Wish you could learn from Questlove himself?

first_imgHolly BermanRolling Stone recently reported that Questlove, drummer of the Roots, will be teaching a course called “Classic Albums” at NYU next semester. The Vice President of A&R, Harry Weinger, will be teaching as well. The purpose of the class will be to explore “classic” as a genre, and define what really makes an album labeled as such. Aspects will include music, lyrics, production, and business to give a well-rounded view about where “classics”, like Zeppelin’s IV and Michael Jackson’s Off the Wall, really do come from. How cool does that sound?last_img

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Tiësto’s to release Club Life – Volume Three Stockholm

first_imgInternational superstar DJ and producer Tiësto announces the release of his new Mix album, CLUB LIFE – Volume Three Stockholm, via his own record label, Musical Freedom and is set for a digital release on June 18th, and CD release of June 25th. This follows 2012’s acclaimed CLUB LIFE – Volume Two Miami, which peaked at number 16 on the Billboard, Top 200 Chart. The third installment in Tiësto’s exciting CLUB LIFE series is inspired by Stockholm – one of dance music’s most important creative centers.Tiësto explains, “I moved to Stockholm in February 2009 and now spend several months there every year. The Swedes are enormously talented in fashion, music and art, which is extremely inspiring for me when I work on new tracks. There are also lots of great clubs within walking distance from the city center that makes Stockholm a very friendly place to party. This mix album perfectly encapsulates my Stockholm Club Life experience.”CLUB LIFE – Volume Three Stockholm offers a look into the pristine Scandinavian city from Tiësto’s view. As with the previous CLUB LIFE compilations, this third instalment leans heavily on Tiësto’s own exclusive original productions as the driving force behind the album. CLUB LIFE – Volume Three Stockholm is crafted with 90% exclusive material including Tiësto ft. Kyler England “Take Me,” Tiësto & DJ Punish “Shocker,” Tiësto, Mark Alston, Baggi Begovic & Jason Taylor “Love and Run ft. Teddy Geiger” (which debuted at Ultra), Tiësto & Dyro “Paradise” (also debuted at Ultra) and Tiësto & MOTi “Back To The Acid”CLUB LIFE – Volume Three Stockholm also offers an amazing selection of exclusive Tiësto remixes which you can’t hear anywhere else including Icona Pop “I Love It (Tiësto Club Life Remix),” Calvin Harris “Sweet Nothing ft. Florence Welch (Tiësto and Ken Loi Re-Remix),” Tiësto, Quintino & Alvaro “United (Tiësto & Blasterjaxx remix)” and “Tiësto & Calvin Harris “Century (Tiësto & Moska Remix)” In addition to his original tracks and remixes, Tiësto is using this album as a way to showcase his personal favorite tracks and emerging talent from his Musical Freedom label. Here, huge exclusives including Hardwell – Apollo ft. Amba Shepherd (Hardwell’s Club Life Edit),” Pelari “Cango” and Baggi Begovic “Compromise (ft. Tab)” meet head to head with club smashes Alesso vs One Republic “If I Lose Myself Tonight,” Moguai “Champs” and Tiësto’s own remixes of Passion Pit “Carried Away” and Zedd ft. Foxes “Clarity.”Check out a preview of the track “Take Me” featuring Kyler England:Download the 5-song album mini-mix here:last_img read more

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James Murphy Talks DFA, Career, and More in Interview with Red Bull Music Academy

first_imgThis past weekend, DFA Records celebrated its 12th Anniversary with a party at Grand Prospect Hall in Brooklyn with label artists James Murphy (co-founder/LCD Soundsystem), The Rapture, The Juan Maclean, Pat Mahoney, The Crystal Ark, YACHT, and several others.  The celebration, which was one of the events associated with Red Bull Music Academy‘s month long stay in New York City, went off without a hitch and was the talk of many local music heads that were lucky enough to be in attendance.James Murphy performed a particularly memorable set full of disco funk tracks that had everybody getting down.  Aside from his DJ set, Murphy also took part in a 90-minute interview as part of the Red Bull Music Academy New York 2013, in which he discussed everything from LCD Soundsystem, DFA, Yes (the band) and his affinity for them, how he would like to work with Fred Schneider of  The B-52′s to recreate the Public Enemy catalog, and growing up in a fairly strict household, among other things.He also discusses meeting David Bowie at Electric Ladyland (where he recorded “Fame”) and being in awe, and making sure not to ask too many questions.  It’s funny to watch Murphy’s facial expressions and body language while listening to “Fame” in the video and still being blown away by the track.  His take on punk rock is also pretty poignant, as he explains, “Punk rock to me was always outsiderness….When I first saw large-group, scene punk rock, I was repelled by it, because there were way too many people who agreed with each other.”Murphy also explains why finding success at a later age, and going through the tough times was “the best thing to ever happen to me,” as “if you get all the things that you’re supposed to look forward to, and that make you feel great, really early….you might not work out a lot of other stuff….some things that are more fundamental than people liking you.”It’s a very insightful interview that gives you an inside look into the brain of James Murphy and what influenced him growing up, which in turn made his music what it has become.  Definitely worth a watch/listen.To find out more about the Red Bull Music Academy, click here.You can listen to James Murphy’s Red Bull Music Academy’s 12 Years of DFA Set here:Check out the full 90-minute interview here:last_img read more

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KANYE WEST GETS PROBATION FOLLOWING ATTACK ON PAPARAZZI

first_imgKanye West is facing the music following an attack on a photographer at the Los Angeles International Airport this past summer.According to TMZ, on Monday, West’s lawyer entered a no contest plea—which is treated the same as a guilty plea for sentencing purposes—on behalf of the rapper.As part of the plea deal, West was sentenced to serve two years’ probation for the misdemeanor battery conviction.  In addition, he will be required to perform 250 hours of community service, complete 24 anger management sessions and pay restitution to the victim for damage to his camera as well as any medical bills he incurred.  West didn’t appear in court, but according to TMZ, the photographer, Daniel Ramos did, saying that he felt the rapper should be sent to jail and adding that he thinks West attacked him to generate press for his most recent album Yeezus.Check out a video of the attack below:-Sarah Compo (@sarahcompo)last_img read more

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What The Festival Confirms 2015 Lineup

first_imgWhat The Festival at Wolf Run Ranch in Oregon has confirmed their 2015 lineup. Big Gigantic, Odesza, GRiZ and Keys N Krates are among the many artists slated for the electronic-heavy festival. It’s going down June 19-22 and you can get tickets here.last_img

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Steve Kimock & Friends Announce Tour Dates

first_imgLegendary guitarist Steve Kimock has announced a brief East Coast tour, dubbed “In The Spirit Of The Sound.” The tour will focus on music of the Grateful Dead and Jerry Garcia, as well as some Kimock originals.Joining Kimock on tour will be Bobby Vega, Jeff Chimenti, Jay Lane, and Dan Lebowitz, along with special guests TBA throughout the run. The shows span from August 4th through the 8th, culminating in a set at the Bear’s Picnic event.Bear’s Picnic Reveals 10th Anniversary LineupYou can see the full tour schedule below, and find tickets via Kimock’s official website.Steve Kimock Tour DatesAugust 4 Washington, DC—The Hamilton August 5 New York, NY—Highline Ballroom August 6 Boston, MA—The Wilbur August 7 Woodstock, NY—Bearsville Theater August 8 Roaring Branch, PA—Bear’s Picniclast_img read more

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Listen To The Trippy New Single From Flying Lotus, Thundercat, Shabazz Palaces, George Clinton

first_imgFlying Lotus, Shabazz Palaces and Thundercat have formed a new supergroup called WOKE that taps into the hip hop, funk and electronic spheres, blending various styles into a unique new sound. Their first single just dropped on Adult Swim’s Singles series, and it’s a spaced-out, funky electro/hip-hop track featuring George Clinton on vocals.The project is the brainchild of pioneering producer Flying Lotus, who was actually discovered by Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim in 2006 when he submitted his music to the network based on a commercial prompt. The three artists have all collaborated and crossed paths many times. FlyLo and Thundercat both recently appeared on Kendrick Lamar’s acclaimed album To Pimp A Butterfly.Listen to “The Lavishments of Light Looking” below.last_img read more

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Portland Music Scene Comes Together After Fan’s Tragic Death

first_imgLoad remaining images Tragedy struck the Portland, Oregon music community on September 27th, 2015 when musician and live music lover Chris Chandler was killed in a hit-and-run outside of The Goodfoot Pub and Lounge, a beloved Portland venue.On Tuesday, October 6th, around 150 people gathered in a march that not only celebrated Chandler’s life, but also raised awareness for positive change. Friends and family created an organization called Speed Bumps for Chandler that aims to lobby the community to create safer streets outside of venues.The organization states: “Speed Bumps for Chandler is dedicated to mobilizing people, communities and governmental entities to improve and implement effective safety standards. Our main goal is implementing traffic calming devices near areas of public events. On September 27th, 2015, musician Chris Chandler was killed by a car outside of a music venue in Portland, Oregon. Speed Bumps for Chandler was created as a direct response to this tragedy. Please join us in helping to lobby for higher safety standards near venues to protect both artists and concert goers attending performances.”The local music scene came together at bottle shop Belmont Station, whose owner is also concerned about traffic and safety outside of her business. Bridgetown Brass led a parade for about a mile down the sidewalk to The Goodfoot, where there was a memorial featuring photos, candles, and a setlist from the last show Chandler attended.  That night, Portland-based band Radula performed, and invited several guest musicians to the stage.For more information about Chris and how you might help the cause, visit The Speed Bumps For Chandler website.last_img read more

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Watch The Muppets Get Wild With Cover Of Paul Simon’s ‘Kodachrome’

first_imgMusic has always been a big part of The Muppets. Throughout the ages, the Jim Henson characters have regaled us with videos covering all sorts of rock n’ roll classics, and the new ABC series is no exception. Earlier this week, the series rolled out an exciting video of the house band, Dr. Teeth & The Electric Mayhem, performing a version of “Kodachrome” by Paul Simon. The video features the other Muppet characters in the background, posing for photos to go along with the theme of the song. It’s a hoot for fans of the Muppets or of Simon.Watch the web exclusive video below:[H/T JamBase]last_img

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It took a novel tack to discover an obesity gene

first_imgThe gene huntUncovering genes that contribute to complex diseases could have life-altering consequences. People found to have a “genetic predisposition” to such diseases might be motivated to make smarter choices, reaching for a filet of fish rather than a burger, say, if obesity were written into their DNA. In the future, physicians may be able to screen individuals for susceptibility to a condition just by analyzing their genetic makeup, which could open the door to modifying lifestyles from an early age. Alas, the relationship between genes and complex diseases can be as murky as the Charles River. It’s not that a troublesome gene causes a complex disease; rather, in concert with other troublesome genes, it contributes to the possibility that, with the right environmental triggers, a person harboring it could develop a condition. But trying to pinpoint those genes along the full length of the human genome would be like trying to locate, say, Chicago, Reno, or Minneapolis on a cross-country drive from Boston to San Francisco with neither a map nor road signs, just miles of meandering highways. So scientists identified a series of landmarks–sites of common tiny variations in the genome called SNPs (“snips”), or single nucleotide polymorphisms–that mark the troublesome genes. All told, scientists have identified 8 million SNPs. Today, they can track a whopping 500,000 of them dotting the genome’s landscape–beacons of light shining on possible trouble spots. The most fruitful genetic studies rely on family members as subjects rather than the population at large. That’s because families share much of their DNA, so the number of genetic variables is reduced from the get-go. In these studies, researchers compare all 3 billion subunits of close relatives (say, parents and children) to each other, to see which of the 500,000 SNPs they share. Then, they cross-match those shared SNPs to the appearance of a trait–obesity, for instance–in the children. The degree of relatedness indicates how likely it is that the trait was inherited.Here’s where chance muddies the water. A scientist comparing the 3 billion subunits of a family member’s DNA to the 500,000 SNPs will invariably get a match, simply by chance. Chance matches turn gene searches into hit-and-miss propositions. While various studies have turned up putative genes for obesity, for example, their findings can’t be replicated.The insight that smacked Christoph Lange in the head out on the Charles takes chance out of the picture.What, Lange wondered, if researchers performed some statistical gymnastics before testing suspected genes against a trait, in order to whittle those 500,000 SNPs down to the 10 most likely to highlight the troublesome genes? By so doing, they could reduce the multiple-comparison problem to very manageable proportions. Here’s how Lange proposed to do that: First, researchers would pretend that the genetic makeup of the children was missing, and use genetic information only from the parents to surmise–using classic Mendel’s laws–what it might be. They could then calculate the likelihood of each of the 500,000 SNPs’ being passed on. “We wanted to estimate the heritability of each SNP,” says Laird. They would use the degree of heritability to calculate how much influence a gene associated with each SNP would have on a trait. Finally, they would rank the SNPs in order of influence. Selecting the 10 SNPs with the biggest influence, they could use just those to actually test against the trait in the children. The software program PBAT–which was developed at HSPH–was used to crunch those numbers. “Nan and Christoph are doing fundamental work in genetic epidemiology,” says James Ware, HSPH Dean for Academic Affairs and Frederick Mosteller Professor of Biostatistics. “By perfecting a method for solving the multiple-comparison problem, they have overcome a major statistical obstacle in the interpretation of whole genome scans.” Proof of conceptA paper in Science – powered by Lange and Laird’s statistical muscle and led by Boston University Medical School’s Alan Herbert and Michael Christman – identified a single gene variant associated with adult and childhood obesity. Its name is insulin-induced gene, or INSIG2, and it was present in 10 percent of the population that was tested. Searching for genes common to obese people, the researchers followed two generations of families enrolled in the Framingham Heart Study using data collected by the study’s originators. That information included the subjects’ genetic makeup and traits–in particular, their body mass index (BMI), a ratio of weight to height commonly used to assess obesity. Individuals with BMI greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2 are considered overweight, and those with a BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 are considered obese.Even before the Science paper, Laird and Lange had applied their new method to two studies at the Channing Laboratory at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, both of which sought–and found–genes associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. “Without Nan and Christoph’s statistical methodology, we may not have identified the associations,” says the Channing’s Edwin K. Silverman, senior author on both papers. But those studies considered a few hundred SNPs apiece. The obesity study looked at huge numbers–116,204, to be precise. “That was the proof of concept,” says Lange. The pi`ece de résistancewas being able to replicate the results of the obesity study in four subsequenttrials, each with a very different population–more than 10,000 individualsin samples of Western European ancestry, African Americans, and children. “Thereare no other common obesity gene-variant associations that are reproducible,”says Helen Lyon, of the Hirschhorn Laboratory at Children’s Hospital Boston,who led two of the replication studies. Adds James Ware, “Their methodologysets a new standard for documenting an association between genetic makeup anda health outcome.”The multiple-comparison problem has always been present in familial genetic studies, but its ability to muck up the works multiplied exponentially as the capabilities of DNA-SNP matching technology grew. As recently as 2003, testing 10,000 SNPs–which cover a small proportion of the genome–against human DNA was considered heroic.Today, researchers can investigate 500,000 SNPs at once, sweeping the entire genome like a Geiger counter sweeping soil. At their fingertips are computer-readable chips from Affymetrix, Inc., with 500,000 tiny test wells on their surface, about 20 for each SNP. The researchers simply apply sample DNA to the chemically treated wells and track the signals that go off, to see whether a SNP in the DNA coincides with a SNP in a particular well.Laird and Lange’s biostatistical breakthrough may have come just in time. Chips that can analyze a million SNPs at once are not far off.The two HSPH biostatisticians are deeply ensconced in unraveling the double helix further. They are working to find genes implicated in bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, and other complex diseases that develop in the place where genes and the environment meet.  “What’s the mission of public health?” asks Laird rhetorically. “One mandate is to understand the causes of human disease and disorders. To me, our findings address the research piece of that mission.” The racing sailboat was small, and Christoph Lange wanted to be sure he didn’t capsize and plunge into the Charles River again, as he’d done half a dozen times that spring. Using his blue sailing shoes for leverage, he carefully arranged himself on the craft’s cramped bench and reached for the tiller. The day was mild; the wind barely ruffled the dank water lapping the edges of the ramp that led to the Harvard Sailing Center, in Cambridge, where Lange, assistant professor of biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health, had been a member since 2000. “Perfect for thinking,” he noted to himself.Lange’s mind drifted to a knotty research problem he and scientists worldwide had been tangling with for years, one that severely hampered their ability to identify genes associated with complex diseases such as asthma, obesity, and cancer. Conditions like these arise from the interplay of DNA and a host of environmental factors, from air pollutants to diet. Linking genes and disease conditions wouldn’t seem to have much in common with games of chance. But from a statistical standpoint, the two are—to use a Mendelian allusion–like peas in a pod.How so? Consider this scenario: At a poker tournament, there are 500,000 players, and 500,000 decks of cards. Each of the players draws five cards from his or her own deck. Quite a few of the players get a royal flush, just by chance. Now, suppose that 20 of those decks are stacked. Again each of the 500,000 players draws five cards from his or her own deck. Again, quite a few get a royal flush. But now a mystery has arisen: Which of the royal flushes are due to chance (the ordinary decks), and which ones are due to stacked decks? Scientists looking for troublesome genes play a similar “game”: Using statistical tests, they compute the relationship of a person’s DNA–all 3 billion subunits of it–to 500,000 known variations in the human genome that signal troublesome genes to see if any of the subunits match up with the variations. Typically, each of the statistical tests will have a chance probability of 5 percent. That means that, for the 500,000 variations, there will be 25,000 chance matches. The mystery arises again: Which of those matches are due just to chance, and which are “real”–that is, due to a stacked deck (a troublesome gene)? How to sift through those 25,000 “hits” to separate the real from the chance ones has long been the Achilles’ heel of genetic studies. It is known in scientific circles as the “multiple-comparison problem.”Christoph Lange was mulling over this conundrum on that spring day in 2003 as the faint wind damped down to a whimper, leaving him stranded mid-river. And then it hit–his “Eureka!” moment: a way to cull the variations so only the most promising ones remained. It would be like thinning out a haystack, so the needles would glint in the sun. Lange nearly leaped out of the boat. “I was curious to see if the idea would work in practice, but couldn’t get to shore for an hour because there was no wind,” he says. “When I finally made it, I raced to my apartment, opened my laptop, and tried it. It worked fantastically. It was scary: It made sense that such an idea would work, but it seemed too good to be true.”In short order, Lange and HSPH colleagues Professor of Biostatistics Nan Laird and then-postdoctoral fellow Kristal Van Steen developed a statistical methodology that fundamentally changes the way scientists approach the multiple-comparison problem. And in a paper published in Science, they’ve identified a single gene associated with obesity–and proved that their strategy is reliable.last_img
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