Bristol scheme gets £27m boost

first_imgA pioneering rapid bus scheme in Bristol will be more than doubled thanks to a 27m grant from the government, Transport Minister Baroness Kramer announced yesterday (Tuesday).The MetroBus network will use dedicated busways to provide new express bus services into the city. The infrastructure will also boost existing bus services, which can use the busways to beat congestion.The new money will support the second phase of the Bristol MetroBus scheme and see the construction of another 3.1 miles of busways in the south of the city.The new South Bristol Link will connect to the Ashton Vale-Temple Meads MetroBus section already under construction. The rapid bus services will help encourage people to use public transport and cut congestion, while cycling and walking will be helped by the inclusion of safe, dedicated paths running alongside the routes.The MetroBus network is three bus routes: Ashton Vale-Temple Meads, North Fringe-Hengrove Package and South Bristol Link.Said Baroness Kramer: “This 27m will help transform travel around Bristol. The South Bristol Link will help get traffic off the roads, spark economic growth and link people to jobs. Our investment continues our commitment to help build stronger local economies, give our cities first-rate transport systems and benefit the UK as a whole.”The new scheme consists of a combined new road and rapid transit link to the south and west of Bristol city centre between the A370 Long Ashton Bypass and Hengrove Park. The Department for Transport will fund up to 27.6m towards the 43.3m total cost. The work is scheduled to be completed by November 2016.last_img read more

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Bluestar hosts taster day to get drivers on board

first_imgGo Ahead-owned Bluestar has been calling on local people to consider a new career as a bus driver. The Southampton-based operator held a taster day at the Ageas Bowl cricket ground on Saturday 23 January for would-be drivers to drive its vehicles around the specially laid-out course.Operations Manager Paul Coyne says: “Many people think that buses are difficult to handle, but we want to prove that once you get the hang of them they’re no more tricky than driving a car.”There was also a call-out for more female drivers. “As it stands, women are still vastly underrepresented in the industry across the UK. It would be great to see more women working in our business as drivers.“If people can drive a car, we’ll teach them the rest, and with the right training it’s far easier than they might think,” says Paul.“We wanted to give attendees a chance to see if they had the aptitude, and hope that many will apply to work with us in the future.”Those with a customer service or retail background were “particularly welcome”, he added.last_img read more

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A uniform approach to motivation

first_imgGood uniforms help with staff motivation and retention, says Susanne Malim, MD of Jermyn Street Design, which has just delivered new uniforms for First’s GWR rail franchise.“Whatever their shape, age or size, most people want to look fashionable and up-to-date in what they wear to work,” says Mrs Malim.The firm’s latest project is new uniforms for First’s GWR rail franchise“That’s why progressive companies recognise that stylish bespoke uniforms not only utilise good design in order to enhance functionality for everyday job roles, but they also help to give employees pride in their work.”She recommends a clear three-stage process – steering group, trial wear and communication – for the best results.“We encourage our clients to appoint a uniform steering group that can be consulted on key ‘fit for purpose’ questions across all staff job grades. “Once the designs have been finalised, they are made up in the specified fabrics, with the correct trims, and then tested by the staff – different ages, shapes and sizes, across all departments. “A wearer trial should last for a minimum of four weeks, so staff will wear and wash the workwear in the usual way. “It is important to create a clear wearer trial feedback form, which removes emotion from the comments. Once that feedback has been collated, the company can make key decisions about the new uniform range. “The last phase is for management to communicate the final results to staff in a way that gives them ownership and buy-in – and to announce the timescales and logistics for their new uniform launch.“When we launched the new uniform for Eurostar employees, the impact was immediate. “One employee who started her first shift in the new uniform just as another was ending a shift in the old one, said “it was just like in the Wizard of Oz, going from black and white to technicolour!”Visit www.jsd.co.uklast_img read more

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Airport route upgrades

first_imgLothian is introducing double-deckers to its Skylink 200 airport service in response to increasing demand.The North Edinburgh-Edinburgh Airport route, launched in April, now carries 10,000 people per week.The higher-capacity buses also meet Euro 6 and have been newly-liveried for this route.Lothian is also rebranding its route 35 to become Skylink 300 from 1 October.An investment of £6m, including £1.5m from the Scottish Green Bus Fund, will see 20 new hybrid buses introduced. The fleet offers USB charging, free WiFi, flight departure information and dedicated luggage areas.Fares to Edinburgh Airport on Skylink 300 will be brought into line with those on other airport services, “reflecting the improved vehicles operating on that route.” The timetable and fares for other parts of the route are unaffected.Richard Hall, managing director, Lothian said: “We’re delighted with how popular our Edinburgh Airport services are with customers. The introduction of these new and upgraded vehicles across both routes is the right time to simplify the range of options that we offer.“Edinburgh Airport is Scotland’s busiest airport and one of the fastest growing airports in the UK, especially for international flights, and we’ll keep working with its management to provide great connections for everyone who uses it.”In the last ten years Edinburgh Airport has invested £219m in new facilities, including £25m on the landside terminal extension and security hall. Lothian aims to provide flyers from the city with convenient and cost-effective options of travel to and from the airport, reducing the pressure from increased traffic on surrounding roads.Richard Townsend, director of Retail and Property, Edinburgh Airport said: “Making sure people can arrive at the airport and get into our stunning capital as quickly and smoothly as possible is key to a positive experience, and Lothian’s continued support in playing its part in that excellent local transport network is very much welcomed.“Their investment means they can now offer a fleet with the latest technology, including live departure information in a first for any airport service so customers can relax and enjoy the sights as they head back to Scotland’s busiest airport.”           The new services benefit air travellers, but also many of the airport’s employees, airline crew, RBS staff looking to travel to Gogarburn and students attending Edinburgh College, helping to reduce the carbon footprint of all these major businesses.last_img read more

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Tribunal fee ruling: The impact for operators

first_imgEmployment tribunal fees have been ruled unlawful. In the first of a regular column in routeone, Sam Murray-Hinde, partner at law firm Howard Kennedy, lays out the effect on coach and bus operatorsSam Murray-Hinde is an employment law expert at Howard KennedyThe Supreme Court has unanimously allowed Unison’s appeal against the legality of the Employment Tribunal and Employment Appeal Tribunal fee system, marking an end to the trade union’s four-year fight.The fees were ruled unlawful under both domestic and EU law, because they have the effect of preventing access to justice and the aims of the fee system do not justify this. The fees were introduced in 2013 with the aim of transferring part of the cost burden of the Tribunals from taxpayers to users of the service, to deter unmeritorious claims and to encourage earlier settlement.Unless the criteria for remission were met, claimants were required to pay a fee on presenting their claim to the Tribunal, and a hearing fee ahead of the claim being heard.  A successful party could request reimbursement of fees paid from the losing party.Since the fees were unlawful at the time they were introduced, the Supreme Court has ruled that they must be quashed. The consequence is that fees ceased to be payable from 26 July 2017.RefundsThe Government will need to refund millions of pounds worth of fees paid, but it remains unclear how this will work in practice and guidance is anticipated. The Tribunal Service will need to review all claims presented since 2013.It is inevitable that coach and bus operators will face an increase in claims, as there is now no financial disincentive to bringing proceedings and a claimant has little to lose. Even where a claim is unmeritorious, obtaining costs in the tribunal is seen as the exception rather than the rule and so an employer has limited recourse. Claims are also likely to take longer to conclude, as the Tribunal Service will be stretched administratively and this could lead to increased legal costs for operators. Tactically, settlement should be seen as a last resort with larger workforces, as there is an increased risk of opening the floodgates to claims; confidentiality clauses are often ineffective. Instead, operators should consider taking a robust stance and considering the merits of claim at the outset.More use should be made of applications for strike-outs where claims have no reasonable prospect of success, or where the claimant has failed to comply with orders. Seeking deposit orders is a useful tactic where claims have little reasonable prospects of success. Early costs warnings to claimants can lay the groundwork for costs applications on the conclusion of proceedings, albeit these need to be drafted carefully.Claims brought of timeIt will be interesting to see whether employees who were deterred by the fees from bringing a claim will argue that it was not ‘reasonably practicable’ to present their claim within the deadline or, in relation to discrimination claims, that it is ‘just and equitable’ to extend time. Disputes that operators thought had been concluded could be resurrected as a result.Each case would be decided on its merits, but the Tribunal Service will need to consider what evidence is required to show that, but for the fees, a claim would have been presented.In relation to current workforces, operators should already have in place and be following internal policies and procedures, as well as adhering to best practice. However, it may be a good time to evaluate the risks associated with any ongoing discipline or grievance matters, to include staff who are on long-term sick leave and address any staff training needs.The ruling will likely serve to enhance the union’s role in the workplace. Good industrial relations have always been vital for any business, but with tribunals now more accessible, operators would be well-advised to work more closely with recognised unions when dealing with contentious employee matters to attempt to resolve issues without recourse to litigation.last_img read more

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Antiques fairs return to British Motor Museum

first_imgFour antiques fairs will return to the British Motor Museum this year.The indoor fairs, organised by Field Dog Fairs, will be held on 10-11 February, 7-8 April, 7-8 July, and 24-25 November – the latter will be a Festive Antiques and Gift Fair, and the BBC filming for {Bargain Hunt} will take place on 7 April.Each event will offer a variety of stallholders from the world of antiques and collectables with an eclectic range of items.Charlotte Milford, Marketing Director for Field Dog Fairs, says: “Last year’s fairs were very popular, and we look forward to even bigger and better events this year.”last_img

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VDL backs up fuel economy promise on FHD2

first_imgVDL is now comfortable predicting 6.5% economy gain with new drivelineMoseley Distributors showed a pair of VDL Futura FHD2s in Dublin, one a demonstrator and the other in the livery of O’Shea’s of Kerry, and the Dutch manufacturer says that the latest-generation DAF/ZF driveline is delivering even better efficiency gains that first thought.When combined with predictive powertrain control (PPC), which optimises hill climbing to deliver the best economy, VDL originally said that a consumption reduction of 5.5% would be possible, with 3% of that coming from the driveline and 2.5% from PPC.Now, it says that is comfortable claiming a 6.5% like-for-like reduction after in-service trials.The 12.9m coach for O’Shea’s is the operator’s 18th VDL. Interest is also being received in the 13.5m, two-axle model, with two on order for Scottish buyers.last_img read more

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Chicago man sentenced to 50 years for Bar Louie parking lot shooting

first_imgIndianaLocalNews By Brooklyne Beatty – October 11, 2019 0 426 (Photo supplied/St. Joseph County Jail) The man found guilty in the 2017 shooting death of Benito Bueno has learned his fate.Oscar Orozco, 40 of Chicago, was arrested in February for Bueno’s death. Bueno died after being shot outside of Bar Louie at University Park Mall in Mishawaka back in June 2017.Last month, Orozco was found guilty of murder.RELATED: Chicago man charged with murder in Bar Louie parking lot shootingABC 57 reported Friday he was sentenced to 45 years for murder, plus five years for a firearm sentencing enhancement. Facebook Google+ WhatsApp Chicago man sentenced to 50 years for Bar Louie parking lot shooting TAGS2017Bar LouieBenito BuenoChicagoMishawakamurderOscar Orozcoparking lotsentencedshootingUniversity Park Mall Facebookcenter_img WhatsApp Google+ Twitter Pinterest Twitter Pinterest Previous articleNew River District project being considered in ElkhartNext articleIUSB Women’s Soccer Cancels Rest of Season Brooklyne Beattylast_img read more

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Where will you find Notre Dame on TV Saturday night?

first_img Facebook Twitter Notre Dame players celebrate after an NCAA football game against Michigan in South Bend, Ind., Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018. Notre Dame won 24-17. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya) You’ll have to hunt around a bit Saturday night to find the Notre Dame game, as the Fighting Irish will be making their debut on the ACC Network as they travel to Duke.The new network is owned by ESPN and you might be wondering if you get it. You can find out if your provider carries the channel by visiting https://getaccn.com/.This will be the only Irish football game on the channel this season, but a number of Notre Dame men’s and women’s basketball games will appear on the channel this year, as well. WhatsApp Google+ By Tommie Lee – November 5, 2019 0 544 Facebook WhatsApp IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend MarketSports Where will you find Notre Dame on TV Saturday night? Pinterest Previous articleMichigan deer crash statistics from 2018 show increaseNext articleBrian Boitano will come to South Bend for Howard Park opening Tommie Lee Pinterest Twitter Google+last_img read more

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MEPs threaten Byrne: ‘Ditch the credit law proposal or we’ll axe it’

first_imgGerman Christian Democrat Joachim Wuermeling was speaking after Byrne told the legal affairs committee that he had no intention of caving in to its demands to withdraw a proposal deemed by some deputies to be ridden with flaws and incompatible with existing EU and national laws. In a charged atmosphere, Byrne insisted the proposal was good and told MEPs to quit grumbling and instead start amending the content.Wuermeling told European Voice the full Parliament is still likely to vote in favour of a symbolic demand for Byrne to withdraw the proposal in their early November meeting. He admitted MEPs would then have no choice but to give in to Byrne’s demands if the Irishman refuses to yield.But the German rapporteur on the law said this would be the cue for the legal affairs committee to wield a hatchet against the draft law.“I think he is the only man in Europe who believes this is a good proposal. But, if he doesn’t withdraw it, then we will show no loyalty to it. To us it is more or less null. The legal affairs committee will feel completely free to redraft it.” MEPs question the draft’s attempt to harmonize national rules that are tailored to a myriad of different products. For instance, they argue it undermines rules in the UK which force credit card firms to offer high levels of protection to their customers.They also point out that parts of the proposals conflict with EU data privacy laws.Robert Coleman, ex-director-general of Byrne’s department, acknowledged the draft’s many shortcomings in a recent letter to deputies. Wuermeling said it was too early to detail what would get the chop, but that MEPs would certainly seek to exempt small loans from the rules. The requirement to set up national data banks of borrowers is another likely casualty because the private sector already operates them in most member states, he explained.At the same time, he said, the legal burden on lenders to act responsibly should be changed so that it is shared more fairly with borrowers.last_img read more

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