A Conversation with Atlanta’s New Police Chief, Erika Shields

first_img For Whom The Bell Rings Atlanta Police Chief Erika Shields, speaking with Denis O’Hayer on “Morning Edition” (Broadcast Version)6:41Atlanta Police Chief Erika Shields, speaking with Denis O’Hayer on “Morning Edition” (Expanded Version)31:09At the beginning of 2017, Erika Shields became Atlanta’s new police chief.  In her first three months on the job, she has emphasized that preventing violent crime is her priority.  Shields now leads a force where she has spent 22 years — in jobs from beat patrols, to vice enforcement, to internal affairs, to deputy chief.Like us on FacebookShields talked about her career, and her priorities, in a wide-ranging conversation with Denis O’Hayer on “Morning Edition.”(Note:  The interview was conducted hours before a deadly shooting on a MARTA train; also hours before Gwinnett County fired two of its officers, amid allegations of excessive use of force.  The broadcast version of the interview covers those general subjects, but not those specific events.)(The expanded version also includes discussions of immigration; traffic enforcement following the I-85 bridge collapse; proposals to reduce the penalties for simple marijuana possession; the “campus carry” bill now on Governor Deal’s desk; and the whistleblower lawsuit which claims the APD diverted Federal funds to pay for overtime and buy vehicles for personal use by Mayor Reed and his family.) ‘It’s Fractured’: Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan On Healing Republican Party 6:41 | Play story Add to My ListIn My List Related Stories Share Legal Advocate Discusses Medical Abuse At Shut Down Georgia ICE Facility last_img read more

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Atlanta Is 14th On A List Of Hipster Cities. Here’s A Look At The Influential Subculture

first_img Willow Goldstein, left, is the founder and creative director of The Bakery, which is a multi-faceted arts complex in Southwest Atlanta. Meredith Kooi is an artist, curator and critic based in Atlanta. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Atlanta is a hotbed for hipsters.The city was 14th on MoveHub’s Hipster Index, which ranked 446 cities based on the number of vintage boutiques, vegan eateries, coffee shops, tattoo studios and record stores per 100,000 residents. Atlanta was the only Georgia city on the list.But being a “hipster city” means more than just coffee shops and trendy haircuts. The sometimes-ambiguous subculture has had a sweeping impact that can be felt throughout the region, experts say.“What’s put us on the map from an international level is the fact that we are creating music. We’re creating fashion. We’re creating film, television media that really impacts the entire world and influences the world,” ChooseATL Director of Marketing and Development Ashley Cleveland said. “And so a lot of that has come from what, I think, is known mainstream as the hipster culture.”Why Atlanta Attracts HipstersStill, hearing the word hipster does bring to mind a certain aesthetic, even if calling a person a hipster can’t necessarily be based on where they go or what they wear.While Your Dictionary says they’re a “young, non-traditional person who is an independent thinker,” Urban Dictionary claims they’re “people that try too hard to be different … by rejecting anything they deem to be too popular.”Even though the subculture and its effects can be disputed, one common thread among hipsters is the desire to express individuality.Cleveland said she thinks hipster and artistic cultures are intertwined, with artists frequenting yoga classes and thrift stores in the city.“I think that the hipster term is a little antiquated, specifically within the hipster community,” she said. “For folks that once identified as hipsters, I believe that a lot of those folks are now identifying as creatives.”Atlanta’s quality of life, cost of living and the creative industries can draw hipsters to the area, according to Cleveland.“Living in a place that they can play, as well as have access to their work but being aware of the environment and how their footprint impacts the world,” she said.Dawn Porras, owner of Joe’s East Atlanta Coffee Shop, said creatives, ranging from writers to artists, frequently use the neighborhood café as their workspace.“I can’t tell you the amount of books that have been written in the coffee shop, how many we’ve been given a credit to in someone’s novel, which is great, or someone’s thesis or people that are in there actively working on their art,” Porras said. The German Chocolate Cake is one of the dessert selections offered at Cafe Sunflower in Buckhead. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Dawn Porras owns the Joe’s East Atlanta Coffee Shop. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Sponsored Content Part 1: Atlanta Is 14th On A List Of Hipster Cities. Here’s A Look At The Influential Subculture Cleveland said hipsters have been “bubbling up” in Atlanta’s walkable neighborhoods, such as Old Fourth Ward, Edgewood, the Auburn District and West Midtown, for years.“I think it’s about consciousness of community and sustainability and access,” she said.A Catch-22Atlantan Sahima Godkhindi said the “hipster look” can be seen in the artist community, who are attracted to Atlanta for the financial opportunities within the area.“I just think [Atlanta’s] got a growing art community where the art could lead to paying money, paid gigs. So it’s a small enough pond for young artists to find their voice and find opportunities,” Godkhindi said. “So that might be a correlation.”While hipsters and artists can look similar in style, The Bakery founder Willow Goldstein said they are not the same.“There’s wearing overalls because you are actually doing manual labor,” Goldstein, creative director of the multi-faceted arts complex in Southwest Atlanta, said. Then, “there’s wearing overalls because you bought them at whatever store in Buckhead, Virginia-Highlands, name a place that are overalls that are for fashion and fashion alone.” Annie Sun is the General Manager at Cafe Sunflower Buckhead. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Pumakawa Navarro works at Joe’s Coffee. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Annie Sun is the General Manager at Cafe Sunflower Buckhead. Photo credit: Lauren Booker The Orzo Eggplant Lasagna, Sunflower Burger and Crab Cakes are a few of the vegan selections offered at Cafe Sunflower Buckhead. Photo credit: Lauren Booker The German Chocolate Cake is one of the dessert selections offered at Cafe Sunflower in Buckhead. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Joe’s Coffee East Atlanta Village features an art piece on the shop’s ceiling and serves a range of drinks. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Listen|0:27 Sun appreciates the hipsters who come into the restaurant, and they’ve contributed to her long-running, family-owned business’ growth.“Since veganism has gained so much more popularity, our restaurant has gained more exposure as well,” she said.However, some fear that with this growth comes more development in areas that could push people, like artists and low-income residents, out. Anderson said that the path from hip to hipster is “the path to gentrification.”“The rough neighborhood is the one that if artists will pretty it up, it eventually gets gentrified,” she said. “Basically, the path of gentrification is from what I see, especially in the hipster-focused area of study, is that it will start when artists move to a neighborhood. Artists do not typically move to a neighborhood intending to gentrify it, and they are not the people who gentrify it. I think they are the people who draw those who gentrify it.”Goldstein, who grew up in Cabbagetown, saw the effects of gentrification as a child. She said artists she knows from back then can’t afford to live there anymore.With her business being near the Atlanta BeltLine, she sees gentrification as a future for the area.“This being the last affordable segment of Atlanta is going to contribute to that. Like everything, it’s set up prime for it to happen,” Goldstein said. “You reach a point when some people are just interested in a trend, and it changes overnight … and that’s where hipster as a negative term comes in because they have the money and the resources and the flexibility to make that catastrophic redefinition of an area.”Whether you like hipsters or not, their impact is felt throughout Atlanta, leaving a lasting mark on the city.“It’s really our scene, our music scene, our food scene, our art scene, our fashion scene and how that really transcends to influence the entire country,” Cleveland said.Editor’s Note: Willow Goldstein’s title and the location of The Bakery has been updated since the previous version of the story. Anderson, who has taught a course at UCLA on the modern hipster called “Hip & Cool: A Study of Distinction & Exclusion,” said the subculture emerged from people wanting to be insiders on what’s hip.“It makes you special, and people want to be special, but they want to be special in ways that make them attractive,” Anderson said.For some hipsters, it’s having a limited-edition press. Criminal Records’ Sean Zearfoss said he’s found that hipsters tend to gravitate to the nostalgia of used records.“It’s like if I can have the first press of this record, I am definitely going to get the first press of this record instead of a brand new press,” he said.Criminal Records, located in Atlanta’s Little Five Points neighborhood, is a locally owned shop that sells vinyl, CDs and cassette tapes. Photo credit: Lauren BookerFor others, it might be buying a rare, vintage piece.“It’s dreaming about better times. So it’s fantasy. It’s drama. It’s thinking about life as if it’s a movie. It’s a creative experience,” said Jenn Bress, manager at vintage and modern clothing store The Lucky Exchange.She estimated that 35 to 40 percent of her customers are hipsters.An Economic ImpactAnderson said when hipsters pick up on trends, it can lead to the commodification of a certain product or service, like a latte from a local coffee shop.“The hipster gets stuff sold,” Anderson said.The subculture can help drive financial growth for local businesses and neighborhoods in Atlanta, according to Cleveland.“There is economic capital and power in the community, I think, that has been created around the hipster and creative culture. And so understanding that has made it more acceptable,” she said.Cafe Sunflower Buckhead’s General Manager Annie Sun said most of their customers are not vegan and come in to enjoy the ambiance and to taste popular dishes, such as the Sesame Soy Chicken and the Orzo Eggplant Lasagna. Dawn Porras owns the Joe’s East Atlanta Coffee Shop. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Add to My List In My List Sponsored Content The Orzo Eggplant Lasagna, Sunflower Burger and Crab Cakes are a few of the vegan selections offered at Cafe Sunflower Buckhead. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Pumakawa Navarro works at Joe’s Coffee. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Share Joe’s Coffee East Atlanta Village features an art piece on the shop’s ceiling and serves a range of drinks. Photo credit: Lauren Booker “Think of dropping a pebble into a pond or like still water…”– Terri Anderson, so… Read More You are in this catch-22 of describing yourself as the thing that you don’t like to separate yourself from it by sounding more pretentious than it is.-Willow Goldstein, the founder and creative director of The BakeryArguing whether hipsters and artists are or aren’t the same is a moot point “because it puts you in this box of being what you are arguing against,” according to Goldstein.The Ripple EffectThe subculture’s need for uniqueness stems from a ripple effect flowing from a pre-hip person (or a person who is an enthusiast about something) to hip groups to hipsters, according to University of California, Los Angeles sociology lecturer Terri Anderson. Joe’s Coffee East Atlanta Village features an art piece on the shop’s ceiling and serves a range of drinks. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Annie Sun is the General Manager at Cafe Sunflower Buckhead. Photo credit: Lauren Booker Sponsored Content “Think of dropping a pebble into a pond or like still water…”– Terri Anderson, sociology professor at UCLAlast_img read more

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Final PFC testing site in Shelburne shows results below limits

first_imgVermont Business Magazine Governor Peter Shumlin today shared the last set of results from a statewide plan to test for perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) at sites where the harmful chemicals may have been used. The former location of Harbour Industries in Shelburne was the final site tested for PFCs. Three out of four groundwater monitoring wells showed the presence of the chemicals PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid) and PFOS (perfluorooctanesulfonic acid), which are types of PFCs. PFOA levels ranged from 8 to 430 parts per trillion, and PFOS levels ranged from 9 to 300 parts per trillion. The Vermont health advisory limit is 20 parts per trillion. PFOA and PFOS are suspected carcinogens that were used widely in the US in a number of industrial processes.“The investigation has confirmed that any contamination is contained to very specific sites in the State,” the governor said. “Vermont is known for some of the cleanest drinking water in the country. Vermonters should continue to have confidence when they turn on the tap that their water is clean.” The vast majority of area residents and businesses are served by clean municipal sources of drinking water and are not impacted by the contamination. Three drinking water wells located within one mile of the site all tested clean for PFCs. Anyone who has a private drinking water well within a one-mile radius of the site at 4740 Shelburne Road that has not been tested should contact the Department of Environmental Conservation at (802) 828-1138.As with other sites where PFCs have been detected in groundwater supplies, the former Harbour Industries property will undergo a site investigation to determine the extent and degree of contamination in the area.”We remain committed to addressing any contamination that was discovered throughout this process,” said Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Alyssa Schuren.Statewide testing was launched after PFCs were found in Bennington, North Bennington and Pownal earlier this year. To date, 524 wells have been sampled in Bennington and North Bennington, and 259 have PFOA above the health advisory level of 20 parts per trillion. A municipal system serving Pownal, Fire District #2, was found to have PFOA at 27 parts per trillion. A filtration system has been placed on that municipal system, and area residents and businesses now have access to clean drinking water.Of the original plan to test eleven sites statewide, PFCs were found at five: the Vermont Army National Guard base (South Burlington); former Hercules Incorporated site (Colchester); IBM (Essex Junction); and Pittsford Fire Academy (Pittsford); and the former Harbour Industries site (Shelburne). In all cases, area private drinking water wells tested clean and/or clean municipal drinking water sources are available.The State has no plan to expand the testing of PFCs at this time. Precautionary testing will be required if information surfaces that indicates potential historic use of PFCs at any property.last_img read more

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Final site plan approved for Mission’s Gateway development; construction to start “as soon as possible”

first_imgA rendering of how the Gateway development will look.By Holly CookFinal development plans for the Mission Gateway site passed through the city’s Planning Commission Monday with a vote of 8-1.The $162 million project outlined during this week’s meeting was virtually the same as what was put before the Mission City Council in December 2016 by developer Tom Valenti of Cameron Group LLC.Plans include construction of a hotel, apartment building, restaurant and retail space and potentially an office building. The site will also include a partially free-standing parking structure and courtyard with seating and a performance area.Construction will roll out in three phases. The first phase will develop the apartment building with retail and restaurant space. The second phase will develop a 200-room Aloft and Element hotel and restaurant.The final phase will develop three buildings in the area previously slated for the Walmart Superstore at the corner of Johnson Drive and Roe Avenue. Walmart backed out as a potential tenant in October 2016. According to Valenti these three buildings will serve as “placeholders” until tenants are secured.Valenti said they would like to start the first phase of construction “as soon as possible” but did not provide details on a timeline. Previously Valenti had planned to initiate construction at the end of this month.The commission did not delve into a construction start date or how tax-increment financing (TIF) or community improvement district (CID) funds may be leveraged to finance the plans.Instead Monday’s discussion centered on a presentation of the modern-style design planned for the development.Buildings will be wrapped in corrugated metal, stained cedar, aluminum composite panels and precast concrete. The proposed color scheme used mostly blues and greys with a pop of canary yellow.City Planner Danielle Murray said the plans complied with Johnson Drive design guidelines.Planning Commissioner Robin Dukelow said she liked the usage of yellow as an accent color.“I think it’s kind of fun, but that’s just my opinion,” she said.Planning Commissioner Jim Brown said he did not care for the heavy usage of metal and voted against approving the plans for that reason.“It just seems like a lot of corrugated metal,” he said.City staff determined the sign criteria outlined in the plan was not sufficient and recommended the commission revisit that piece at a later time.Planning Commissioner Stuart Braden made the motion to accept the proposal, minus the sign component.last_img read more

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Awards

first_img Share NABC All-America First Team (1)2012-13 – Ellis Young IIINABC All-America Honorable Mention (1)2002-03 – Reginald Warren Daktronics All-South Region First Team (2)2011-12 – Jamar Moore2013-14 – Nate JohnsonDaktronics All-South Region Second Team (4)2002-03 – Reginald Warren2006-07 – Barry Durosier 2011-12 – Marquis Mathis2012-13 – Ellis Young IIINABC All-District South Region First Team (2)2002-03 – Reginald Warren 2012-13 – Ellis Young III NABC All-District South Region Second Team (2)2011-12 – Jamar Moore2013-14 – Nate JohnsonNCAA D-II Field Goal Percentage Champion (1)1997-98 – Anthony Russell (.643, 191-284)CoSIDA Academic All-District Team (1)2009-10 – Max HoggardGSC All-Academic Team (9)2004-05 – Josh Sullivan 2006-07 – Lucas Evangelista2007-08 – Lucas Evangelista (2)2005-06 – David Maddux2007-08 – David Maddux (2)2006-07 – Tyler Fleming2007-08 – Tyler Fleming (2)2008-09 – Max Hoggard2009-10 – Max Hoggard (2)GSC Player of the Year (1)2002-03 – Reginald Warren All-Gulf South Conference First Team (9)1994-95 – Noah Haynes 1994-95 – Terrance Harris1995-96 – Terrance Harris (2)1995-96 – Moochie Norris1996-97 – Jerry Fogle1997-98 – Anthony Russell 2002-03 – Reginald Warren 2011-12 – Jamar Moore2012-13 – Ellis Young III*Two-Time All-GSC First Team (1)1994-96 – Terrance HarrisAll-Gulf South Conference Second Team (14)1997-98 – Jerry Fogle1998-99 – Herb Montgomery1999-00 – Mike Morgan 1999-00 – Xon Williams2000-01 – Marcus Tanner2002-03 – Drew DeMond2003-04 – Kendrick Johnson2004-05 – Bryan Richardson 2006-07 – Barry Durosier2008-09 – Charles Bouie2009-10 – Maurice Thomas2010-11 – Marquis Mathis2010-11 – Jamar Moore2011-12 – Marquis Mathis2013-14 – Nate Johnson*Two-Time All-GSC (2)1994-96 – Terrance Harris1996-98 – Jerry Fogle2010-12 – Marquis Mathis GSC All-Tournament Team (2)2011-12 – Jamar Moore2012-13 – Peter Connole Print Friendly Version Awardslast_img read more

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Gamecocks football photos of the year

first_imgUSC quarterback Dylan Thompson (17) celebrates after running the ball in for the touchdown late in the third quarter against Georgia at Williams-Brice Stadium in Columbia on Saturday, September 13, 2014.last_img

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Starburst

first_imgBy Melissa MeehanTHE likes of Brad Pitt, George Clooney and Julia Roberts could be soon making their way to Pakenham…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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A writer’s dream

first_imgBy Bonny Burrows Children’s author Enid Blyton ignited Melisabeth Cooper Fell’s love of literature. The Pakenham woman and 2018 Writing…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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