Hermes, who started her on a handful of supplements and a vegan diet. Their first appointment turned into an hour-and-a-half long conversation.“It was really refreshing to have someone who really listened to how the problems were affecting me and my body,” Bishop said.But there wasn’t any difference in her pain, and Bishop still struggled to get pregnant. As the months went on, Bishop grew wary of the recommendations Hermes made. Bishop points to one email she received from Hermes laying out plans to get her ovulating normally again to boost her chances of getting pregnant.“She started playing fertility doctor, and she wasn’t listening to what I wanted or what I needed,” Bishop said. “I felt like she was out of her depth.”Hermes now realizes that she was — but at the time, she said, she genuinely believed in what she’d been taught.“I trusted the naturopaths more than the scientists,” she said. About the Author Reprints Dr. David Palma, a radiation oncologist at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, said he uses Naturopathic Diaries as a resource when talking with patients who want to seek alternative care.He doesn’t have a problem with them reaching out to alternative practitioners to complement their traditional medical care. But he has seen catastrophic consequences when a patient rejects a traditional therapy with a high cure rate and instead pursues an “all-natural” treatment.“For us, as doctors, it’s heartbreaking. But it’s absolutely within a patient’s rights as a long as that patient is well-informed,” Palma said.That’s where work like Naturopathic Diaries comes in, he said.Under assault from former colleaguesThere’s been an onslaught of criticism — some of it vitriolic — since Hermes began blogging about naturopathy as a former insider. The comments on her site say it all.“[You] became very bitter to the field of Naturopathic Medicine due to the fact that you were not a good doctor period … You need to pray to God and he will lead you to what you were called to do on this earth, but it clearly was not to be a Naturopathic Doctor,” one commenter writes.Another commenter called Hermes and her guest authors “witch-hunters.”And an especially determined critic has set up a website to pick apart Hermes’s petition to stop naturopaths from getting licensed.That site, and many supporters of naturopathy, point to a handful of randomized studies that suggest it can have some benefit.A 2009 study published in PLOS One, for example, looked at 75 patients with moderate to severe anxiety. They were treated with either a standard psychotherapy intervention that included deep-breathing techniques or a naturopathic treatment that included dietary counseling, deep-breathing techniques, multivitamins, and an herbal medicine called ashwagandha. @meggophone Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. The American Association of Naturopathic Physicians declined to comment. But some of Hermes’s former colleagues have attacked her for what they see as a misleading attack on the profession.Mainstream doctors say Hermes is a powerful voice in taking on alternative medicine for one clear reason — she knows it from the inside out.“Naturopaths dislike me, but they loathe Britt because she’s a traitor,” said Dr. David Gorski, the managing editor of Science-Based Medicine, who has also spoken out against the naturopathic industry.“They really, really, really hate her.”From itchy skin to a $200,000 degree in naturopathyHermes, who’s now 32, spent her high school days plagued by terrible psoriasis, a skin condition marked by itchy, red patches. She started taking cod liver oil and changed her diet to see if either would help, which she thought they did.“I became sort of obsessed with the idea of being able to treat it without prescription medicines,” she said.Britt Hermes Taylor HermesThat sparked a deep desire in Hermes: She wanted to hit an ideal state of health without needing to rely on conventional medicine. She went on to enroll at Bastyr University, an alternative medicine school based in Washington state. It’s one of a half-dozen naturopathic and alternative medicine universities in the United States.At Bastyr, Hermes took classes with names that would seem familiar to conventional medical students, like human anatomy and physiology. But she also studied botanical medicine, hydrotherapy, and homeopathy, a practice founded on the theory that extremely diluted concentrations of certain compounds can treat disease. Homeopathy has been widely debunked as pseudoscience.Currently, 17 states and the District of Columbia have laws requiring naturopathic providers to be licensed or registered. They need a degree in naturopathic studies and a passing score on the NPLEX, or the Naturopathic Physicians licensing exam.Naturopathic students can opt to perform a residency, but there aren’t nearly enough spots for the number of students graduating each year, said Jane Guiltinan, the dean of the School of Naturopathic Medicine at Bastyr. So many go right into practice on their own. By contrast, young MDs fresh out of medical school generally spend at least three years in residency, where they work under the supervision of veteran physicians.Hermes has railed against the Bastyr curriculum as wholly inadequate to train practicing clinicians. She says she never learned about the medical standard of care for most illnesses and had minimal experience working directly with ill patients.“I know it sounds cynical, but naturopathic medical care is like picking treatments out of a magical hat,” she wrote in a blog post on Naturopathic Diaries back in May of 2015.A very deceiving advert. ND education is not based on standard medicine. The profession is weakly regulated by its own. https://t.co/indKSXBLws— Britt Marie Hermes (@NaturoDiaries) October 18, 2016 News Editor Related: Megan Thielking Impersonating a doctor is hard; masquerading as a healer is easy Related: Hermes’s activism comes at a time when the roughly 4,400 licensed naturopaths in the US are organizing and pushing for more legitimacy.In May, more than 100 aspiring and practicing naturopaths descended on Capitol Hill to rally support for a federal pilot program that would allow them to be reimbursed by Medicare for some patients. They’re also lobbying for expanded authority to diagnose and treat patients in a handful of states, including Massachusetts and Michigan.Those lobbying efforts are funded in part by vitamin companies that want to see the profession grow. Many naturopaths tout dietary supplements, herbal remedies, and vitamin infusions for healing. Gorski said the attacks on Hermes aren’t just about her work in naturopathy. They’re about her as a person, too.“What I have come to appreciate, perhaps because I’m a middle-aged white guy, is just how much [online] abuse, sexual and misogynistic abuse … that women put up with,” he said. “And of course she’s perfect for that.”Hermes tries not to take those attacks to heart — but that doesn’t mean she’s not listening.“I am open to these critiques and consider them carefully,” she said. “But none have yet [presented] a compelling argument that I have mischaracterized naturopathic medicine.”So she’s not backing down. Nor is she slowing down. For now, she’s focused on building a career in molecular biology. She sees herself staying in the lab — and out of the exam room — and hopes to improve the lives of patients through her research.Hermes said she doesn’t have any desire to seek out naturopathic care anymore, but she recently got a lesson from her doctor about how stress might be affecting her health. Her iron levels were low and she needed to eat more meat, the doctor said.“Here was this MD providing me what naturopaths would call naturopathic care. But the aspects that do work are not unique to naturopathy,” Hermes said.“I walked out of that appointment much happier than I should have been.” Naturopaths, often derided as quacks, push to go mainstream — with help from vitamin companies Eros Dervishi for STAT Britt Hermes, former naturopath Please enter a valid email address. Britt Hermes once considered herself a doctor. Now, she’s an apostate.Hermes spent three years practicing naturopathy, a broad-reaching form of alternative medicine that focuses on “natural” care, including herbal remedies, acupuncture, and the discredited practice of homeopathy. But unease about a colleague’s ethics led her to look more closely at her profession — and what she found alarmed her.So for the past two years, Hermes has been waging a scathing fight against naturopathy on social media, in science blogs, and on her own website, Naturopathic Diaries, which just won a “best blog of the year” award from a scientific skepticism magazine in the United Kingdom. She has not pulled punches.advertisement Privacy Policy Hermes has said naturopaths use a “cornucopia of pseudoscientific methods.” She posts articles with the blunt headlines like “Naturopathic pediatrics is not safe,” “Naturopaths need to back off autism,” and “Naturopathic medicine has too much quackery.” And she’s circulating an online petition to stop states from recognizing naturopaths as primary care physicians. Her message: “Naturopaths are not doctors.”“I’m trying to contextualize and call out the false and exaggerated claims,” she said. “They want to be able to do everything an MD wants to do — but they also want to practice essentially witchcraft.”advertisement Leave this field empty if you’re human: Both groups saw significant improvements in anxiety — but the naturopathic patients also reported more improvement in ancillary quality of life measures. The study did not, however, single out the individual effects of each treatment component to figure out what, if anything, gave the naturopathy recipients that added boost.Another study cited by naturopaths looked at 207 patients with cardiovascular disease. Some patients received care from just their family physician, while others received care from both their family doctors and naturopaths who provided health and nutrition counseling or dietary supplementation.Those in the naturopathic group had a 3 percent reduction in cardiovascular disease risk after a decade. But the study’s authors point out that they didn’t receive naturopathic care alone, but naturopathy plus conventional care. It’s also possible that the difference came from the extra time they spent in consultation with a clinician — and that they would have gotten similar benefit from appointments with any type of health care professional, not just naturopaths.Both those trials, and others cited by naturopathy advocates, are also small — larger, more robust studies would be needed to prove that naturopathic care is safe and effective for treating certain [email protected] Don’t risk it. Naturopathic “doctors” are hazardous to your health. Find a real physician whom you like.— Britt Marie Hermes (@NaturoDiaries) October 19, 2016 Health‘Essentially witchcraft’: A former naturopath takes on her colleagues “I literally needed to start over. I was terrified,” Hermes said. She packed up her bags and moved with her husband to Germany for his work. There, she decided to go back to school to study science — again. Hermes is now in a master’s program at the University of Kiel, studying the mammalian microbiome.After her second day of molecular biology class in the new program, Hermes went home and cried. She’d thought she had learned the basics at Bastyr, but now she realized the coursework hadn’t been nearly as rigorous as she’d thought. She was surprised she had to work to understand the concepts. Her previous studies had been a breeze.“I remember studying for my classes while sunbathing by the pool,” she said.That frustration and anger sparked Hermes to start her blog, Naturopathic Diaries. She spends about 30 hours a month on it and other forms of media.Please stop lying about naturopaths being able to treat chronic pain in veterans. https://t.co/wwrRn2OIRe— Britt Marie Hermes (@NaturoDiaries) October 19, 2016 Bishop tried other naturopaths but felt that they blamed her when their treatments failed. “I heard, ‘You didn’t do it long enough, you didn’t do it well enough, you need to try harder,’” she said.In the end, she did become pregnant and had a son. He was still little when she stumbled over the Naturopathic Diaries blog. She pored over every post Hermes had written.“It was just so freeing to me to hear that it was all crap,” Bishop said. “It wasn’t that I wasn’t doing the treatment well enough or that I wasn’t trying hard enough. It was that I was using treatments that weren’t likely to help no matter what I did.”Bishop reached out to Hermes and asked if she could write a guest post on the blog; Hermes obliged.“I bear no ill will toward her. I bear a lot of ill will toward the naturopathic profession,” Bishop said.Soon enough, so would Hermes.A distressing discovery leads to a quick exitShe’d been practicing in Arizona for about two years when she said she discovered her supervisor had been importing a non-FDA approved drug called Ukrain from Austria to treat cancer patients. Hermes found out on a Friday in May of 2014.On Monday, she quit.Hermes reported her supervisor, Michael Uzick, to the state board governing naturopathy. She wasn’t just upset by his decision to treat cancer patients with an unapproved, potentially risky drug, she said. She was upset by how he responded when she confronted him.“He said he knew he was walking the ethical and legal line, but that most naturopaths do this,” Hermes said.She also spoke with a mentor in the field, who told her that she was making too big of a deal out of the situation. Hermes couldn’t shake her anger at the casual responses from colleagues she’d once respected.Uzick was reprimanded by the board that governs naturopathic doctors in Arizona. He did not respond to a request for comment for this story.But when he talked to Hermes, “He accused me of wanting to take down the entire naturopathic profession,” she said.She took that as a challenge.After she’d quit her job, Hermes found herself in a serious bind. She couldn’t get a job in the medical field or teaching medical science in academia with a naturopathic degree. She had spent more than $200,000 and four years on an education she felt she could no longer use.Here is my naturopathic “doctorate” from @Bastyr, a $250,000 piece of paper that makes no one a doctor. Photo by @andreaskyriacou at #QEDcon pic.twitter.com/lPakbND45f— Britt Marie Hermes (@NaturoDiaries) October 19, 2016 By Megan Thielking Oct. 20, 2016 Reprints [email protected] Dean Guiltinan disputes her assessment. “The curriculum at Bastyr is quite rigorous,” she said. “I have full confidence that our graduates can enter primary care.”A patient’s struggle with infertilityHermes had that confidence, too. At least at first.She graduated from Bastyr in 2011 and completed a one-year residency in family medicine and pediatrics at an alternative medicine clinic. (She was licensed under her maiden name, Britt Deegan.)She saw herself as a primary care doctor for patients who didn’t want to seek conventional medical care — and she had no hesitation treating them. She provided checkups for kids and consulted with sick cancer patients.“I had become so comfortable with the speech and the rhetoric that I considered myself a doctor,” she said. “It wasn’t difficult to convince anyone I knew what I was doing.” Tags alternative medicinemedical educationnaturopathylast_img read more

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Pharmalittle: Gates Foundation and others plan $125 million coronavirus effort; India considers lifting export restrictions

first_img Ed Silverman What’s included? @Pharmalot About the Author Reprints Log In | Learn More Pharmalot Alex Hogan/STAT Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Rise and shine, everyone, another busy day is clearly on the way. The world seems to be spinning faster suddenly, does it not? Well, in such moments, there is only one thing to do — brew a cup of stimulation. Not that we need any help staying awake right now, but why not get an extra edge, yes? On that note, time to dig in to the to-do list and get cracking. As for you, here are some tidbits to help on your own journey. Hope all goes well today and you stay healthy.The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, along with the Wellcome research charity and Mastercard, are launching a $125 million effort to speed drug development to treat the novel coronavirus, STAT writes. The initiative, the Covid-19 Therapeutics Accelerator, will not be enough to develop a single new medicine by itself, but can jump-start the process. The plan is to provide funds to as many as two dozen companies and academic researchers immediately, before government funding will be available.center_img By Ed Silverman March 10, 2020 Reprints Pharmalittle: Gates Foundation and others plan $125 million coronavirus effort; India considers lifting export restrictions GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. [email protected] Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. What is it? Tags pharmalittleSTAT+last_img read more

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North Korea starts selection process for divided family reunions: veterans ‘a…

first_img News NewsEconomy SHARE US dollar and Chinese reminbi plummet against North Korean won once again RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Twitter North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only) News center_img Kang Mi JinKang Mi JinKang Mi Jin is a North Korean defector turned journalist who fled North Korea in 2009. She has a degree in economics and writes largely on marketization and economy-related issues for Daily NK. Questions about her articles can be directed to [email protected] North Korea starts selection process for divided family reunions: veterans ‘a priority’ News Lee Heung Jong, who is North Korean, cries while meeting his daughter, Lee Jung Suk, who is South Korean, during the October 2015 divided family reunions at Kumgang Mountain in North Korea. Image: Korea Press Photographers AssociationNorth Korea has reportedly begun preparations to select participants for the upcoming inter-Korean family reunions, set to take place at North’s Mount Kumgang resort from August 20 to 26. The North Korean authorities have stated that former members of the “volunteer army” (those who supported the Korean People’s Army during the Korean War) have priority, and the state is currently conducting background checks and evaluating the level of their “loyalty” toward the state.“The process of selecting participants for the divided family reunions is currently ongoing in each region of the country,” said a South Pyongan-based source on July 2. “Those who were born in South Korea and participated in the Korean War as volunteer soldiers are being placed on lists and undergoing background checks.”“Currently, Korean Workers’ Party representatives are visiting the homes of former volunteer army veterans and assessing their mental health, living conditions, and level of loyalty to the regime,” the source said.A source in Pyongyang added, “State officials are the only ones who know how many volunteer army veterans there are and how many are still alive. Most of them are more than 80 years old, so there are likely very few left.” The North Korean authorities have chosen the volunteer army veterans as a priority because of their advanced age and their relatively higher loyalty to the regime. In-depth investigations into the loyalty of such individuals toward the regime and their songbun status (societal status based on family political background and loyalty) are being conducted to determine eligibility.As inter-Korean relations have rapidly improved, North Koreans with family members who have defected to South Korea are expressing hope in advance of the family reunions.“Many members of divided families in North Korea were classified as dangers to the state in the 1950s, but they are now allowed to meet with their families in South Korea,” the Pyongyang-based source said. “Many people here hope that North Korean defectors may also have the chance to meet their families in North Korea again.”The source in South Pyongan Province explained that because inter-Korean relations have improved, many North Korean state officials have become more light-hearted than in the past. “A Party official joked that he hoped he could eat a South Korean choco-pie while at the reunions,” she said. By Kang Mi Jin – 2018.07.04 5:51pm Proposal to shift “general markets” to “specialized markets” finds little support among N. Korean leaderslast_img read more

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B.C. man gets three months in jail for violating securities ban

first_imgJudge gavel, scales of justice and law books in court flynt/123RF A man from Port Moody, B.C. was sentenced Feb. 28 in Surrey Provincial Court to three months in jail for violating a permanent ban on capital market activities.Rui Armando Figueiredo (a.k.a. Roy Figueiredo), 58, pleaded guilty to one count of breaching an order of the British Columbia Securities Commission (BCSC), and will serve the three-month sentence consecutively with a three-and-a-half-year sentence for fraud charges brought by the Surrey RCMP. IE Staff FCA seeks consumer duty standards He also will be on probation for two years following his release from custody and was ordered to pay $1.8 million in restitution to the victims of the fraud.In 2016 a BCSC panel found that Figueiredo operated a fraudulent investment scheme through his companies PARE Realty Ltd. and 0929870 B.C. Ltd. He was permanently banned from purchasing and trading in any securities or exchange contracts; becoming or acting as a director or officer of any issuer or registrant; becoming or acting as a registrant or promoter; engaging in investor relations activities; and acting in a management or consultative capacity in connection with the securities market.A 2017 investigation by the BCSC’s Criminal Investigations Branch found that Figueiredo traded in securities and acted as a director and officer of 1092580 B.C. Ltd., contrary to the 2016 BCSC order.Figueiredo has been in custody since his arrest on the BCSC’s charges in June 2017. Due to the time that Figueiredo has already spent in custody, he has approximately 14 months remaining on his total sentence. Keywords Securities regulationsCompanies British Columbia Securities Commission U.S. securities watchdogs reviewing recent stock market turbulence OSC adds three to IAP Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Provinces to feel the pandemic pinch in 2021: Moody’s

first_img Sovereign defaults hit record level in 2020: Fitch Share this article and your comments with peers on social media For the oil producing provinces, the pandemic effects will be augmented by the added fiscal challenge stemming from low oil prices, which Moody’s said “are too low to encourage significant private sector investment and will continue to suppress provincial oil royalties.”“Multi-year deficits are expected to arise for most Canadian provinces,” said Michael Yake, senior vice president at Moody’s, in a release.“Although some recovery in budgetary imbalances will begin in fiscal year 2021-22, we expect material deficits to continue as provinces delay implementation of fiscal consolidation measures until pandemic pressures have fully eased,” he added.Moody’s noted that the provinces will continue to benefit from federal supports and the low interest rate environment will enable governments to carry higher debts.Still, it expects provincial debt issuance will remain high in 2021 “with the aggregate provincial debt burden is expected to increase to 222% in fiscal year ending March 31, 2022.” James Langton Related news Keywords Pandemics,  Coronavirus,  Oil,  Credit ratings,  ProvincesCompanies Moody’s Investors Service Canada, provinces, map, red corund/123RF Canada’s provincial governments will be under pressure from the effects of Covid-19 in 2021, particularly the energy-dependent provinces, according to Moody’s Investors Service.The rating agency said its outlook for the provinces in 2021 is negative as government finances will face continued spending pressures due to the pandemic. A deadly first wave, followed by a tsunami of excess deaths Ontario unlikely to balance budget by 2030: FAO Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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Government Signs Wage Agreement With Police Federation

first_imgGovernment Signs Wage Agreement With Police Federation UncategorizedSeptember 14, 2008 RelatedGovernment Signs Wage Agreement With Police Federation Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail A new two-year wage agreement (2008 to 2010), was signed yesterday (Sept.11), between the Government and the Jamaica Police Federation, during a ceremony held at the Ministry of Finance and the Public Service, National Heroes Circle offices.Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Finance and the Public Service, Senator Dwight Nelson, noted that the 40-hour work week provision, which requires that police personnel who work excess hours be paid an allowance in place of overtime, was one of the key areas of the 2008/10 wage agreement. This he explains will be retroactive to April, 2008.“I honestly don’t think that there is any other group in the public sector who under normal circumstances are forced to work the extensive hours that members of the Police Force are forced to work. We have decided that it is totally unacceptable, in a context where we subscribe to the United Nations philosophy of decent work,” he stated.Other highlights include the agreement between the Ministry of National Security and the Police Federation, for the introduction of arrangements, which will allow members of the Constabulary Force to engage in “extra work”; as well as benefits for the development of personnel, including education grants, especially for tertiary level education.Minister of Finance and the Public Service, Audley Shaw, stated that he was pleased that the Government was able to come to an agreement with the Federation.“It breaks new ground in the sense that while it doesn’t fully incorporate all of what was probably needed in terms of the additional increments, it is a start. I want to thank you for coming to an agreement so we can get on with the business of doing what your mandate requires to serve and to protect,” Mr Shaw said.He also noted that over the next six months, the Force will receive some 200 new vehicles of different types such as utility pick-ups and motor cars.“We also want to ensure that we put aside adequate resources to improve the working conditions because we are aware of the parlous state of so many of our police stations island wide. This year some $900 million has been set aside and is now being spent (on) six new police stations and to repair probably close to 30 additional police stations,” Mr Shaw added.Meanwhile, Minister of National Security, Senator Colonel Trevor MacMillan, noted that he was pleased that the Government has reached an amicable agreement with the police.Chairman of the Federation, Corporal Raymond Wilson, also stated that he was pleased with the way the wage negotiations had taken place.center_img RelatedGovernment Signs Wage Agreement With Police Federation RelatedGovernment Signs Wage Agreement With Police Federationlast_img read more

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