Report highlights non-federal efforts to cut antibiotics in food

first_imgWith federal efforts to reduce the amount of antibiotics used to raise the nation’s livestock and poultry lagging, state legislatures, city governments, and institutional food purchasers across the country are picking up the slack, a report today from the Consumer Federation of America (CFA) suggests.Among the highlighted efforts are laws passed in California and Maryland that prohibit food producers from regularly using medically important antibiotics for disease prevention in their herds and flocks. These laws, set to take effect in 2018, go a step beyond the efforts of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which has implemented reforms to end the use of medically important antibiotics for growth promotion in food-producing animals but still allows for their use in disease prevention.While state laws might represent the best path for large-scale reform of antibiotic use in food-producing animals, municipal governments, school districts, universities, and hospitals are making their voices heard by adopting policies that require the purchase of meat raised with fewer or no antibiotics. These lower-profile actions, the authors of the report say, are important efforts in the fight to preserve the efficacy of antibiotics.”Given the inadequacies in existing federal policy, and no sign that major reforms are forthcoming, state and local actions to reduce animal antibiotic use is critical,” the authors write. “Fortunately, advocates across the country are finding ways around the federal government to influence how antibiotics are used in livestock production.”Stricter state lawsAccording to the most recent estimates, somewhere between 70% and 80% of medically important antibiotics sold in the United States are for use in food-producing animals. Because of the links between the overuse of antibiotics in animal agriculture and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in both veterinary and human health, most public health and infectious disease experts agree that efforts to slow the spread of antibiotic resistance must include policies to reduce this amount.But the FDA has been “slow to act,” the report argues, and its most recent reform efforts to promote judicious use of antibiotics by livestock and poultry producers, while a step in the right direction, may be too modest to significantly reduce antibiotic use on US farms. In particular, the report criticizes the FDA’s current policy—spelled out in Guidance #209 and Guidance #213—for reliance on voluntary compliance from farmers and pharmaceutical companies and for allowing the routine use of medically important antibiotics for disease prevention.The laws passed in California and Maryland take a narrower position on judicious use. California’s SB 27 allows for use of medically important antibiotics in disease prevention, but only in extraordinary circumstances. Maryland’s Senate Bill 422 contains similar language.In addition, California’s law calls for the California Department of Food and Agriculture to collect data on the sales and uses of medically important antibiotics from the state’s livestock producers. Other laws regarding the use of antibiotics in animal agriculture are being considered in Oregon, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and New York.This type of state legislation “may represent the most promising means of tackling antibiotic resistance in the absence of effective federal action,” the authors write.  Among the municipal efforts highlighted in the report is San Francisco’s Ordinance 170763, a measure that requires the city’s large grocery stores to submit reports to city officials on the use of antibiotics in the meat and poultry they sell. The reports will include the average number of days of antibiotic use per animal, the percentage of animals treated with antibiotics, and the different purposes for which antibiotics are used, and are to be posted on the city’s website for public view. The ordinance, which has been criticized by the grocery and meat processing industries, was passed by the city’s Board of Supervisors on Oct 3.Influencing practices through procurementAnother effective, and perhaps less controversial, tool for encouraging food producers to use antibiotics less frequently is procurement—the process through which institutions find and acquire goods and services. As the CFA report explains, institutions such as city departments, school districts, universities, and hospitals in recent years have enacted procurement policies that favor buying meat and poultry raised without antibiotics or with minimal use of antibiotics.”By purchasing from producers who do not use antibiotics, or are certified as using them responsibly, cities, schools, hospitals and other public institutions are influencing industry to shift production practices in a way that ensures antibiotics are used less frequently,” the authors write.One of the most high-profile procurement programs is the Good Food Purchasing Program, which was adopted by the City of Los Angeles in 2012 and has since been adopted by other cities. Under this policy, which bases food purchasing decisions on five core values (developing local economies, maintaining nutrition, supporting a valued workforce, promoting environmental sustainability, and protecting animal health), city departments are encouraged to buy meat and poultry raised without antibiotics.Schools across the country, meanwhile, are doing their part with the help of organizations like School Food FOCUS and the Urban School Food Alliance, which connect school districts with food producers, processors, manufacturers, and distributors. These organizations help leverage the purchasing power of schools to create a demand for meat and poultry raised on fewer antibiotics.One of the by-products of this effort, created by School Food FOCUS and the Pew Charitable Trusts in 2015, is the Certified Responsible Antibiotic Use (CRAU) standard, which ensures that chicken purchased by schools and other institutions has been raised with minimal use of antibiotics (only after the animals have been diagnosed as having, or exposed to, a bacterial infection). The US Department of Agriculture verifies compliance with the standard through audits of suppliers.Among the universities that have adopted a “no antibiotics ever” policy in the meat they buy and serve are Yale University, the University of Massachusetts, and the University of Washington.Medical facilities are also banding together to increase their ability to influence the production of meat and poultry with fewer antibiotics. This effort has been aided by the organizations Healthcare Without Harm and Practice Greenhealth, which are encouraging participating hospitals to buy less meat overall and increase the purchase of meat raised without routine antibiotics by 5% each year. According to the CFA report, more than 1,000 hospitals nationwide have committed to this effort.Thomas Gremillion, co-author of the report and director of CFA’s Food Policy Institute, said that these efforts are important because the nature of the problem requires action at all levels. But ultimately, he says, stronger policies at the federal level will be needed.”Even with the progress being made at the state and local level, a stronger federal role is critical because antibiotic resistance is already killing tens of thousands of people in the United States each year,” he told CIDRAP News.See also:Oct 5 CFA report “Going Local: Initiatives to Reduce Antibiotics in the Food Supply”Oct 3 San Francisco Examiner story on local ordinancelast_img read more

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Calls to action from hydrogen stakeholders

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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GSP nets drilling contract in Tunisia

first_imgRomanian provider of offshore integrated services for oil and gas industry, Grup Servicii Petroliere (GSP), has been awarded an offshore drilling contract in Tunisia. The contract was awarded by Numhyd, a jointly owned and managed oil company, founded by the Tunisian Company of Petroleum Activities (ETAP) and The Algerian National Oil Company (SONATRACH), who each own 50%.GSP said that drilling operations will be carried out with the GSP Jupiter, a cantilever type mobile offshore drilling unit (MODU).The company noted that the rig is currently under preparation for the contract in Limassol, Cyprus. GSP Jupiter is expected to be promptly moved onto location and drill one firm well and one optional well, the company added.This is the second offshore drilling campaign GSP provides for Numhyd offshore Tunisia, after the exploration drilling operations GSP Saturn performed in 2011 and 2012.last_img read more

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Christmas deadlines: A guide to dealing with disputes

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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Felbermayr and Terex keep production going

first_imgOne challenge was the project’s requirement that the lifts and crane set up did not interrupt production at the gigantic milk processing plant. This required a plan that had to be followed meticulously in order to successfully replace the tanks in the required timeframe.The jobsite conditions made things even more difficult with there being very little space in which to manoeuver the crane. Additionally, the ground where the crane had to be set up was on a steep slope.”In order to compensate for the downhill slope, we supported the AC 1000 by retracting the rear right outrigger almost completely and extending the front left outrigger almost fully, which allowed us to deal with the challenging jobsite,” explains Terex service technician Hartwig Bock, who provided support for the project.The Felbermayr team worked on the four Fridays between August 3 and August 24, 2012 allowing production at Sachsenmilch to go undisturbed.www.felbermayr.ccwww.terex.comlast_img read more

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UN urges Ghana to strengthen resilience against humanitarian crisis amid COVID-19

first_imgCOVID-19 is worst crisis since World War II: UN A health worker checks the temperature of a traveller as part of the coronavirus screening procedure at the Kotoka International Airport in Accra, Ghana. (Image Source: Reuters)The United Nations (UN) has urged the government of Ghana to make proper use of the country’s resilience system amid the ongoing spread of the new coronavirus to avert any humanitarian crisis.It said in a release on Wednesday the government should remain vigilant and stay ahead of situations that would require humanitarian interventions.The UN said on the World Humanitarian Day on Wednesday that humanitarian relief work is essential in aiding the vulnerable people in a timely and efficient manner, and ultimately ensuring that no one lags behind in the COVID-19 response and recovery plans.“Other tragedies triggered by the pandemic such as poverty, loss of a job, gender-based violence, malnutrition, and unwanted pregnancies, are imminent. We must act now to mitigate tragedies that are beyond the health implications of the COVID-19 virus.” said the UN Resident Coordinator Charles Abani.The statement lauded the frontline workers for making sure that “Ghanaians, and especially the most vulnerable, including the aged, women, young people, children, migrants, refugees and people with disability receive needed services.”As of Wednesday morning, Ghana has seen a total of 42,993 confirmed COVID-19 cases with 248 deaths.Related Ghana’s COVID-19 cases pass 19,000center_img Ghana announces 470 new COVID-19 infectionslast_img read more

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Port of Rotterdam Calls for Higher CO2 Tax

first_imgCastelein hopes that a significantly higher CO2 price will stimulate new investments in clean technologies and innovation. “A price in the range of 50-70 euros per ton of CO2 will stimulate companies to invest in solutions that we really need in order to realise the targets of the Paris Climate Agreement.”In this respect, he warns against an uneven playing field. “I don’t support a solo approach, such as that of the UK with electricity production. As a transit country, the Netherlands is closely linked to the countries that surround it. A North-West European coalition would guarantee a level playing field for the industry.”Besides the benefits of such a coalition, the Port Authority also stresses the importance of a new industrial policy. “The Government is currently focusing on the reduction of greenhouse gases. In order to switch to a new energy system, as a Government you also need an integral vision and a corresponding industrial policy for the new economy, the future industrial landscape and the type of R&D required to achieve that. I also think that this is an important task for the Government. So: international pricing, national stimulation.The Rotterdam/Moerdijk port industrial area faces the challenge of reducing CO2 by 20 million tons per year as of 2030 (–49% compared to 1990). The Port Authority is convinced that this target can be realised as part of the national Climate Agreement.“We started in plenty of time in this region,” said Castelein, who is also Chairman of the so-called climate table for Rotterdam/Moerdijk. “We now have more than 40 projects in our portfolio that support the energy transition. Without exception, they involve coalitions of companies that are committed to tackling climate change and ensuring that Rotterdam continues to be a vital world-class port.”The target for 2050 is more ambitious. The Port Authority believes that radical changes are required in order to achieve this target. “Whereas we’re now mainly looking at end-of-pipe solutions for the optimisation of the existing energy system, towards 2050 we will really need a radical change of the system”.PrevNext1. New research figuresThe Port Authority also presented new research figures at the Energy in Transition Summit 2018. Whereas last year the Port Authority commissioned the Wuppertal Institute to research the options for making industry in the port area sustainable, this year the Institute looked at the transport and logistics sector. The study shows that marine and inland transport with Rotterdam as the destination or departure point is responsible for emissions of around 25 million tons of CO2 every year.The majority of this amount (21.5 million tons) can be attributed to marine transport. To ensure that this sector also complies with the Paris Climate Agreement, emissions will have to be reduced by 95% by 2050. The first half of this target (up to 50%) can be achieved by efficiency measures, but the remainder will require the deployment of different fuels.According to the Wuppertal Institute, in the coming decades LNG and biofuels can help shape the transition, but the ultimate goal can only be achieved with electrification and hydrogen and the use of synthetic fuels such as methanol.The Port of Rotterdam Authority wants to help decarbonise the logistical chains of which it is also a part. In that context, Castelein was delighted to announce that the Port Authority is introducing an incentive of in total 5 million euros for climate-friendly maritime shipping. The arrangement will be used to support vessel owners and charterers that experiment with low-carbon or zero-carbon fuels that are supplied in Rotterdam.The Port Authority also announced the introduction of a 100% discount for inland port charges when vessel owners comply with Green Award’s platinum certificate (sailing on electricity or on fuel cells for at least 50% of the time or for 3 hours per day) and make use of NextLogic, as soon as this is operational. NextLogic is a planning tool that optimises handling of container inland shipping in the port of Rotterdam.Sea News, April 13 Author: Priyanka Ann Saini The Port of Rotterdam Authority is calling on the Dutch Government to form a coalition with countries in North-West Europe so that a joint CO2 price can be introduced. At the Port Authority’s Energy in Transition Summit 2018 on the RDM site in Rotterdam, Port Authority CEO Allard Castelein made a powerful case for a much higher CO2 price in conjunction with a new industrial policy for the Netherlands. At the summit, the Port Authority also revealed the results of the CO2 impact of marine and inland shipping. The Port Authority announced that it would introduce an incentive of in total 5 million euros to support vessel owners and charterers that experiment with low-carbon or zero-carbon fuels to promote climate-friendly maritime shipping.last_img read more

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Former broadcaster appointed Press Secretary

first_imgLocalNews Former broadcaster appointed Press Secretary by: Dominica Vibes News – March 17, 2016 Share Mrs. Kamala JnoBaptiste-Aaron as Press Secretary.The Dominica government has confirmed the appointment od Kamala JnoBaptiste-Aaron as Press Secretary.JnoBaptiste-Aaron is well known in media circles in Dominica and brings a wealth of experience to the position.After starting her career as a Journalist at the National Radio Station – DBS Radio 18 years ago in 1998, she held various leadership positions in media; among them News Director at Observer Media in Antigua and Barbuda in 2006.As Press Secretary in the Office of the Prime Minister, JnoBaptiste-Aaron will perform several duties under the direct supervision of the Secretary to the Cabinet, including; working with the Cabinet on matters related to the media; acting as Spokesperson for the Government in relation to the media; liaising with the media both locally and overseas; and assisting with development and administration of Communications and Media strategy for the Office of the Prime Minister.JnoBaptiste-Aaron formally took up her duties on Tuesday March, 15, 2016.JnoBaptiste formerly hosted a radio program on Kairi FM and assumed the role after Daryl Titre, who was press attache, was reassigned to the Ministry of Tourism and Urban Renewal. The previous press attache was Sean Douglas. 717 Views   no discussions Tweetcenter_img Share Share Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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Barcelona vs Real Madrid: Zidane speaks on Ronaldo’s red card

first_imgReal Madrid manager, Zinedine Zidane, was left fuming by Cristiano Ronaldo’s dismissal in their Spanish Super Cup victory at Barcelona.Zidane is adamant the red card was harsh on his star player.Ronaldo produced a memorable cameo, as Madrid defeated arch-rivals Barca 3-1 in the first leg of the Supercopa on Sunday.He came off the bench to make it 2-1 and was booked for taking off his shirt in celebration. Ronaldo was then shown a second yellow for diving.“As always, I’m not going to get involved in discussing the work of the referee,” Zidane told reporters.“We played a great game, but what annoyed me was Cristiano Ronaldo’s dismissal. Maybe there’s no penalty, but to show a card [for alleged diving] was a little harsh.“However, we cannot change that, even if we’ll try to have him available for Wednesday.”last_img read more

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