Oil prices fall amid uncertainty over US China trade deal

first_imgInvestigators are trying to establish whether the tanker was hit by missiles, which could ratchet up tensions between Tehran and Riyadh if confirmed. But investors remained cautious given that few details emerged from the talks. Read more: Donald Trump reveals phase one trade agreement with China More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.com A good portion of those gains came on Friday, after an Iranian oil tanker was attacked off Saudi Arabia’s coast in the Red Sea. OANDA analyst Edward Moya said: “Oil is slowly giving up its recent gains as mini-trade deal scepticism is growing.” whatsapp Share US West Texas Intermediate was at $54.15 per barrel, down 1.01 per cent. There are also concerns that further escalation along the Syrian and Turkish border could impact output or exports from Iraq. “Since it will take about a month to finalize this partial deal, traders are remembering that we have seen things fall apart in shorter time periods.” The emergence of the first phase of a trade deal between the US and China, as well as a good will move by Washington to suspend threatened tariffs on Chinese products had initially lifted global financial markets on Monday. Read more: City of London Corporation looks east to China in post-Brexit planscenter_img “This appears to be similar to past trade talks where the situation appeared rosy, before eventually crumbling down again,” Phillip Futures said in a note. Both Brent and WTI futures rose more than three per cent last week. Oil prices fell this morning amid uncertainty over the first phase of a trade deal between the US and China. Markets were lifted two per cent by optimism over a thaw in the frosty relations by the end of last week, but Brent Crude was down 1.11 per cent this morning, valued at $59.84 per barrel. whatsapp Alex Daniel Monday 14 October 2019 9:33 am Oil prices fall amid uncertainty over US China trade deal Tags: Oil prices (Getty Images) last_img read more

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BBC warned to get ready for lower licence fee income by spending watchdog

first_img Killing Eve was a huge hit last year for the BBC throughout the first lockdown, but its licence fee income still fell Also Read: BBC warned to ready itself for lower licence fee income by public spending watchdog Killing Eve was a huge hit last year for the BBC throughout the first lockdown, but its licence fee income still fell Also Read: BBC warned to ready itself for lower licence fee income by public spending watchdog Public spending watchdog the National Audit Office (NAO) this morning released a report on the public broadcaster, saying the BBC “faces significant financial challenges” even before any change is made to licence fee decriminalisation. whatsapp New BBC director general Tim Davie set out four priorities upon joining the broadcaster last year: a renewed commitment to impartiality; a focus on unique, high-impact content; extracting more from online; and increasing commercial income. The BBC has been warned to match its priorities and future strategy with an assumption that licence fee income may fall further still. Killing Eve was a huge hit last year for the BBC throughout the first lockdown, but its licence fee income still fell Also Read: BBC warned to ready itself for lower licence fee income by public spending watchdog Negotiations between the media giant and the government over its funding model began in November, while Westminster is also mulling decriminalisation of not paying the licence fee. Fee income has already sunk eight per cent in two years to £3.5bn after some government funding was withdrawn. Josh Martin Killing Eve was a huge hit last year for the BBC throughout the first lockdown, but its licence fee income still fell More savings needed However, it may not be enough. The Beeb has said the latter would hit its finances by £1bn by 2027. Appearing in front of MPs, Sharp said he believed the licence fee was the “least worst” option and insisted it was fit for purpose. For three of the past five years, the BBC’s costs have outstripped its income, with it making a loss of £119m in 2019-20, which it plugged with a dwindling pot of cash reserves, the NAO report said.center_img Show Comments ▼ Details, please Tags: BBC BBC warned to ready itself for lower licence fee income by public spending watchdog Wednesday 20 January 2021 6:15 am Last week the incoming chair of the BBC Richard Sharp hinted at a possible overhaul of the licence fee funding model as he vowed to shake up the culture of the public service broadcaster. Gareth Davies, the head of the NAO, said: “The BBC faces significant financial challenges as it embarks upon licence fee negotiations and its mid-term charter review. It has made significant cost savings and has identified the need for more with licence fee income under pressure. But he said it “may be worth reassessing” the £157.50 annual charge at the corporation’s next review. The NAO said the BBC had already made signinficant cutbacks and, at around £618m already slashed from budgets, was on-track to meet a five-year goal to make savings of £800m by 2021/22. The Covid-19 pandemic, but also a long-term change in viewing methods and habits threaten to hit the BBC’s finances further. Share whatsapp by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeOne-N-Done | 7-Minute Workout7 Minutes a Day To a Flat Stomach By Using This 1 Easy ExerciseOne-N-Done | 7-Minute WorkoutBlood Pressure Solution4 Worst Blood Pressure MedsBlood Pressure SolutionBrake For ItSay Goodbye: These Cars Will Be Discontinued In 2021Brake For ItMoneyWise.comMechanics Say You Should Avoid These Cars In 2021  MoneyWise.comQuizscape8 Out Of 10 Men Fails This Car Engine Quiz. Can You Pass It?QuizscapeThe Legacy ReportMan Who Predicted 2020 Crash 45 Days Early Issues Next Major WarningThe Legacy ReportMoney PopThe Most Overpriced Vehicles On the Market Right NowMoney PopAtlantic MirrorA Kilimanjaro Discovery Has Proved This About The BibleAtlantic MirrorLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver Health However, the public spending watchdog wants Davie to spell out exactly how those goals will be funded as well as provide another savings target. “As decisions about the licence fee are made, the BBC needs to develop a clear financial plan for the future setting out where it will invest and how it will continue to make savings. Without such a plan, it will be difficult for the BBC to effectively implement its new strategic priorities.”last_img read more

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Music Video Monday: Annette Funicello – “Jamaica Ska”

first_imgUncategorizedMusic Video Monday: Annette Funicello – “Jamaica Ska”Some things live forever; beach blanket movies are one of themBy Elina Shatkin – April 9, 2013666ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItDick Clark was known as America’s Oldest Teenager, but in truth that title belonged to Annette Funicello. A former Mouseketeer who matured into a pop star and teen idol, she was known for her string of 1960s beach blanket movies. Her wholesome image and bikini-clad figure helped popularize California surf culture in the rest of the country and made her a matinee queen.In 1987 at age 45, looking as pert and cheerful as ever, Funicello riffed on her past success and her lingering image in Back to the Beach. There she is in a flirty, polka-dot sundress singing and gamely attempting to skank. “Not many people can do the Cha Cha Cha. Not everybody can do the twist. But everybody can do the Jamaica Ska. It’s a new dance you can’t resist.”Annette Funicello passed away today at the age of 70 from complications of multiple sclerosis. May she ride the great wave into the sky. TAGSAnnette FunicelloJamaica SkaL.A. CultureMusicMusic VideoMusic Video MondaySkaPrevious articleRemembering Margaret ThatcherNext articleFashion Is A TripElina Shatkin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORA Hip-Hop and R&B Fest Coming to L.A. in December Has a Ridiculously Stacked LineupSong Catalogs Are Selling for Big Bucks, but Will the Trend End on a Bum Note?Coachella Sets a Date for Its 2022 Comebacklast_img read more

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Six L.A. Coffee Shops Where the A/C Is as Satisfying as…

first_imgUncategorizedSix L.A. Coffee Shops Where the A/C Is as Satisfying as the CoffeeStarbucks is not your only optionBy Jessica P. Ogilvie – June 23, 20161075ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItThis week’s heat wave hit us like an unusually heavy pillow at a slumber party. Unprepared for such force, many of us sweated it out in our standard coffee haunts, braved it in our own homes, or—just as painfully—froze to death in over-air-conditioned offices.But when the high temperatures return this weekend, we will be ready. We will know which coffee shop to go to, laptop in tow, that will keep the indoor temp at a civilized level while still serving a delicious almond milk iced latte. Because we all know that the Starbucks (and Coffee Beans and Peet’s) of the world are air conditioned, but with their depressing background music, constant ruckus, and clinical-in-its-sameness design, they don’t make for the most inspiring afternoons. Plus, let’s be real—Starbucks’ coffee isn’t actually that good.Instead, here are six coffee shops that will allow you to sit in front of your MacBook for hours, in a reasonable—and workable—atmosphere.Santa Monica/VeniceDogtown Coffee: It can get a little crowded in this Main Street shop, but when it comes to places where you can chill (literally) and get some work done, it’s tough to beat. Plus, they have all your snacking needs covered, from the epic breakfast burrito to the sea salted caramel latte.Mid-CityPaper or Plastik: Situated on a still-up-and-coming stretch of Pico Bouvlard, Paper or Pastik has great ambiance, plenty of seating and excellent quiche. The only catch here is that a handful of tables are “no-laptop zones” — so be sure to check the signs before you set up camp for the afternoon.BurbankCoffee Commissary: This Fairfax Avenue favorite also has an outpost in Burbank, and it’s just as outstanding. Between the pork belly burrito, avocado toast and homemade biscuits, you will not go hungry, even as you slowly, painstakingly dry out your underboob sweat.LarchmontGo Get ‘Em Tiger: Once lauded by the Grey Lady herself for having the best lattes in the country, Go Get ‘Em Tiger offers up a macadamia nut concoction that will make you wonder why you wasted so many hours drinking lattes with plain old cow’s milk (amateur hour!). One thing to know before hitting up this Larchmont location: Order as if you were at a bar. There is no line; just walk up to the counter and wave someone over.Echo ParkWoodcat Coffee Bar: Located on Sunset just east of Echo Park Boulevard, this cozy shop is hipster central; but their iced lattes are the best in the neighborhood. Word to the wise: If you’re going to be there for a few hours, try to get there early, as there are limited outlets. But it is SO WORTH IT.DTLAVerve: This bright, airy shop, located on Spring Street, has plenty of table space, so you’ll never feel cramped or forced to sit through your neighbor’s script brainstorming sesh. The Santa-Cruz based company has a near-cult like following, and you are guaranteed to stay buzzy and alert as you hide from the UV. TAGSAir ConditioningCoffeeCoffee CommissaryDogtownGo Get Em TigerHeat WaveVervePrevious article12 Things You Need to Do This Weekend, 6/23Next articleThe Love Story Behind Michael Stars Will Make You Like Their Clothes Even MoreJessica P. Ogilvie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORCoffee and Grapefruit Juice? It’s a Surprising Thirst QuencherEagle Rock’s Newest Cafe Is Co-Owned by Issa RaeHow Quickly Will L.A.’s Booming Coffee Shop Culture Bounce Back?last_img read more

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College students try to hack a gene drive — and set a science fair abuzz

first_img By Ike Swetlitz Dec. 14, 2016 Reprints Hacking life: Scientists ‘recode’ DNA in step toward lab-made organisms But exactly what that care should consist of is a subject still in flux, even among biosecurity experts. Some of the preeminent scientists in the field of gene drives authored a Science paper last year laying out safeguards, but without any laws or regulations governing the work, a scientist can always buck the advice of her colleagues.The do-it-yourself biology community, where members of the public can tinker with genes and cells, has its own patchwork of experiences with the cutting-edge technology. Maria Chavez, a board member of BioCurious in Silicon Valley, said that nobody in her community has asked to do projects involving gene drives, and that if someone did, “we would have to have a long conversation with them,” and the lab’s safety committee would have to sign off on the project, as is required for all projects. Shaun Moshasha, founder of Open Bio Labs in Charlottesville, Va., said his facility doesn’t allow gene drive research to take place.iGEM’s safety committee has also pondered the possibility of gene drives in the past. The team, which includes professors and regulators from around the world, sits down every year with regulators and law enforcement personnel for a private meeting to discuss how to handle emerging biotechnologies. Last year, gene drives came up.But at that time it had only been eight months since the first published paper describing this type of gene drive in yeast. Oye wasn’t expecting undergraduates to make an attempt until at least 2017. It’s a technology that scientists say could fundamentally alter entire populations.The Pentagon has expressed alarm about what terrorists might do with “gene drives.” Meanwhile, scientists are researching how they could be used to stop the spread of intractable diseases like malaria.So how did a group of college students come close to creating a gene drive as part of a science competition?advertisement Tags biotechnologygeneticsresearch Related: Oye said that the 2015 meeting was an “exploratory” discussion about what to do about gene drives, but they didn’t make a formal decision.Esvelt, who attended the 2015 safety meeting as an advisor, remembers it differently. He said they reached an agreement: no gene drives at iGEM.If that was iGEM policy, it was not communicated to the Minnesota undergraduates. They were unaware that their project might attract such attention until they arrived in Boston in October.“We were very surprised at the interest in our project,” said Kathryn Almquist, a sophomore on the team. “We didn’t realize how big of a deal this was.”The University of Minnesota students’ research poster describes their attempt to create a reversal drive. University of Minnesota iGEM teamDriving onwardIn the weeks since this year’s competition, iGEM organizers have set down a detailed policy on how their students should approach gene drives.From now on, any team who wants to do a project involving gene drives must participate in a video conference with experienced gene drive researchers to discuss the safety procedures they are using for their project and will also be required to agree to safeguards laid out in the 2015 Science paper, including strict review of protocols by biosafety authorities; using molecular techniques to ensure that, even if organisms escape, their gene drives won’t spread; and a ban on transporting organisms with gene drives from one lab to another. Information on iGEM’s website will make clear that working with gene drives requires special clearance. And iGEM’s biological warehouse, from which teams can order parts, will not stock off-the-shelf gene drives.Meanwhile, for the Minnesota students in the center of the storm, there are mixed feelings about the work they’ve done so far, and what comes next.“We hadn’t really anticipated how much of an impact this would have,” Almquist said. She said she was relieved that they didn’t end up assembling the complete gene drive: “We are maybe not experienced enough to be dealing with [this technology].”Meanwhile, sophomore Ajinkya Limkar said that the controversy inspired by their project has only motivated him further.“It was, I guess you could say, a great feeling, that what you’re doing can have the potential to change the world, and hopefully for the better,” Limkar said. He thinks the team may continue the project next year.And whatever the outcome for these students’ project, it’s not the last time gene drives will come up — at iGEM or outside it.“These are kids,” Oye said. “If they can do stuff, you know it’s coming soon, and it’s likely to be something that would be relatively common.” It started innocently enough. The team of students at the University of Minnesota were looking for a project to enter into the the international synthetic biology competition iGEM. Some were taken by a paper by George Church, the famed Harvard geneticist, that described how a gene drive worked and how to build one.A gene drive is a sequence of DNA inserted into a cell that “drives” certain genes through the entire population by forcing them into every offspring.advertisement Meanwhile, iGEM safety officials were keeping a close watch from a distance. They knew about the project before the competition — teams have to upload information about their work to a wiki — and they understood that the team had taken safety precautions, so there was no immediate danger, said Kenneth Oye, an MIT political science professor and cochair of iGEM’s safety committee. But the title of their project — “Shifting Gene Drives Into Reverse: Now Mosquitoes Are The Yeast Of Our Worries” — indicated that other organisms might be on the table.So when, on the afternoon of Sunday, Oct. 30, the Minnesota team stood in front of hundreds of students, faculty advisors, and judges to give their research presentation, there were a lot of questions to answer. And most of those questions involved safety.Oye was one of the questioners. His motives, he said, were twofold: to make sure the team knew what they were doing and to send a public message to the other students in the room.“There was a larger purpose: to make clear to everyone in the room that this is something you don’t screw around with,” Oye said. “Let me rephrase that. This is a technology [for which], even if you’re simply investigating and researching, care is required.” Kenneth Oye, cochair of iGEM’s safety committee “We thought it was super cool, but we immediately started thinking of some of the negative implications,” said Sarah Lucas, at the time a junior and the leader of the team.Because the gene drive forces specific genes to spread quickly through a population, an accidental — or intentional — release of an organism with a gene drive could have massive ecological effects. So, the team decided to build a “reversal drive,” which could undo the effects of a gene drive.The students fell short of creating an actual gene drive. But they came close enough to demonstrate that you may not have to be a scientist or academic researcher to change the genetics of an entire population. MIT professor Kevin Esvelt, a gene drive expert, told STAT that this project was not dangerous — but that any undergraduates who want to attempt such work in the future should talk to someone like him first, a recommendation iGEM is adopting as policy.“The dangers are that [a] team is working on a project that either accidentally or deliberately results in something getting outside the lab,” said Piers Millett, director of safety and security for the competition. No countries have laws governing how gene drives can or cannot be used in the lab, Millett said.In the weeks since the competition, iGEM’s safety board has established a policy about how students can work with gene drives, and what they should do to prevent accidental release. The guidelines could become a global model.“I know some government regulators will be watching very closely about how this is dealt with inside of iGEM,” Millett said, noting that some members of iGEM’s safety committee work for regulatory agencies, for instance in Canada and the Netherlands.Students from the University of Minnesota present their project at the iGEM competition in Boston. From left to right, Kathryn Almquist, Carolyn Domroese, Ajinkya Limkar, Sarah Lucas, Chase Bowen, and Sophie Vrba. Justin Knight/iGEM Foundation ‘The yeast of our worries’The group of students first started mulling the creation of a gene drive in the spring with the aim of mitigating its risk, not amplifying it, by building a “reversal drive,” which could undo the effects of the gene drive. Such a reversal drive had been built in yeast last year, but the students were unaware of that at the time.iGEM has a library of off-the-shelf parts that the teams can order, but the gene drive was not one of them, so the team had to figure out how to build it themselves. They downloaded the genetic sequence for a gene drive from the supplement to a Church paper, chopped it in half, and sent it away to a DNA synthesis company that provides free DNA to iGEM teams. They also designed a reversal drive and sent away the sequence, divided into thirds. (The drives themselves were too big for the synthesis company to print as whole elements.)And the students did take precautions.They planned to use a so-called “split drive” configuration, where most of the gene drive would be put into the yeast’s genome, while a key component was isolated in a separate bit of DNA. Even if the yeast escaped, both components of the drive would not spread to all of the offspring. They also used a special strain of yeast that can only survive if it’s constantly fed four lab-provided amino acids, minimizing the chance of an escaped yeast cell surviving in the wild.The students spent the next few months trying to stitch the pieces of the drives together, stymied by contaminated lab equipment and a fridge that wasn’t cold enough. By the time they had to submit their work for the October competition, they had only managed to assemble two of the three parts of the reversal drive, and none of the gene drive. “There was a larger purpose: to make clear to everyone in the room that this is something you don’t screw around with.” Related: College students worked with yeast cells like these, attempting to insert a “gene drive.” Juergen Berger/Maria Langegger via NIH George Church has a wild idea to upend evolution. Here’s your guide In the LabCollege students try to hack a gene drive — and set a science fair abuzz Related: Audacious project plans to create human genomes from scratch last_img read more

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Jury selection begins in Derek Chauvin’s trial in the death of George Floyd

first_imgRELATEDTOPICS DOJ to investigate Minneapolis policing practices after ex-officer convicted of murder April 22, 2021 May 9, 2021 “No matter what a potential juror has seen or heard, can they set that aside and base their decision on evidence in court and the law the judge gives them?” said Mary Moriarty, the former chief Hennepin County public defender. Prospective jurors were sent a 16-page questionnaire about their thoughts on policing, personal interactions with police and Black Lives Matter protests. On Monday, potential jurors who completed the questionnaire will be questioned one-by-one in court in a process known as voir dire. Juror information will be kept anonymous. The judge will first ask questions of the prospective juror, followed by the defense and then the prosecution. If the defense or prosecution believes the person cannot be impartial in the case, they can ask the court to dismiss the person for cause. Each side has unlimited challenges for cause.Prosecutors and defense attorneys can also move to dismiss prospective jurors without cause using what’s called a peremptory challenge. Chauvin’s team has 15 of these challenges and the prosecution has nine, according to the court.These peremptory challenges can themselves be challenged, though, if they are based on race, ethnicity or sex — known as a Batson challenge.The process continues until the court decides on up to 16 people, split into 12 jurors and up to four alternates.The-CNN-Wire™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved. 4 ex-Minneapolis cops indicted on civil rights charges in George Floyd’s death AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments First juror in Derek Chauvin trial speaks out: “It felt like every day was a funeral” April 29, 2021center_img CNN – Jury selection begins Monday in Derek Chauvin’s trial in the death of George Floyd. Floyd, who was a 46-year-old Black man, died on May 25, 2020, after Chauvin placed his knee of Floyd’s neck for nearly 8 minutes while Floyd repeatedly said ‘”I can’t breathe.” Chauvin was a Minneapolis Police officer at the time. Floyd’s final moments were caught on video, and his death led to protests across the nation against police brutality and racism under the banner Black Lives Matter as well as unrest and looting.Chauvin has pleaded not guilty to second-degree unintentional murder and second-degree manslaughter charges. AdvertisementTags: George Floyd Festival honoring George Floyd to be held on street where he took his last breaths May 26, 2021 Advertisement AdvertisementJury selection will take place at the Hennepin County Government Center and is expected to last about three weeks. Subsequently, opening statements will start no earlier than March 29 and take two to four weeks.Since the case has garnered a swell of media attention, finding a jury that hasn’t heard about the case could be next to impossible. However, the goal is not to find people ignorant of the case, but to find jurors who are impartial and open to hearing evidence. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Student nurses and midwives to receive backdated promised €100 pandemic grant

first_img Electric Picnic Student nurses and midwives to receive backdated promised €100 pandemic grant Pinterest Facebook Electric Picnic RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Student nurses and midwives are set to receive a backdated promised Pandemic Placement Grant of €100 per week by June 1.The payment applies for weeks when the students in question were on placement in health care settings during the pandemic, and was recommended in a review by Professor Tom Collins.The INMO believes that the majority of student nurses would have worked for at least eight weeks on placement over recent months but in some cases students could have been on placement for between 12 and 15 weeks.The total cost of the payments is expected to be some €5 million.Local Senator O’Loughlin praised the students for overcoming unprecedented challenges posed by Covid-19 during their studies.She confirmed that that the payment for the relevant placement weeks would be backdated to September of last year.She said: “A longer-term review of supports in place for nursing and midwifery supernumerary student clinical placements is being conducted by Sean McHugh and will include an examination of the levels of pay for the final year internship, and the travel and accommodation allowances.“Recommendations are due by 30 June and it is hoped that the new arrangements will be in place for the next academic year.“The government has also pledged that all of this year’s nursing and midwifery graduates will be offered permanent contracts in the public health system.”SEE ALSO – WATCH: Portlaoise Hospital launch midwifery-led clinic on International Day of the Midwife Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 months Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival Pinterest Previous articleDeaths in Laois – Tuesday, May 11, 2021Next articleJOB VACANCY: Heywood Community School seeking to hire part-time cleaner Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date WhatsApp Facebook Twitter By Alan Hartnett – 11th May 2021 Home News Community Student nurses and midwives to receive backdated promised €100 pandemic grant NewsCommunity Council Twitter TAGSFiona O’Loughlinnurses last_img read more

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2006 Bird Shooting Season Opens on Saturday

first_imgAdvertisements Related2006 Bird Shooting Season Opens on Saturday FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The 2006 bird-shooting season will open this Saturday (Aug.19), with Minister of Local Government and Environment, Dean Peart having signed the necessary orders under the Wild Life Protection Act for hunting to begin.Zadie Neufville, Public Education Officer at the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA) told JIS News that the season would end on Sunday, September 24 and shooting would only be allowed on weekends, that is, Saturday mornings from sunrise to 9:00 a.m. and again in the afternoon from 2:30 p.m. to sunset. On Sunday mornings, shooting is allowed from sunrise to 9:00 a.m.She explained that only four types of birds might be shot – the pea dove, the white-winged dove, the baldpate and the mourning dove. “There is also a bag limit of 20 birds per shoot, that is, 20 birds in the morning, 20 birds in the afternoon, except where the white crown pigeon is concerned, you will shoot only 15 of those birds,” she advised.“We also require that a fully-feathered wing be kept of each bird shot.This is used to collect age information from the bird. A general bird population count is being done, which will inform scientists and legislators as to what happens for each season,” Miss Neufville informed.In addition, the Public Education Officer revealed that there was an increase in the cost of the hunter’s licence from $7,000 to $8,000. “A hunter’s licence is needed to shoot bird during the season in addition to a shotgun permit,” she told JIS News, adding that, that the hunter’s licence can only be purchased through NEPA and/or authorized distributors. We have a schedule of those on the website, www.nepa.gov.jm, so you can see where it is that you can purchase these permits”.Meanwhile, Miss Neufville reminded hunters to adhere to the regulations of the Wild Life Protection Act, noting that the Island Special Constabulary Force (ISCF) and NEPA, along with Wild Life Wardens, would be monitoring shooting areas to enforce the Act.“We are going to be out there in our numbers and we are going to be prosecuting anybody caught breaking any aspect of the Act. The maximum fine for breaching the Wild Life Protection Act is $100,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year or both,” she stated. Related2006 Bird Shooting Season Opens on Saturdaycenter_img 2006 Bird Shooting Season Opens on Saturday UncategorizedAugust 17, 2006 Related2006 Bird Shooting Season Opens on Saturdaylast_img read more

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Reporting wage theft in WA

first_imgReporting wage theft in WA Western Australian workers can find out how to report deliberate underpayment of wages or entitlements at www.wagetheft.wa.gov.au.The Reporting wage theft in Western Australia website assists workers with how to:seek help with resolving an underpayment issue or unpaid annual or long service leave;report wage theft anonymously to the relevant government department; orseek help with unpaid superannuation.Visit www.wagetheft.wa.gov.au /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Australian, Government, Industry regulation, superannuation, theft, underpayment, visit, wage theft, website, Western Australialast_img read more

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CU-Boulder alum and NASA astronaut Steve Swanson heading for space station

first_imgSteve Swanson Published: Jan. 22, 2014 Making his third flight as a NASA astronaut, University of Colorado Boulder alumnus Steve Swanson will blast off for the International Space Station aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 25.Swanson, who earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering physics from CU-Boulder in 1983, will serve as flight engineer for Expedition 39, which already will be underway on the ISS. In late May, Swanson, who considers Steamboat Springs, Colo., his hometown, will become space station commander as Mission 40 begins on the ISS.Swanson previously flew on the STS-17 mission aboard the space shuttle Atlantis to the ISS in June 2007 to deliver a truss segment, solar arrays, batteries and associated equipment. Swanson participated in two spacewalks totaling 13 hours and 45 minutes during the mission, the 21st shuttle mission to the orbiting station and which returned to Earth with Swanson and his fellow astronauts 14 days later.He also flew on the STS-19 mission aboard Discovery in March 2009, delivering the final starboard truss segment and the final set of solar arrays and batteries, all of which were installed during spacewalking trips by Swanson and two astronaut colleagues. Swanson spacewalked for 12 hours and 37 minutes on the 13-day mission.Swanson will be launched to the ISS in March aboard the Soyuz spacecraft along with cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev of the Russian Federal Space Agency. Expedition 39, which will be commanded by Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakatato, will end in May, when Expedition 40 begins with Swanson as commander.  Swanson, who participated in a NASA news briefing today at the Johnson Space Center in Houston along with cosmonauts Skvortsov and Artemyev, said one aspect of being an astronaut he particularly likes is floating in the nearly weightless environment of space. “I enjoyed it tremendously on my last mission,” he said. “It was like being a kid on the best playground in the world.”The astronaut crew will be involved in dozens of research experiments in the low gravity of the ISS, including efforts related to protein crystal growth, capillary blood flow, gravity sensing by plants and muscle and bone loss changes in space. Swanson and the two cosmonauts will return to Earth in September.“Steve is a Coloradan and CU alum and I know that like many of us, he’s a camping enthusiast,” said CU-Boulder Scholar in Residence and former astronaut Jim Voss, who received his master’s degree in aerospace engineering from CU-Boulder in 1974. “After making two shuttle flights where he camped out for a week or so, he’s now going to the International Space Station where he gets to camp out and work for six months.“Based on my time living on ISS, which was a wonderful experience, I know Steve will enjoy his mission, but he’ll be ready to come back to Colorado when his expedition is over,” said Voss, who flew five space shuttle missions and logged 201 days in space — primarily on the ISS — including four spacewalks totaling more than 22 hours. “Steve will be a great ambassador for Colorado and our nation while he is orbiting the Earth.”Eighteen CU-Boulder astronaut-affiliates have flown 47 NASA space missions beginning with the late Scott Carpenter in 1962. Former NASA astronaut Joe Tanner, currently a senior instructor in CU-Boulder’s aerospace engineering sciences department and who is teaching and mentoring undergraduate and graduate students in space systems design, flew four space shuttle missions, including one to refurbish the Hubble Space Telescope in 1997 and two to the ISS.  To watch a video of Swanson talking about his NASA experiences and his passion for Colorado’s outdoors visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KU53X7O7z7w.Contact: Jim Scott, CU-Boulder media relations, [email protected] Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail “Steve is a Coloradan and CU alum and I know that like many of us, he’s a camping enthusiast,” said CU-Boulder Scholar in Residence and former astronaut Jim Voss, who received his master’s degree in aerospace engineering from CU-Boulder in 1974. “After making two shuttle flights where he camped out for a week or so, he’s now going to the International Space Station where he gets to camp out and work for six months.”last_img read more

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