Winter and Indigenous Products Fair in Zagreb

first_imgIn order not to lose the custom of winter preparation, to highlight traditional products in relation to other products on the market, and to help small producers in marketing their products and connecting with consumers, the Ministry of Agriculture launched the project “Winter and Indigenous Products Fair” .For the second year in a row, the Fair of Winter and Indigenous Products will be held on Ban Jelačić Square in Zagreb, from October 28 to 30, and visitors will be able to visit the Fair every day from 8:00 to 20:00, except on Sunday, October 30. when the Fair closes at 13 p.m. “The great interest of visitors to last year’s event and the satisfaction of exhibitors, encouraged us to enable the participation of as many as 118 exhibitors from all Croatian counties, and in the organization of the 2nd Winter and Indigenous Products Fair, in addition to the Ministry of Agriculture and the City of Zagreb. young farmers. ” point out from the Ministry of AgricultureThe first Fair of Winter and Indigenous Products was organized last year in Zagreb’s central square, where 77 small producers who produce winter and other indigenous products were presented, including those whose names are protected by labels from the quality system for agricultural and food products. The opening ceremony of the Fair will be on Friday, October 28 at 12:00. “Our country has a rich gastronomic tradition and offer, and our goal is that as many domestic indigenous products as possible soon find their way to European designations of origin and geographical origin. The Ministry will always be at the service of producers and help them reach their goal together. Winter is traditionally prepared throughout Croatia, and who is not skilled in their own kitchen or is eager for new ideas and tastes, let them join us at the three-day fair in the center of Zagreb. “, he said Minister Tomislav Tolušić on the eve of the opening of this year’s Fair of Winter and Indigenous Products.Photo: Dražen Bota / Source: CNTBGreat story and project, support indigenous products and small producers, they make a living from it, and so should our tourism. This is the meaning of tourism – getting to know and exploring a different way of life and thus a new gastronomy. We have something to be proud of and we have something to show to the world, we just have to sell what we are or in other words, let’s be what we are – Croats, that must be our tourist product.By the way, Croatia currently has Krk prosciutto, Extra virgin olive oil Cres, Neretva mandarins, Ogulin sauerkraut / Ogulin sauerkraut, Baranja kulen, Lika potato, Istrian potato, Istrian sauerkraut on the list of autochthonous treasures, ie protected designations of origin and protected geographical indications. , Dalmatian prosciutto, Poljički soparnik, Zagorje turkey, Krk olive oil, Korčula olive oil, Pag lamb and Šolta olive oillast_img read more

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Democratic Bill Safeguarding Elections Passes NM House

first_imgFrom New Mexico House Democrats:SANTA FE – In a huge victory for the voters of New Mexico, a Democratic bill ensuring safe and accessible election amidst the COVID-19 pandemic this November passes the House.Senate Bill 4, sponsored by Sen. Daniel Ivey-Soto (D-Albuquerque), and Rep. Linda Trujillo (D-Albuquerque), establishes clear guidelines for the Secretary of State and county clerks to conduct safe and efficient elections despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.Senate Bill 4 provides county clerks the option to mail ballot applications to registered voters – a proven method to increase voter participation – in addition to the currently used in-person voting convenience centers and election day polling locations. Currently two states provide a county option for casting votes by mail.“Despite the pandemic, we’re safeguarding our democracy by making it easier than ever for New Mexico’s voters to cast their ballots in November,” said Rep. Linda Trujillo (D-Santa Fe). “The COVID-19 pandemic has created many challenges, but voting should not be one of them. This bill is the culmination of a lot of work between many stakeholders and we should all be proud that our right to vote is going to be safeguarded.”Senate Bill 4 also responds to the hurdles of holding elections in an ongoing pandemic, containing provisions that require Personal Protection Equipment for poll workers, requires use of COVID-safe practices, and authorizes the Department of Health Secretary to establish county-specific public health requirements in response to regional public health concerns. Counties will also provide polling locations within hard-hit tribal nations and pueblos – an issue area that has been a point of contention in past elections.Senate Bill 4 also adds intelligent barcodes to ballots for better tracking, and allows additional time before an election to request an absentee ballot, and more explicit instruction on mail-in deadlines. These measures expire after the 2020 general election.New Mexico House Democrats believe voting should be safe, easy and accessible. Senate Bill 4 is a big step in achieving our goal of removing all obstacles between New Mexicans and their right to vote. Senate Bill 4 passed the House in a 44-26 vote, and now goes to the Governor’s desk.last_img read more

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Counting the costs of the spending review cuts

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DataOnline announces new rep for India

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Finer matters

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Saxophone player, Fred, turns 90

first_imgFred May, 90, with another resident at the home, Susan Alexander, 84. The secret to longevity is healthy living, says Heideveld’s Fred May who turned 90 last week. The Oakhaven Place resident celebrated his birthday on Tuesday January 22, with many well wishes from staff and fellow residents at the seniors home.As a baby, Fred was adopted bya family in Welcome Estate. Whenhe was 3, he went to stay with his adoptive father’s mother in Kensington. Growing up, there was hard, he says. His grandmother owned a laundromat and he and the other children in the house had to wash clothes every day after school while his mates played soccer. “I finished Grade 8, and then I went to work. I wanted to be independent, so I worked in a factory as a machinist for about two years. “I left my gran’s place after that and went to stay at different places on my own. “I then joined the building trade, and I remember working on different sites in Woodstock and Salt River, and I did that for 10 years. “I was the foreman of the labourers.”Later, in his 30s, he worked as an ambulance driver for 10 years before starting his own Vibracrete company, which he ran for 12 years. Later, he worked as a salesman in a Rondebosch shoe shop. In 1951, he married Julia Mayer, whom he had met at an Athlone church. The couple adopted a child who now lives in New Zealand. Julia died 20 years ago.“Julia was a very churchly woman, very quiet,” says Fred. “She never smoked or drank, and I didn’t either, and that’s why I lived so long,” he says.In his later years, he was a manager of a Strandfontein holiday house and, in his 70s, he was a caretaker at a Heathfield school. He lived in Athlone after retiring, but in 2014, he moved to Oakhaven Place. “It’s lovely to be in a place where we can chat to each other andspeak about our experiences. Totalk to people your age who understand what you are saying is wonderful.”Fred has long enjoyed playing the saxophone and still belts out melodies at various church services throughout the week. “I have always enjoyed playing gospel music and I always wrote my own music,” he says.last_img read more

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School adapts to new learning environment

first_imgShandre Reid has her temperature checked before entering the school. The reopening of schools has seen pupils and teachers having to adapt quickly to a learning environment very different to the one they left behind before lockdown.Grade 7s and matrics have been returning to schools since the start of the month as part of a staggered reopening of the country’s education system.About half of Belmore Primary School’s Grade 7s were back on Monday June 8, with slightly more the next day. However, principal Carol Poole said most parents had then kept their children home on Wednesday because of the heavy rains.The Hanover Park school has a Grade 7 cohort of 90 pupils, usually split between three classrooms, but because of physical-distancing requirements they now use nine classrooms with about 12 pupils in each. Grade 5 and Grade 6 teachers have been roped in to teach Grade 7s to make this change possible.Ms Poole said the children had had some anxiety on the first day about having new teachers or being split from their friends, but, for the most part, they were happy to be back at school.“They were so happy to see each other, and some of them reached out to hug each other but quickly realised that they couldn’t, and teachers also stepped in and reminded them.”The school day starts at 8am, but the pupils have to be screened first so they only get to their classes at about 8.30am. “In the class, their desks are 1.5 metres apart, and whenever they leave and enter the class they have to sanitise their hands. “Pupils must also change their mask to a clean mask at midday everyday,” Ms Poole said.The pupils had orientation training on the first day back to learn about Covid-19 safety regulations and the new rules at school.Ms Poole said parents who had opted to keep their children home for now would need to fetch their children’s school work so they did not fall behind.Teachers posted themselves at bathrooms to check pupils were sanitising before returning to class, and monitored pupils during the staggered break times to enforce physical distancing.Tape marks off areas in the hall, playground and other parts of the school to help pupils keep their distance from each other. The curriculum has been adjusted to make it easier for pupils to get through important work by year end. “The June exams have been cancelled, and pupils will write exams in November,” Ms Poole said. “Instead of the school year ending in the first week of December, schools will now close on the 15th of December, which means that school holidays will be shorter.”As if Covid-19 isn’t enough of a problem, Belmore Primary is in the heart of an area rocked by gang violence, andMs Poole said it had nothing like the resources of schools in more affluent areas. For example, teachers could not simply email assignments to parents and expect them to print it out for their children.“Our pupils need us to do our best for them; they depend on us,” Ms Poole said. “We want the best for our pupils, and we are trying to do things to the best of our ability with what we have. We want good things for our pupils, and we are trying to uplift our community and the lives of our pupils. We are trying to do the best in this situation.”Ms Poole said her teachers’ greatest fear was that the country had not yet hit its infection peak and the Western Cape had the highest number of cases.Belmore Primary Grade 7 teacher Charnelle Arendse said lesson plans and assessment programmes had been adapted to the unprecedented circumstances.“Increasing Covid-19 cases and soaring death rates are but a few of the challenges we face daily, and we are truly trying our best to teach amidst it all.” Grade 7 pupil Ubaid Petersen said he was glad to be back at school and with his friends but disappointed he couldn’t play soccer.His mother, Sumayah Isaacs, said she had been anxious about sending him back but had felt better about it after learning of the school’s safety measures.“When he gets home, he goes straight to the bathroom to wash and change his clothes, and I wash his clothes he had on. I make duah that all children and educators stay safe through this time including all of us,” she said.last_img read more

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Boy, 13, who had heart transplant dies on 1st day of school

first_imgBoy, 13, who had heart transplant dies on 1st day of school GOSHEN, Ohio (AP) A 13-year-old boy who received a heart transplant months ago has died on the first day of school.WCPO-TV in Cincinnati reports Peyton West died Thursday. His family says he was born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and needed three open-heart surgeries before his fifth birthday. He had to have a transplant when his health deteriorated in March.Peyton’s father says he seemed fine Thursday. He smiled for a photo that morning before leaving their home in Goshen, about 31 miles northeast of Cincinnati.On the way to school, Peyton told his father he didn’t feel right. He was taken to a hospital, where he died. His family says they still don’t know what happened. Published: August 19, 2017 2:34 PM EDT SHARE Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know.last_img read more

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Put court closures on hold, say solicitors and magistrates

first_imgLegal professional bodies have called for the government to halt its court closure programme while technology to replace physical justice is fully tested.The Ministry of Justice last week closed a consultation on proposals to shut eight court buildings across England in the latest attempt to consolidate the courts estate.The affected buildings are Banbury Magistrates’ Court, Maidenhead Magistrates’ Court, Cambridge Magistrates’ Court, Chorley Magistrates’ Court, Fleetwood Magistrates’ Court, Northallerton Magistrates’ Court, Wandsworth County Court and Blackfriars Crown Court.The government insists that the legal profession needs to take a ‘broader view’ of what access to justice means for modern users, and consider what cases actually need a physical hearing.While lawyers practising near to each affected court have made their own case against closures, the Law Society says the whole programme needs to be put on hold while technology for remote justice is tested, evaluated and proven to work.‘There has been no proper assessment of what physical infrastructure will still be needed after new technologies are in place,’ said president Joe Egan. ‘If current proposals are implemented unchanged, people will lose access to their local courts and potentially have to travel hundreds of miles to alternative sites.’The Society’s response stresses that closures have serious practical and cost implications for victims, parties and witnesses: police and prison delivery services may face extra costs, lawyers on legal aid rates must absorb extra travel costs and time, and hearings may be ineffective if witnesses cannot attend.In its consultation response, the Magistrates Association said victims and witnesses must always have the choice to give evidence in person or remotely, and that taking away their local court removes that choice. The group expresses misgivings about the use of alternative buildings, requiring the provision of extra security staff, separate waiting rooms and extra conference areas.There is also concern at the potential ‘devaluing’ of local justice, with magistrates sitting further from their niehgbourhoods and news organisations less likely to cover court proceedings if they cannot easily get to local courts.‘We have serious concerns that more court closures and increased use of technology as a default will fundamentally undermine the fairness and effectiveness of the system,’ said the association. ‘More research is needed to fully understand any negative impacts on fair participation and therefore the legitimacy of the system as a result of removing physical access to hearings.’last_img read more

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Emma Watson visits Malawi to fight child marriages

first_imgHarry Potter movies star Emma Watson condemned child marriages during her visit to MalawiThe 26-year-old British actress was in Malawi as a goodwill ambassador for UN (United Nations) Women on the eve of International Day of the Girl Child, campaigning against the practise of teenagers being forced into marriage.Malawi lawmakers recently passed the Marriage, Divorce and Family Relations Act, making child marriage illegal, raising the minimum age of marriage to 18 but some local tribal chiefs have not recognised the legislation.Watson met with traditional leaders who have championed the annulment of child marriages in their communities.“Meeting with young girls, who like many in their country, are struggling with poverty and were pressured into early marriage, depriving them of their education in the process, made me realize just how important it is for women to be able to make their own choices, said Ms. Watsonlast_img read more

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