The trouble with drinking guidelines: What, in the world, is a standard drink?

first_imgPinterest LinkedIn It’s a widely accepted fact that excessive drinking of alcohol is bad for one’s health. But what constitutes excessive drinking? According to a new report published today by the scientific journal Addiction, the answer to that question varies widely by country, and many countries don’t provide an answer.Researchers looked at 75 countries that might be expected to provide low-risk drinking guidelines and a definition of a ‘standard drink’. Only 37 countries (under 50%) did so, and their guidelines and ‘standard drink’ definitions were surprisingly inconsistent.The size of a standard drink varies by 250%, from a low of 8 g in Iceland and the United Kingdom to a high of 20 g in Austria. An 8 g drink is equivalent to 250 ml (8.45 US fluid ounces) of 4% beer, 76 ml (2.57 oz) of 13% wine, or 25 ml (0.85 oz) of 40% spirits. In the most conservative countries, low-risk consumption means drinking no more than 10 g of pure ethanol per day for women, 20 g for men.Want to drink more? In Chile, you can drink 56 g per day and still be a low-risk drinker.Got a reason to celebrate? In Australia, Canada, Denmark, Fiji, France, Mexico, New Zealand, Poland, and the UK, you are allowed to drink more on special occasions.Tired of the old double standard? In Australia, Grenada, Portugal, and South Africa, low-risk drinking guidelines are the same for women and men. The UK joins that list with its new guidelines.Co-author of the report Keith Humphreys says, “If you think your country should have a different definition of a standard drink or low-risk drinking, take heart – there’s probably another country that agrees with you.”The World Health Organization defines a standard drink as 10 g of pure ethanol, with both men and women advised not to exceed 2 standard drinks per day. Although the WHO’s definition of a standard drink is the one most often used, 50% of countries with drinking guidelines don’t use it. Emailcenter_img Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Sharelast_img read more

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Ken-Tool Appoints New Director of Marketing and Sales

first_imgAKRON, OHIO — Automotive specialty tool manufacturer Ken-Tool has appointed Gerald Hill to the position of director of marketing and sales. Hill is a seasoned sales and marketing executive, having spent more than 20 years with the Timken Co. in various sales and marketing positions. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Hill began his career as a sales representative for Timken in San Francisco. He then served as a district manager in both Minneapolis and Los Angeles, later being promoted to national sales manager, aftermarket distribution-bearings. Hill also held the positions of national sales manager for heavy duty products and national account manager for the company. “We’re very pleased to have been able to find a person with Jerry’s skill sets and experience. I’m excited about the new ideas and programs Jerry will bring to our company,” said Alec Pendleton, president of Ken-Tool. “We are committed to growing the company with new and exciting marketing programs as well as with new products. Jerry brings us experience and fresh thinking in these most important areas.” _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business. last_img read more

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County On Tips For Zero Waste School Supplies

first_imgCOUNTY News: Here is a look at school supplies, the waste they generate and explores some sustainable alternatives. Zippers are less likely to break, seams are less likely to rip and straps are less likely to fray. If your kid outgrows it, you can pass it down to siblings or friends. When planning for lunches, use reusable alternatives to plastic utensils and baggies. Give your kids actual metal utensils (you can buy cheap ones at the thrift store if you are worried about them getting lost or tossed), a cloth napkin and food packaged in reusable containers. It’s easy to get caught up in the frenzy, supply list in hand, especially on tax-free weekend. It is time for back-to-school shopping: backpacks, scissors, filler paper, and pencils by the ton, not to mention new clothes. When back-to-school shopping, always start in your own house. Salvage from previous school years, raid your home office supplies or trade with your friends. Next, look to thrift stores and other second-hand sources. If you have to buy new, look for recycled or sustainably-sourced content. Impress upon your kids the importance of taking care of their supplies so they may last all year and beyond. And if you have extra supplies, consider donating them to the schools. Buy in bulk rather than in small, single-serving packages and convenience foods, then pack the food into your own containers, or juice or milk into a Thermos. Wrap loose items in beeswax wraps instead of plastic. Purchase reusable water bottles. All schools are equipped with water bottle filling stations thanks to a NMED Recycling and Illegal Dumping (RAID) Grant. These actions save resources and it’s cheaper that way too! When it comes to school supplies, there is often no wiggle room. They want their 24 Ticonderoga pencils, 12 glue sticks, 4 dry erase markers, plastic baggies, Clorox wipes and very specific folders. It can be hard to cut waste in this area, but here are a few suggestions: Most kids use a backpack and lunchbox for school. When you go to a store, they have all the kids’ favorite characters on them, and the kids want something new and different. Backpacks and lunchboxes are two items that should be able to last more than one year. There are two ways to achieve longevity here: first, buy quality, and second, set the expectation that these items are to be cared for, not tossed on the ground or sat upon. At school, there are cubbies, hooks, or lockers to keep them safe; there should be a special place at home as well, and not on the floor in the corner where the cat could pee in it (one author learned that the hard way). When you buy quality items, you pay more up front for the longer lifespan. Need a highlighter? Try a highlighter pencil: there’s no plastic, and it never dries out.Use folders and spiral notebooks from previous years. Notebooks are almost never filled, and sturdy folders can be reused, even if you have to cover the front. Take blank pages from used 3-hole punched notebooks to use as filler paper.Shop the thrift stores. They usually have tons of decent three-ring binders and other supplies.For paper products, choose recycled paper. Post-consumer content is best, but any recycled content is better than none.You can even find erasers made from recycled plastic, and pencils and colored pencils made from recycled newspaper instead of wood! A sixth grader will need a bigger pack than a first grader, and a lunchbox just big enough for a fourth grader will not hold enough food for a growing teen, but there’s no reason that a first-grade backpack can’t last through second or even third grade, or a larger pack through all of high school.last_img read more

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Official figures show construction output dropping in second quarter

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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Goldhofer supports Sarens in Kazakhstan

first_imgThe order included 68 axle lines of the THP/SL heavy-duty modules and 24 PST/SL axle lines. After placing the order in mid-May 2018, the axle lines were delivered within three months.According to Goldhofer, Sarens is using the additional axle lines for the Tengizchevroil TCO project in Kazakhstan, where the heavy lift and engineered transport provider is responsible for the complete site logistics for the planned construction period up to 2020.Carl Sarens, director global operations, explained: “We have dispatched around 250 specialists to handle the overland transportation and on-site installation of the pre-assembled units and racks as well as associated oversize equipment.“For the overland transportation operations, Sarens already had more than 900 axle lines available in Kazakhstan. At the beginning of 2018, however, we saw an upcoming peak in the required logistical capacities.“We therefore had to urgently increase our capacities to avoid problems in meeting the project schedule. Goldhofer delivered a convincing response with top quality at very short notice and absolutely punctual shipments.“Sarens’ fleet now includes more than 300 axle lines from Goldhofer.www.sarens.comwww.goldhofer.comlast_img read more

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Heavy-duty transport emissions set to decline

first_imgThe report, Mission Possible: Reaching net-zero carbon emissions from harder-to-abate sectors by mid-century, outlines the possible routes to fully decarbonise cement, steel, plastics, trucking, shipping and aviation. Together these industries represent 30 percent of energy emissions today and could increase to 60 percent by mid-century as other sectors lower their emissions, said ETC.The report was developed with contributions from over 200 industry experts over a six-month consultation process. Its findings show that full decarbonisation is technically feasible with technologies that already exist, although several still need further investment to reach commercial readiness.In heavy-duty transport, electric trucks and buses (powered by either battery or hydrogen fuel cells) are likely to become cost-competitive by 2030, said the report.The report added that, in shipping and aviation, liquid fuels are likely to remain the preferred option for long distances but carbon emissions can be reduced by using bio or synthetic fuels.Improved energy efficiency, greater logistics efficiency and some level of modal shift for both freight and passenger transport could also reduce the size of the transition challenge.The report outlined key policies to accelerate the decarbonisation of these sectors, including tightening carbon intensity mandates on industrial processes and heavy-duty transport; accelerating public-private collaboration to build the necessary energy and transport infrastructure; and investing in the green industry through research and development.www.energy-transitions.orglast_img read more

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Dublin seeks battery-electric DART fleet

first_imgIRELAND: National railway Iarnród Éireann and the National Transport Authority have invited expressions of interest in a 10-year framework agreement covering the supply of between 250 and 600 vehicles for Dublin Area Rapid Transport suburban rail services.Expansion of DART electric services to Maynooth, Drogheda and Hazelhatch forms part of the NTA’s Project Ireland 2040 programme and its 2016-35 transport strategy for the greater Dublin area.Ireland’s 1 600 mm gauge network will require custom vehicles, and so a framework contract is planned to avoid the need to go back to the market to place future orders and go through new approvals procedures. A mix of four-car and eight-car units is envisaged, with the fleet to be maintained at a new depot on the Maynooth line.NTA has already stipulated that any future IÉ trains should be electric, electric-battery, electro-diesel or diesel-battery hybrids. The planned electrification of the three commuter routes would increase the proportion of passenger-journeys made on electric trains from 42% to 75%. Following an assessment of options, IÉ has decided to extend the 1·5 kV DC electrification used by existing DART services. It would use 25 kV 50 Hz for any future main line electrification projects outside the Dublin commuter region with long-distance trains switching systems at the approach to the capital. This decision follows studies which concluded that retaining 1·5 kV DC offers simplicity and the ability to continue to use the existing DART EMU fleet. Potential rolling stock suppliers also indicated it would easier to charge onboard batteries from DC overhead.As electrification is not envisaged before 2025, the initial order would include EMUs equipped with batteries for through working onto unwired routes. These could be converted to overhead-only operation in the future. The initial order is expected to be for 52 battery-equipped vehicles, while the remaining trains are likely to be electric only.The new stock is required to offer comparable performance to conventional EMUs, with a maximum speed of 140 km/h, a battery life of between 10 and 12 years, a range of 50 km and a charging time of between 10 and 12 min using overhead charging points at the termini.Expressions of interest are to be submitted by September 2. It is envisaged that five suppliers would be shortlisted to submit detailed proposals, with the contract worth an estimated €2bn to be awarded in Q3 2020. The contract would also include a Technical Services and Spares Supply Agreement running for up to 15 years from the delivery of the final vehicles.last_img read more

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Afghans visit high speed rail training centre

first_imgThe Afghanistan Railway Authority said the engineers had acquired a wealth of technical skills during the visit, which they would pass on to other Afghan staff to help support the country’s railway plans.AfRA staff have previously visited countries including Iran and Tajikistan for technical training, as part of the authority’s work to develop domestic railway capabilities. AFGHANISTAN: Staff from the Ministry of Transport recently travelled to China to be trained in railway management, signalling and operations. This included a visit to a high speed rail training centre.#*#*Show Fullscreen*#*# #*#*Show Fullscreen*#*#last_img

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Interview: American Young talk songwriting, UK tour and new EP

first_imgAmerican Young – made up of Kristy Osmusson and Jon Stone – have rapidly become one of the most beloved live bands on the UK country scene.Since releasing their debut album, AY, back in 2016, they’ve become a fixture at festivals such as Buckle & Boots and Country to Country. Now they’re back with their latest EP, Soundtrack Of Your Life, ahead of a short tour taking in London, Manchester and Millport Festival in Scotland.I recently caught up with Kristy and Jon to talk about the EP and tour, their approach to songwriting and what it is that keeps them coming back here.Last time we spoke was just over a year ago – what have been your highlights since then?Jon: Well, touring. We toured quite a bit and we have headlined a few things that have been pretty cool. We recorded new music in the last 12 months. Stuff like that, I guess.You’re coming back to the UK for a few dates this week. For people who haven’t seen you before, what can they expect from those shows?Jon: Well, we’ve got a UK band that we’re playing with now over there. We’re gonna share some new music that we’ve been recording. We have a new show entirely. I’m gonna bring a different guitar [laughs].Is that something that’s important to you in terms of keeping the live show fresh – both for the audience and yourselves?Jon: Yeah, absolutely.Kristy: I think it’s what’s kept us playing music for as long as we have. It’s important to constantly rework the existing material we put out, but then also incorporating this new stuff that we just put out. It has to be fresh and it has to be interesting. We have to enjoy it first, and it always comes with keeping us on our toes.<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>You’ve just released your latest EP. Can you tell us a bit more about that?Kristy: Well the latest song is called Soundtrack Of Your Life. We were just talking about what the purpose of music in our lives [is], and I just had a baby and it’s been really powerful to experience the why of what we’re doing. It brings a whole new depth and level to what we’re saying for me. I think it’s really important for me. And we’re excited to share it with everybody.Why did you choose that as the title track of the EP?Kristy: Well it came from wanting your songs to be part of that soundtrack of your life. You know, it’s interesting – so I was going through labour and I made a push playlist, and all of a sudden I started realising the true power of music and how it can bring back situations. There’s ups and downs in life and I think that is kind of what music does. It is a collection of songs from our first prom to the first song that we hear when we first get in the car, and your first kiss and all these different experiences that really do make up the soundtrack of your life. And I think there’s a gift and a responsibility in that.One thing which stood out to me about your new songs was the range of different sounds and styles they cover. Was that something you wanted to do before you started the process of making this EP?Jon: Well I think it was a conscious decision. We don’t wanna make music that sounds the same. Every song is an opportunity. Every time we write, every time we record it’s an opportunity to create something unique and empowering and identifiable to us. So I think that that’s all conscious.Were there any songs that were particularly easy or particularly difficult to write for this project?Jon: I mean we really don’t think about it like that. None of the songs were very difficult. It just takes time and attention to what the song needs or what the song’s calling for, and whether this is the moment to say the right thing or if we should record it differently.You’ve already been over to the UK this year for Buckle & Boots Festival – how did you find that?Kristy: It’s amazing – always such a cool time. And we’ve played it enough now where we know so many people. I saw from stage this couple meet a year or two ago at the first festival, and I saw their eyes meet from the stage, and I felt these crazy sparks fly and I was like, ‘oh man, that could be something!’ And then they got married and they got pregnant, and I brought my stethoscope and I got to hear the heartbeat of the baby for the first time at the festival. It was so amazing. We had our first little festival baby. They met during the song, and it was such a special and powerful moment. He’s been delivered and he is adorable, and I’m so excited we’re gonna get to meet him when we get over there.But it’s fun to be a part of everybody’s lives. And I have kids over there that we’ve become friends with, and we get to watch them grow up and watch them go through school and live vicariously in their learning of different instruments that they’re taking lessons and learning. And we get to see couples that we’ve known for a long time and watch them participate in their lives and celebrate the highs and lows. Because festivals are a time when everyone connects and just relaxes and enjoys themselves. A festival is your chance to step out of your everyday grind. And Buckle and Boots is so great like that because it’s out in the country, it’s beautiful, and you get to hit a restart on life. So we’ve just made some great relationships over there and it’s really fun to be able to see everybody. We love how they’ve responded to the new music so that’s exciting. We made the second ballot of the BCMAs so that’s really, really exciting. We found that out yesterday. But that’s fun and we’ve made such great friends over there. You guys definitely have quality people.Has there been anything surprising about people’s reactions to the new music? Have they responded to certain songs in a way you didn’t expect?Kristy: I have been surprised with the stories that came out from Soundtrack – the different songs that people will come up with. I actually played it at my high school reunion, and it was really striking because everyone was coming up and saying the songs from our senior class and how that carried so much of the memories. Like our songs from prom and our songs from graduation. It was really neat to be able to experience my reunion through that song. So that’s been awesome.I saw the video of you playing Soundtrack Of Your Life with the Houston Middle School Band – how did that come about?Kristy: So CMA, the Country Music Association, gives a lot of money away in grants and scholarships to music education here in the United States. Federal funding has been cut for the arts in a crazy, crazy, drastic way over here. So we have to do private fundraising and rely on amazing volunteers and the musicians and artists to step in and raise money to keep programmes running. And the CMA is the largest contributor to music education in America.So there’s a non-profit called the CMA Foundation, and it’s a really incredible part of the CMAs. They give away scholarships and grants to applicants of music teachers around the country, and we were invited to this recipient dinner where a bunch of applicants were receiving their scholarships for their school. And the cool thing that I found was different ones you can apply for. One of them that the teacher had applied for was for the school, and the other one they gave him some personal money so he could take his wife on vacation, because Lord knows every music teacher deserves a holiday in the summertime. And his wife had just had a baby so they were taking their first family trip ever.Anyway, so we were sitting at this table with the music teacher from Houston Middle School, and he was receiving his grant and scholarship. He was telling us what he was gonna do with it, how it was gonna boost his middle school band and the instruments he wanted to get and how he wanted to supplement his programme. And I was like, ‘oh my gosh, we have to come and play with you guys or sing a song with you guys’. And I thought they would wanna do a song they knew and he was like, ‘no, send me something over!’ So we did, and we had a week before school was out of session, so we got to hang out with them on their very last day of eighth grade, which is in our country and I think in yours if I’m not mistaken it goes into high school. Eighth grade is where you get to have your first kind of graduation.So it was really exciting. The local news was there and the kids did such a great job. They learned the song so well. I’d been thinking back after that experience to my education, and I’m from a tiny little town in Idaho but I’d never met someone that had been a professional musician all through school. I didn’t know that that was an option. And so I was really glad to be able to share a little bit of our experiences with these students and let them ask questions, and they got to ask our drummer and our bass player all about the instruments and what they’re playing on and how they learned to play, what got them into it. I could tell it was a really memorable experience for all of us, so we hope to carry that through and hopefully in England come to visit some of your schools, because I would love to see how y’all do it in your music education. To me that’s the most important gift you can give a kid. It’s teaching them a universal language immediately. So it would be fun to visit your schools.What does the rest of 2019 look like for you?Kristy: Yeah, Jon is on a show called Very Cavallari so he’s filming that. I think it’s coming over to Europe. And then we have touring and the EP comes out so we’ll be doing a support tour for that, and then working on finishing up the album. We hope to have the full album come out in a few months. But we’re just in the studio constantly, getting inspired.Can you tell us anything about the album?Jon: We really don’t know yet! [laughs]American Young’s new EP, Soundtrack Of Your Life, is out now.See American Young live in the UK this summer:Thursday 29 August – Bush Hall, London (with Laura Oakes)Friday 30 August – Soup Kitchen, Manchester (with Gary Quinn)Sunday 1 September – Millport Country Music Festival, Millport, Isle of Cumbraelast_img read more

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AFCON 2019: Tunisia earn draw against Mali

first_imgStage set for 2019 AFCON draw Tunisia’s forward Wahbi Khazri (C) celebrates his goal with teammates during the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations (CAN) Group E football match between Tunisia and Mali at the Suez Stadium on June 28, 2019. (Photo by FADEL SENNA / AFP) (Photo credit should read FADEL SENNA/AFP/Getty Images) Mali’s forward Moussa Marega (L) is tackled by Tunisia’s midfielder Ghaylen Chaalali (R) during the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations (CAN) Group E football match between Tunisia and Mali at the Suez Stadium on June 28, 2019. (Photo credit FADEL SENNA/AFP/Getty Images)Tunisia salvaged a 1-1 draw against Mali on Friday in their second Group E match at the Suez Stadium in Suez.Wahbi Khazri’s deflected 70th minute free-kick, which wrong-footed Malian goalkeeper Djigui Diarra, earned the Eagles of Carthage a point.Mali took the lead in the 60th minute after Tunisian goalkeeper Mouez Hassen fumbled a corner-kick by Diadie Samassekou into his own net.Tunisia edged ball possession compared to Mali but both teams failed to create chances in front of goal mustering two attempts on target each.“We would have felt better if we had won but a draw is not a bad result,” Mali coach Mohamed Magassouba said after the match.“We are satisfied we didn’t lose but definitely not satisfied because we didn’t win,” Tunisia’s coach Alain Giresse said.Mali remain top of Group E on four points while Tunisia move up to second on two points, one ahead of Angola who are still to play Mauritania.Tunisia will play Mauritania in their final group game on Tuesday at the Suez Stadium, while Mali face Angola simultaneously in Ismailia.Related AFCON 2019 draw: Hosts Egypt land tricky group with DR Congocenter_img Cameroon to host AFCON 2019last_img read more

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