Senate appoints Executive Council nominations, passes resolution supporting No Shave November

first_imgThe Notre Dame student senate met Wednesday to decide on the nomination of two new members to the Student Executive Cabinet for the remainder of the 2019-2020 Academic term. Student Body President Elizabeth Boyle, a senior, and Student Body Vice President Patrick McGuire, a junior, were patrons of the nominations.The nominated candidates were Katherine Wallace for director of academic affairs and Tiffanie Cappello-Lee for press secretary & director of communications. McGuire read the cases to be made for each of the candidates.“We have selected Katherine to be the director of academic affairs because she is a passionate, committed, experienced and talented student leader who serves with focus and enthusiasm,” McGuire said. “Katherine is a current member of the Academic Affairs Department who brings Executive Cabinet leadership experience as the director of athletics emeritus. Katherine, a member of the Notre Dame fencing team, is also a member of the Student-Athlete Advisory Council. She has served as a McWell Thrive leader and is a Notre Dame Monogram recipient. Katherine has performed in each of these roles with exceptional skill, diligence and leadership capability.”As Wallace was not present at the meeting due to a scheduling conflict, the Senate could not ask her any questions directly. McGuire addressed the potential concern about her absence by saying she would be available over email and a deputy director will later be appointed as well.“[I’ve] also had some good discussions about the fact that it’s important for a director to be at Senate which is a very genuine and important concern,” McGuire said. “Good thing is, even if in the future Catherine is unable to make meetings because of practice, we are also appointing a deputy director of Academic Affairs learners, so, if something like this were to happen again, there would still be representation from the department.”The Senate quickly moved through Wallace’s nomination and confirmed her. They then moved onto the next candidate, Cappello-Lee.“[Cappello-Lee] has a deep dedication to service, justice and excellence,” McGuire said. “On campus, Tiffanie [Cappello-Lee] has served as a research assistant in Dr. Michale Ferdig’s malaria genetics and genomics research lab and a co-coordinator for the Global Health Conference. Tiffanie [Cappello-Lee] is a Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar, a member of the Glynn Family Honors Program, and a Sorin Fellow in the Center for Ethics and Culture.”Beyond campus, Cappello-Lee does pro-bono consulting for Mercy Homes for Boys and Girls, conducted research on the environmental impact of dietary changes in China and water pollution’s impact on health in Hong Kong, and has conducted extensive research in Ottawa and Santiago, Chile, McGuire said.“She has also interned at the management consulting firm AArete,” he said. “Through these experiences, she has gained and honed her skills of marketing, team building, research, writing, and consulting — all skills that will prove essential to her role as press secretary and director of communications.”Cappello-Lee was present at the meeting, and Senate only had one question. Sam Cannova, junior class council president, wanted to gauge her decision-making process in a very specific, high-stress environment.“As I’m sure we all know, Notre Dame lies on the Indiana fault line,” Cannova said. “We have a Radiation Laboratory on campus. Further, one of the typical roles with the press secretary and director of communications is to cover all sorts of news. One of the frequent stories usually takes Elizabeth and a director of comms slash press secretary to the Radiation Laboratory. So, in the event that you were in the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory with Elizabeth [Boyle] and Pat[rick McGuire], and an earthquake occurs, in which the exits are just like blocked, ceiling falls down, and you can’t get out, and there’s a radiation leak, but there are only two hazmat suits. What do you do?”After the audible laughter in the room had died down, Cappello-Lee answered the question.“That’s a very important question and very realistic,” Cappello-Lee said. “Ultimately, I would just give it to Elizabeth and Pat[rick], like that’s the type of person I am, and since they are good people, I’d probably want to save them.”There were no more questions regarding her nomination, and after she exited the room, the Senate confirmed her nomination.Following the nominations, the Senate heard from director of department of community and engagement director, senior Alex Yom, about promoting this year’s department events, including Converge.“So far this year, I’m sure you’ve all seen the South Bend adventure guide being posted,” Yom said. “So we’re trying to give more access for students of all years to understand the different restaurants and things to do in South Bend. In terms of civic engagement, we’re proud to have done the Converge kickoff, which had over 200 signups this year matching people from different political views.Yom said the department also worked with ND Votes on a voter registration competition, registering over 1,200 people across campus. Next semester, the department’s focus is will be on ensuring students have access to volunteering and internships in South Bend.“So we’ll be putting on the social concerns fair with the Center for Social Concerns …  and then the big idea actually that we’re all really excited about because the debate is going to be held on campus next year,” Yom said. “… We’re really excited to put together sort of like this debate facilitator model, building off of the success of Converge. We’re hoping [to] pair different dorms together and have debate facilitators trained in each dorm pairing, and basically have a sort of debate model up until the actual presidential debate next fall. So the Senate would be a huge help to publicize this in your respective residence halls and trying to recruit people.”Following the talk from Yom, the Senate voted to move a resolution recognizing and encouraging No Shave November to the floor. Sam Delmer, a sophomore senator from the Dillon community in Baumer Hall, was one of the patrons and presented the bill to the Senate.“The goal of No Shave November is to grow awareness by embracing our hair, which many cancer patients lose, and letting it grow wild and free,” Delmer said. “Members of the University community may participate by growing a beard, cultivating a mustache, letting those legs go natural … participation is by no means obligatory, but the recognition of the program offers important recognition of our community’s allyship with cancer patients and their families.”There were not many concerns with the resolution, but some wondered if the bill would be discriminatory against hairless people.“Delmer said the bill would not be discriminatory because shaving itself is the concern and not shaving because one does not have any hair to shave is acceptable,” he said.Following these brief concerns, the Senate motioned for the end of debate and passed the resolution.Tags: student senatelast_img read more

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Schwalbe’s New Race Tire is the ONE

first_imgWhen a tire is important enough to warrant its own factory that is dedicated to producing only that one tire, you could assume that tire is pretty special. In order to produce the One, Schwalbe set up a new factory in Indonesia and brought in their best workers as Senior Product Manager Markus Hachmeyer points out, “It is a completely new unit where only Schwalbe One tires are being produced, with fixed vulcanization and production units that are used exclusively for this tire. This is where the most skilled workers in the entire Schwalbe plant can be found.”Schwalbe claims the One is both the fastest and at the same time most reliable racing tire they have produced. Learn more after the break. To appease both professional racers and weekend warriors alike, the One will be available in clincher, tubeless, and tubular versions. All three versions of the tire will have Schwalbe’s new OneStar triple compound rubber which was developed specifically for lower rolling resistance. Schwalbe claims the new compound is only possible through the use of new polymers that have only recently been available which offered better trade offs between rolling resistance, wet grip, and durability.The One is still very light at 205g, though apples to apples it is slightly heavier than the Ultremo ZX which will still be available. The benefit to the One is that it is faster and more durable than the Ultremo ZX. Designed with a new profile and beefed up shoulder, combined with V-guard and a new tread pattern the One promises to be extremely puncture resistant.Offered in the three versions, sizing will be 23, 25, and 28mm for the clincher and tubeless tires, while the tubular will be sold in 22, 24, 26, and 28mm sizes.Designed with pro racers like Jens Voigt in mind, the One was found under teams like RadioShack Leopard Trek, AG2R and FDJ at the start of the tour.“I am very satisfied with the performance of the Schwalbe tires. I never experienced such wet adhesion, such great cornering with traditional, hand-sewn tubed tires in the past. And I’m thrilled with Schwalbe’s persistence and the way the company is putting its heart and soul into constantly improving these racing tires!” – that quote is much better if you imagine it in Jens’ voice.Pricing for the One is set at 49.90 euros ($64.19) for the folding tire, 64.90 euros ($83.51) for tubeless, and 84.90 euros ($109.25) for the tubular (US prices are an approximation).last_img read more

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GU Energy adds sales agencies across North America

first_imgGU Energy Labs, a pioneer of the original energy gel, has added new sales agencies in the New England, Northeast, Southeast and Rocky Mountain territories.According to the company, the expansion of GU’s sales force marks the significant success and increased demand for GU Energy products throughout the North American market.“We are thrilled to expand our sales team with such professional and experienced new team members,” said Colin True, National Sales Manager for GU Energy, “These pros bring a wealth of knowledge and sales expertise that will continue to harvest and strengthen our relationships with dealers and customers alike throughout North America.”“Even as we increase our sales footprint overseas and in the health and vitamin categories,” added GU’s Vice President of Sales, Christian Johnson, “We are always looking to solidify and expand our category-leading sales in our core markets.”Among the new hires, Judd Feingold and his team from Up East Sales will be covering Run/Outdoor markets in the New England territory, while George Frick and a team of reps from New England Specialty Sports will oversee the cycling market.In the Northeast, MVP Sales led by Michael Longo will be facilitating Run and Outdoor retail.Venture Sports Inc’s Al Trunstall and his team will oversee Run and Outdoor in the southeast states of Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Kentucky, Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi.Finally, in the Rocky Mountains, RJ Guiney of Mountain Source and his team will serve both the Run/Outdoor and Utah/Wyoming Cycling accounts.GU’s original Energy Gel was launched in 1994 in Berkeley, California. GU Energy Labs’ consistent innovation aims to keep GU at the forefront of the industry. GU Roctane, Chomps and Recovery Brew are staples of endurance athletes’ worldwide, ‘providing scientifically proven, performance-tested nutrition.’www.GUenergy.com Relatedlast_img read more

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After weeks of lobbying by residents, Prairie Village council bucks staff recommendation, moves pedestrian safety project near St. Ann up to 2016

first_imgKatie Siengsukon and supporters applauded after the Prairie Village City Council voted 6-5 to make the pedestrian safety project a priority for 2016.The weeks-long organized lobbying effort by a group of families who live near St. Ann Catholic School and SM East to get the city of Prairie Village to take quick action to improve pedestrian safety along Mission Road between 71st Street and 75th Street bore fruit Monday.By a 6-5 vote, the city council approved a plan to make the renovation of that stretch of road the city’s targeted County Assistance Road System (CARS) project for 2016, meaning half of the project costs will be eligible for reimbursement from Johnson County. The city’s public works department had initially slated the renovation of Mission from 75th Street to 83rd Street as the CARS project for 2016 and targeted 2017 to make the improvements to the stretch that runs from the Village Shops to SM East.But persistent pressure from a group of homeowners in the area led by 74th Street residents Katie Siengsukon and Mike Riley, who became concerned for the safety of pedestrians on the road after a near-miss accident in February where a car hopped the curb onto the sidewalk directly abutting Mission Road just before St. Ann let out school, swayed enough members of the council to vote to move the project up a year, bucking the recommendations of city staff and Mayor Laura Wassmer.At the beginning of Monday’s proceedings, Public Works Director Keith Bredehoeft told the council he was supportive of the 71st to 75th Street project and believed it could be a valuable improvement to pedestrians and cyclists. However, he said, to be properly executed, a project of such scope requires months of planning and public involvement. He also noted that it was not a typical CARS project, in that it will require significant reconfiguration of the street. (Most CARS projects are simple mill-and-overlay repairs to existing infrastructure).Bredehoeft said that while it was possible to get the project done in 2016, he worried that moving it up a year would force his team to rush the process and may not give them time to take every factor — like how best to accommodate bicycles on the road — into consideration.But Siengsukon and more than a dozen supporters who filled the council chamber galley, many with children in tow, argued that the city had allowed the unsafe conditions for pedestrians along Mission for too long and that it was imperative to make the improvements as quickly as possible.“This is a safety concern that is real, it’s urgent, and we experience it every day,” Siengsukon told the council. “This is a ‘have-to do’ situation.”Lynn Thornburg, the woman in whose yard the Jaguar in the February accident ended up, burst into tears as she approached the microphone during public comment, telling the council the thought of someone having gotten injured in the accident distressed her.“Everyone takes great pride in their house and yard [in our neighborhood]. I want my daughter to be out in the yard — but the way things are right now, we can’t do that,” she said.No one on the council suggested that the safety concerns of the residents were invalid or that the project shouldn’t be undertaken. But several noted that rushing to move the project to 2016 opened the possibility that it wouldn’t be carried out to its full potential.“I believe in this project 100 percent. My problem is rushing it,” said Ruth Hopkins, the council’s most tenured member, who noted that she sent her three children to St. Ann Catholic school. “What we’ve been told is that it’s an 18-month project to do it well and do it right…I really think you could end up with something that’s not the best.”Councilor Steve Noll echoed her concerns.“These are changes that are needed and they’re overdue,” he said. “But we don’t have enough time to get this done — to study, vet it and analyze — if we move it up a year. You can’t just hire a temp and say ‘do it.’ That just is not the way we should be doing it.”But other councilors cited the concerted effort of the residents to effect a positive change as the key driver in their decision.“Rarely, if ever in my time on the council have I seen so many people come together to support a positive change in their neighborhood,” said councilor Andrew Wang. “They weren’t coming together to fight against something. They wanted something positive.”Eric Mikkelson, perhaps the effort’s strongest proponent on the council, said time and again that of all the competing interests surrounding the decision, the “safety of our children and residents should be the top consideration.”Mikkelson, Wang, Jori Nelson, Dan Runion, David Morrison and Terrence Gallagher voted in favor of making the 71st to 75th Street project the priority for 2016. Hopkins, Noll, Ashley Weaver, Sheila Myers and Brooke Morehead voted against it. Councilor Ted Odell was absent.Current estimates for the project are approximately $1,000,000, of which $500,000 should be eligible for CARS reimbursement. The 75th Street to 83rd Street project that had been planned for 2016 and is now slated for 2017 was budgeted at an estimated $1,776,000, half of which would have been eligible for CARS reimbursement.Bredehoeft told the council that construction on the project likely would not begin until after school has let out for summer in 2016 in an effort to lessen inconvenience.last_img read more

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Indian Woods seventh grader Aleks Hoffmann collects food, hygiene items for Avenue of Life

first_imgIndian Woods seventh grader Aleks Hoffmann is collecting food, hygiene items and household goods for Avenue of Life during the COVID-19 shutdown.So far, he’s collected dozens of items through donations from neighbors, his church, and Shawnee Mission schools to help the Kansas City, Kansas organization serve families who could use a boost.“Right now, I have no problem with being at home all the time, other than I don’t get to hang out with friends a lot,” he said. “But these people that need stuff are in their houses, and they don’t have items that they need, like toilet paper or food or toothpaste..”As a past volunteer for Avenue of Life with his church, Jacob’s Well, Hoffmann connected with the organization to discuss working on an Eagle Scout project. But after that project was tabled, due to stay-at-home orders, staff sent him a list of needed items, which he’s been collecting since March 27.“I can’t tell you how proud I am. He’s done a good job of articulating it, as a 13-year-old, to a lot of different groups,” said Dana Hoffmann, his mother.The collector bin at the end of the driveway at his Leawood home gets a steady trickle of items throughout the week. Most donations come from Indian Woods, his former school Brookwood Elementary, and Jacob’s Well. But neighbors are pitching in as well.“I feel pretty good about the support that I’m getting,” he said. “It makes me feel more connected to my communities.”His inventory includes nearly 100 items, especially canned goods and packs of family meals.“It’s small, but people are starting to drop off more and more,” said Dana Hoffmann.Hoffmann plans to keep collecting items until the state and Johnson County lift stay-at-home orders. You can check out Avenue of Life’s list of needed items here.last_img read more

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Credit union’s final public forum on RBC is today: Next steps for NCUA and CUNA

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr As the National Credit Union Administration launches its final credit union Listening Session today, it is to a back drop of assurances that the agency’s risk-based capital proposal will undergo changes in key areas before it is made final.The NCUA confirmed to  News Now  that when today’s session in Alexandria, Va., ends around 4 p.m. (ET), the agency’s process going forward will be continued review of the proposed rule–particularly in the area of risk weights–and of the comments that have been made.  Further, the agency said it will take “the time necessary” for a thorough review.As NCUA Chair Debbie Matz said in the earlier Listening Sessions held in Los Angeles and Chicago and as confirmed Wednesday, credit unions can anticipate changes in the proposed risk weights, especially in the areas of mortgages, member business loans, investments, credit union service organizations, and corporates credit unions. Also, the agency spokesman said the implementation period for the rule will be extended beyond the 18-months currently proposed.“Any final rule will be clear on the point that the NCUA board, not individual credit union examiners, will make determinations about whether a specific credit union needs to hold more capital,” the spokesman added. continue reading »last_img read more

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Elliot Business Park In Tempe Getting 316,000 SF Industrial Warehouse

first_imgElliot Business Park has launched the final phase of its 1 MSF project, bringing 316,000 SF of investment-grade warehouse distribution space to market by the end of the year.The two new buildings, which broke ground in the second quarter, are the first speculative industrial projects in the Southeast Valley since first quarter 2008.Jerry McCormick, John Werstler and Cooper Fratt of CBRE’s Phoenix office will handle the leasing assignment for the project’s owner, Phoenix-based Tempe Marketplace Commerce Associates LLP and its affiliate, Transpacific Development Southwest, which developed the industrial park in phases, beginning with the first building in 1999.The owner’s philosophy is to develop quality buildings for long-term investment that attract quality tenants, and maintain those relationships.The leasing team has already filled one of the new buildings prior to completion, pre-leasing it to Clear Energy Systems. The other 158,000 SF building under construction is the only space available at Elliot Business Park, and all the existing space is 100% occupied.“While demand is high, supply is not,” McCormick said. “The vacancy rate for distribution product in the Southeast Valley is below 8%, leaving only Elliot Business Park and two other options for users needing 100,000 square feet or more in the Southeast Valley. Clearly more product is needed to accommodate growth of the area’s high-tech industry, which will bring more jobs to the area.”In addition to the 316,000 SF of warehouse/distribution space under construction at Elliot Business Park, another 500,000 SF is planned by others in the Southeast Valley. Yet, according to CBRE Research, roughly 1 MSF of warehouse/distribution space has been absorbed in the same area since the start of the year.Elliot Business Park caters to high-quality and high-end users that desire Class A, energy efficient warehouse space designed for long-term durability and lower maintenance costs. Notable building features include a steel roof structure, ESFR fire sprinkler system, 30-foot clear height, Portland cement concrete paved truck courts, ample parking and up to 3,600 amp 277/480 volt electric service provided by Salt River Project — the lowest cost electric provider in the Valley.The buildings’ energy efficient features include insulated windows, insulated roll-up doors, R-30 roof insulation, an Energy Star rated single-ply roof membrane and skylights.Completion of the two new buildings is anticipated by 4Q 2012. Euthenics Architecture of Phoenix is the architect and DL Withers Constructions of Phoenix is the contractor.last_img read more

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8-building Phoenix office park sells for $7.5M

first_imgCushman & Wakefield negotiated the $7.5 million sale of Arcadia Corporate Park, located at the northeast corner of McDowell Road and 48th Street.The Phoenix property was sold to California-based WLA Investment.Arcadia Corporate Park is an eight-building, multi-tenant industrial complex totaling 109,143 square feet. Built in 1981, the property features grade-level loading doors servicing each suite and 14 feet to 16 feet clear height in warehouse areas.Senior Managing Directors Bob Buckley, Tracy Cartledge and Steve Lindley and Associate Ben Geelan with Cushman & Wakefield represented the seller in the transaction, Phoenix-based Presson Companies.“In Arcadia Corporate Park, WLA saw an opportunity to acquire a quality, well maintained multi-tenant industrial complex located in an infill location with virtually no sites available to build competitive new product,” said Buckley.Encompassing 9.13-acres, Arcadia Corporate Park has excellent frontage on McDowell Road, one of the major east/west traffic corridors connecting Phoenix, Scottsdale and Tempe. “The exceptional curb appeal, with high-visibility creates strong location awareness to draw potential tenants and customers,” added Buckley.last_img read more

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Is cursing really such a big deal any more?

first_imgThe Globe and Mail: Recently, on the sitcom Modern Family, a subplot concerned little Lily letting loose the mother of swear words to the consternation of one of her dads, and the giggles of the other. The child actress playing the kid said “fudge,” which was bleeped, but this didn’t stop something called the No Cussing Club (not known for its rockin’ parties) from requesting that ABC kill the episode. The Parents Television Council joined in lock step, and a spokesperson complained: “The more we see and hear this kind of language on television, the more acceptable and common it will become in the real world.”Who blames television for anything any more? There’s a sweet retro quality to the huffing, like wringing one’s hands over the declining quality of radio serials. It’s also unclear who’s chicken and who’s egg in this scenario – the “real world” is what television often purports to reflect.Read the whole story: The Globe and Maillast_img read more

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Why Trying to Be Less Awkward Never Works

first_imgYou know that thing where someone is walking toward you, and you move one way but so do they, then you move the other way but so do they, and you repeat this dance until, inevitably, one of you says, “Shall we dance?”Awkward moments like these can be panic-inducing, and judging by the number of books and articles and videos on awkwardness that have popped up in recent years, this is far from a unique worry. So many of these try to help by offering outrageously specific advice. Don’t let a conversational silence last longer than four seconds. Memorize this easy formula for politely ending a conversation: “Content Summary Statement, Justification, Positive Affect Statement, Continuity, and Well-Wishing.” Tilt your head and point your feet toward people you’re talking to, in order to show them that you’re interested in what they’re saying. Read the whole story: The New York Times More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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