Family owned hair salon offers haircuts to Notre Dame community

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Zak Emmons The University Hair Stylists, in the basement of the LaFortune Student Center, is run as a family business by the Emmons family. Jeff Emmon’s founded the salon in 1979. His son Zak is the current owner.“Years before I was born, he got his cosmetology license and was doing hair at a place off campus and happened to cut a couple of gentlemen’s hair who were working in the administration here,” Emmons said. “ … They were like, ‘Hey Jeff, I’m thinking about opening up like a salon, like, you know, the barbershop or salon. We’re interviewing potential proprietors, and you should throw your hat in the ring.’ So he did, and he had the references, so he got the space. Basically they just threw up a wall in the middle the barbershop in Badin Hall and it kind of grew from that.”Since Notre Dame had opened its doors to women for the first time in 1972, Zak Emmons said this change and addition of the salon was needed to fulfill the changing needs of the University.Zak Emmons did not always know he wanted to take over his father’s business and initially used doing hair as a way to put off going to college. Growing up, he frequently worked in the salon, and about 10 years ago officially purchased the business from his father.When LaFortune was being redone in the mid 1980s, University Hair Stylists was able to expand when it moved to the space it now occupies across from Pizza Hut and Taco Bell in the basement. However, Emmons said even with the normal change that comes with an establishment, the salon still primarily cuts men’s hair.“One thing that’s similar is that we still do more guys’ hair,” Emmons said. “We’re a barbershop that does color and eyebrow wax and that sort of thing … about 75 percent of our business is still guys. That’s kind of one thing that’s never changed I suppose. I would say like every year we probably get a little more of a female clientele.”According to Zak Emmons, there are nine employees that currently work at University Hair Stylists, many of whom have varying talents other than giving a simple haircut. He said the business does not have much turnover, and a handful of employees have been with the business for over a decade. Emmons also has three sisters, two of whom have worked in the salon at varying points.“We’re in this interesting spot and conundrum where it’s hard to do both really well or at least appeal to both really well as far as like offering certain services,” he said. “We’re a barbershop by and large, but we do have some talent. For example, Diana [Roop] does excellent updos for weddings and stuff. In a dream world, I’d love to have a dedicated salon space and more of a haircut and barbershop space as well so you could have a little more privacy.”Roop, who has worked for University Hair Stylists for 26 years, said working on a university campus differs from working in a normal salon because of the constant changes in clientele.“I would say our clientele changes a lot more over the years,” she said. “While you get new students every year, every four years your students are gone. So you lose students, and that’s kind of sad because you don’t keep track of them as long, but it also keeps our clientele young and fresh.”Roop cited a change in what people want from getting their hair cut as a help in the salon’s growth over the years.“We have definitely picked up business over the years. I think more students are used to stylists and not just barbers, so that’s helped us improve,” Roop said.Zak Emmons also said working on a university campus is a unique experience, and that it feels like an “oasis.”“I love being on campus, especially coming from South Bend, a smallish Midwest sort of community. It’s pretty homogenized,” he said. “Especially with grad students or teachers, you end up getting to know them for like five, six, 10 years. You just end up knowing their names and you talk about kids and family and that sort of stuff. I just think it’s super interesting and fascinating to be here in this oasis of culture in South Bend that I would never have experienced otherwise.”Tags: LaFortune Student Center, LaFun, University Hair Stylists Cutting hair ran in the family for Zak Emmons, who has been the owner of University Hair Stylists in the basement of LaFortune Student Center for the last decade. University Hair Stylists, in some form, has been around for about 39 years and was originally owned by Emmons’ father, Jeff Emmons, who opened the salon in 1979.Jeff Emmons, who is currently described by his son as being “by and large mostly retired” from working at the salon, happened upon the Notre Dame position when he was cutting the hair of a couple Notre Dame faculty who were trying to find someone to open a salon alongside the existing barbershop in Badin Hall that would cater to both men and women.last_img read more

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Pounding out a plan: House, Senate at odds on teacher pay raises

first_img Patrick ‘kowtowing?’The politics surrounding the Senate’s teacher pay raise bill this session are unusual, with conservative Republican Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, who has previously clashed with educators, advocating for a proposal many teachers like. Meanwhile, conservative group Empower Texans, a key contributor to Patrick’s campaign, has come out against the bill, with one employee criticizing conservatives like Patrick for “kowtowing” to liberals.That bill has divided the education community, with superintendents and school boards arguing they need more flexibility with additional funds and many teachers supporting the directed raises.Huberty said Tuesday that the House would “certainly have a hearing on that [Senate] bill,” but said the school finance panel that worked to develop recommendations for lawmakers did not include across-the-board raises.He said HB 3 provides more opportunity for local school boards and superintendents to decide how to use increased funding. More than 85 House members have signed on as co-authors of HB 3 and, in a public show of support, many of them were present at Tuesday’s press conference.At least one educator group is calling for an across-the-board raise. HB 3 “will provide more classroom resources and may give some teachers a pay raise. But we need an across-the-board, permanent pay raise for every teacher guaranteed in the law and an increase in funding to also assure pay raises for all school employees,” said Noel Candelaria, president of the Texas State Teachers Association, in a statement Tuesday.Dueling proposalsThe dueling proposals highlight how a lot of negotiating still needs to be done in order to get both chambers on the same page. Although Senate and House lawmakers previously said they wanted to have a joint press conference releasing identical school finance bills, the Senate’s education chair Larry Taylor , R-Friendswood, was not present at Tuesday’s press conference and has not filed a companion bill. He is expected to file Senate Bill 4 later this week, which will likely not be identical to HB 3.Overall, HB 3 covers three priorities — teacher pay, property tax reform and school finance reform — that Abbott named “emergency items” in his State of the State address last month, meaning state lawmakers can move faster to pass them. Of the $9 billion proposed in the bill, $6 billion would go to school finance reform and $3 billion would go to property tax relief.At 186 pages, HB 3’s wide-ranging set of policy proposals would also:• Increase the base funding per Texas student by $890, bringing it from $5,140 to $6,030. That base number has not been changed in four years and is not adjusted for inflation.• Compress all school districts’ tax rates by 4 cents per 100 of taxable property value, which could save the owner of a home appraised at $250,000 about $100 annually in school district taxes.• Help reduce recapture payments by about $3 billion. Recapture, also known as Robin Hood, is a state program that takes excess funding from wealthier school districts with higher property values and redistributes it to poorer school districts and charter schools.• Help fund full-day pre-K for eligible students.• Provide $140 million for a program to help school districts recruit and retain teachers.• Give an incentive to school districts that want to offer an extra 30 days of half-day instruction for elementary school studies during the summer.Cassi Pollock contributed reporting.The Texas Tribune is a nonpartisan, nonprofit media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues. House Public Education Committee Chairman Dan Huberty, R-Houston, and House Speaker Dennis Bonnen, R-Angleton, laid out their reform proposal at a news conference Tuesday, calling for raising minimum salaries for a broad group of educators, increasing health and pension benefits, and offering opportunities for merit pay programs. That approach differs substantially from the $4 billion proposal that sailed through the Senate on Monday that would provide mandatory across-the-board $5,000 raises for classroom teachers and librarians.When asked about the Senate’s proposal, Bonnen said: “I don’t know how you call a $5,000 across-the-board teacher pay raise … with no discussion of reducing recapture, no discussion of reducing property taxes, no discussion of early childhood education, no discussion of incentivizing the teachers going to a tougher school to teach” a school finance plan.“What we have is a plan,” he added. “I think teachers are some of the smartest people in Texas, and they are going to figure out that the Texas House has a winning plan for the teachers and students in Texas.” Students fundedThe House proposal, House Bill 3, would increase the base funding per student while requiring school districts to meet a higher minimum base pay for classroom teachers, full-time counselors, full-time librarians and full-time registered nurses. Many districts already exceed the current minimum salaries for educators at different experience levels.It would work hand-in-hand with House Bill 9, filed Monday by the speaker’s brother, Rep. Greg Bonnen, R-Friendswood, which would increase the state’s contribution to Teacher Retirement System pensions over time, while keeping active member and district contributions the same.HB 3 would also provide funding for districts that choose to offer a merit pay program, rating their teachers and providing the top-rated ones with more money — modeled on a Dallas ISD program touted among lawmakers. The Senate is expected to include a similar proposal in its own school finance bill later this week.center_img By Aliyya SwabyThe Texas Tribunetexastribune.orgWith Texas House lawmakers unveiling their long-awaited school finance proposal Tuesday and the Senate’s version likely close behind, teacher pay appears to be emerging as one of the biggest sticking points between the two chambers.last_img read more

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THE MOVIE GUY — ‘Terminator’ told you that he’d be back

first_img “Terminator: Dark Fate” isn’t a great movie, but it’s a far cry better than the past three films.Movie reviews by Sean, “The Movie Guy,” are each week in “The Port Arthur News” and seen weekly on KFDM and Fox4. Sean welcomes your comments via email at smcbride@sbgtv.com. This is all well and good, but the filmmakers feel the need to top themselves with each successive action spectacle. Things can get a bit silly, such as a fight scene set at the bottom of a lake. There’s a fine line between cutting-edge and over-the-top. “Terminator: Dark Fate” has trouble holding that line.Still, the girl power ethic of this film is a lot of fun. It’s great to see Hamilton back on screen, with her iconic character. Davis makes a very good action hero and even Reyes grows into a capable heroine. Throw in an impressive performance by Luna in the villain role, and yes, the cheesy guilty pleasure thrill of letting Arnold reprise his greatest role ever, and you have a fun B-Movie, that should please most of the fans of the franchise. If that’s not enough, Linda Hamilton is back playing the gun-toting Sarah Connor. Her entire life revolves around killing terminators whenever they pop into our world. Arnold Schwarzenegger also returns, once again playing the evil robot turned heroic good guy. He’s the biggest star in the franchise, but in this latest film, he frequently takes a backseat to the other characters.The other figure returning to the franchise is writer/producer James Cameron. He hasn’t been part of this world since “T2” back in 1991. I suppose that his involvement gives this latest movie some credibility, but it doesn’t exactly elevate the movie above its genre limitations.This is still a B-movie action flick, notable for relentless action and special effects. We do get a lot of chase sequences, many of which are quite thrilling. The special effects are also quite good. The twist this time out is that the terminator can separate himself from his metallic skeleton, forcing our heroes to battle two deadly monsters, when one is lethal enough.center_img Remember those last three “Terminator” movies? Paramount Pictures is asking you to forget that they ever existed, as they attempt to re-launch the “Terminator” franchise with a sixth film. This new movie should now be viewed as number three in the franchise’s official chronology.Yes, it’s a bit confusing, but no more so than those last few films that strained to meld a credible story with thrilling action sequences and cutting-edge special effects. This latest installment, “Terminator: Dark Fate” goes back to the basics in the story department, but it still suffers from the mindless bombast issues that made the past few films so disposable.The story once again involves a killer robot from the future (Gabriel Luna) traveling back in time to kill the woman (Natalie Reyes) who is fated to be a big part to the upcoming war between humanity and the terminators. Mackenzie Davis plays an augmented human who is also sent back in time to protect the woman, and it’s a lot of fun watching her go mano-a-mano with the unrelenting killing machine.last_img read more

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Betrayal, Starring Rachel Weisz, Daniel Craig & Rafe Spall, Set to Open on Broadway a Week Early

first_img View Comments Betrayal tells the story of Robert (Craig) and Emma (Weisz), a married couple with trouble brewing under the surface. Unbeknownst to Robert, Emma has been having a long-time affair with his best friend Jerry (Spall), who is also married. Betrayal premiered at London’s National Theatre in 1978 before opening on Broadway in 1980 starring Blythe Danner as Emma, Roy Scheider as Robert and Raul Julia as Jerry. Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz and Rafe Spall will take their Broadway bows in Betrayal earlier than expected. The new production of Harold Pinter’s 1978 drama will open officially on October 27, one week earlier than their initially scheduled opening night date of November 3. Directed by 10-time Tony winner Mike Nichols, Betrayal begins performances October 1 and is scheduled to play a limited engagement through January 5, 2014.center_img The new production will include scenic design by Ian MacNeil, costume design by Ann Roth, lighting design by Brian MacDevitt and sound design by Scott Lehrer.last_img read more

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Governor, congressmen detail $36.9 million Race to the Top grant

first_imgGovernor Peter Shumlin, joined by Senator Bernie Sanders, Representative Peter Welch, and a representative from Senator Patrick Leahy’s office, today explained how funding from the $36.9 million federal Early Learning Race to the Top Grant will ensure all Vermont children, including low-income and high-needs kids, will be ready to succeed when they enter school.’ They said the goals of the grant are to expand public awareness of the importance of early education, significantly increase the number of participants in the Vermont Step Ahead Recognition System (’STARS’ awards early learning and pre-kindergarten programs for additional quality training), and focus services on high-needs children.’ ‘These are dollars that expand training, nutrition programs, and other services that directly benefit children, especially those who are most at risk of struggling or failing in school,’ the Governor said. ‘Vermont’s kids will benefit immediately from these programs. The state will benefit long into the future with a better educated workforce, more high-quality early childhood opportunities, and a fully-coordinated and accessible range of health, education and developmental services so every Vermont family gets the level of support they need.’’ ‘An educated Vermont is a prosperous and better Vermont. Vermont has always understood the importance of early childhood education and how effective it can be in helping children break the cycle of poverty,’ said Sen. Leahy. ‘This funding will allow Vermont to reach an even greater number of young children and expand their programs to ensure all children have access to quality, early education. I am excited to see the great work made possible by this federal partnership with Vermont in the next few years and the difference it will make for so many Vermont families.’’ ‘Psychologists tell us that, in terms of human development, the most important years are birth through four years of age,’ said Sen. Sanders. ‘Yet, in terms of early childhood education, our nation does a very inadequate job in making quality pre-kindergarten education available to working families. This major federal grant will significantly improve early childhood education in our state and better prepare our kids for school and the challenges and opportunities of life.’ I am very appreciative that the Department of Education provided Vermont with this major grant.’’ ‘This is great news for Vermont and recognition of the quality of our education system and its leaders,’ said Rep. Welch. ‘Investments in early childhood education give children the best opportunity to succeed in school and in their future careers. Vermont has distinguished itself with this integrated, statewide approach to serving and educating children.’’ Some of the key items expected to be funded through the grant are:’ ‘· $6.4 million to provide grants to targeted communities for initiatives including after-school programs, local food hubs, transportation grants, community centers, and similar efforts designed to improve nutrition, support families, and increase access to early education;‘· $3.5 million to provide annual STARS financial awards for high-quality early childhood programs and additional awards to provide nutritional food to children in the programs;‘· $1.5 million for T.E.A.C.H. Scholarships for early childhood educators to receive degrees or advance education;‘· $1.3 million to train and support early childhood educators to meet health, nutrition and physical activity needs of all children; and‘· Other programs include finalizing standards for early education care statewide, expanding training, screening young children, and ensuring appropriate services are available for children and families in need.’ The grant will also help expand home visits for pre-natal and post-natal households, create an apprenticeship program for early educators, provide for administration and outcomes measurement for the programs, and much more.’ Vermont was one of six states, out of 17 that applied, to receive funding through the Race to the Top federal grant. The other states were Kentucky, Michigan, Georgia, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The permitted uses of the grant funds are tightly prescribed by the federal government, and final budgets from winning states are due in March.‘These grant funds will significantly accelerate Vermont’s early childhood education efforts,’ said Gov. Shumlin. ‘But it is important to remember that these grant-funded programs are only part of the state’s early education agenda.’  I also support bringing universal pre-kindergarten programs to those school districts that do not already offer them.’  Our children’s future will be brighter because of all of these efforts.’Source: Shumlin’s office. 12.23.2013last_img read more

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Governor’s Outdoor Recreation Economic Steering Committee announces public forums

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The Vermont Outdoor Recreation Economic Collaborative (VOREC) steering committee will host a series of public forums to gather input from Vermonters on how to leverage and strengthen the State’s outdoor recreation assets to grow the economy. The first is September 12 and they run through October 24.The dates and locations of the public forums are:  Tuesday, September 12th: Best Western Plus, 45 Blush Hill Rd, Waterbury, 6-8 pm.  Monday, September 25th: Island Pond Town Hall, 49 Mill St, Island Pond, 6-8 pm.  Tuesday, October 3rd:  Community College of Vermont, 60 West St, Rutland, 6-8 pm.  Tuesday, October 10th:   St. Albans City Hall, 100 North Main Street, St. Albans, 6-8 pm.  Monday, October 16th:  The Evening Star Grange, 1008 East-West Rd, East Dummerston, 6-8 pm.  Monday, October 23rd:  Hartford Town Hall, 171 Bridge St White River Junction, 6-8 pm.  Tuesday, October 24th: West Mountain Inn, 144 W. Mountain Inn Rd, Arlington, 6-8 pm. The public forums will be open house style, and will solicit feedback and ideas on how Vermont might achieve the following principal objectives identified by the private-public steering committee:         Promote business opportunities.        Increase participation opportunities.        Strengthen the quality and extent of our recreational resources.        Strengthen the stewardship of our recreational resources.“We hope that local businesses, public officials, organizations and the public will provide their ideas about specific actions related to our four main objectives,” said Michael Snyder, Commissioner of Forests, Parks and Recreation and VOREC chair.  “VOREC can only be successful through inclusion and collaboration with all stakeholders, so we want to hear from all Vermonters.”  In June, Governor Phil Scott signed an Executive Order (link is external)tasking the 15-member steering committee to provide recommendations on how to promote prudent stewardship and economic growth. Input from public forums will be incorporated into the recommendations.”There is genuine consensus among the VOREC committee that a stronger outdoor recreation economy in Vermont has the ability to benefit other economic sectors across the state as well,” said Drew Simmons, VOREC member and owner of Pale Morning Media in Waitsfield. For people who cannot attend an in-person meeting, or prefer to submit their ideas electronically, an online survey will go live on September 12th on the VOREC webpage: www.fpr.vermont.gov/VOREC(link is external).  For more information about this initiative, please visit www.fpr.vermont.gov/VOREC(link is external). Source: Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation 8.24.2017last_img read more

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Birth announcement: Hudson Kreigh Gilman

first_imgSeth and Sarah Gilman of Prairie Village are overjoyed to announce the birth of their son Hudson Kreigh Gilman. Hudson arrived at 12:45 p.m. on June 13. He weighed 8.1 pounds and was 20.5 inches.If you’ve got a birth, engagement or wedding announcement you’d like to share with our readers, submit it here.last_img

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Jacksonville magistrate needed

first_img December 15, 2009 Regular News Jacksonville magistrate needed Jacksonville magistrate neededcenter_img The U.S. District Court, Middle District of Florida, is currently accepting applications for a full-time magistrate judge position in Jacksonville.To be qualified for appointment, an applicant must be, and have been for at least five years, a member in good standing of the bar of the highest court of a state, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or the Virgin Islands of the United States, and have been engaged in the active practice of law for a period of at least five years (with some substitutes authorized); be competent to perform all duties of the office; be of good moral character; be emotionally stable and mature; be committed to equal justice under the law; be in good health; be patient and courteous; and be capable of deliberation and decisiveness; be younger than 70 years old; and not be related to a judge of the district court.The term of office is eight years.Applicants must use the official application form, which may be obtained at the intake counters of the clerk’s offices in Jacksonville, Ft. Myers, Ocala, Orlando, and Tampa or at the court’s Web site at www.flmd.uscourts.gov. The original and 13 copies of the completed application, including a recent and in-depth writing sample, must be submitted only by the applicant personally and received by Sheryl L. Loesch, Clerk of Court, United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida, Attn: Magistrate Judge Applications, 401 W. Central Blvd., Suite 2100, Orlando 32801-0210 no later than January 29, 2010. Applications by fax will not be accepted.All applications will be kept confidential, unless the applicant consents to disclosure, and all applications will be examined only by members of the Merit Selection Panel and the judges of the district court. The panel’s deliberations will remain confidential.last_img read more

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Tallahassee Bar seeks Lifetime Professionalism Award applications

first_imgTallahassee Bar seeks Lifetime Professionalism Award applications Tallahassee Bar seeks Lifetime Professionalism Award applications Nominations are due by November 4 for the Tallahassee Bar Association’s Lifetime Professionalism Award. The annual award honors one TBA-member lawyer, judge, or law professor who for a period of at least 25 years has demonstrated professionalism and dedication to the legal profession and legal community through civil, community, or legal service. Nomination forms are online at TallahasseeBar.org. The 2016 award will be presented at the Tallahassee Bar Association’s holiday party in December. For more information, contact Joann Gore at 850-702-5008 or gorej@tallahasseebar.org. October 15, 2016 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Niger, Tanzania probe two unknown-illness outbreaks

first_imgHealth officials in Africa are investigating two separate outbreaks of unknown illness, a small one in Niger that has killed nearly a third of patients and a larger one in Tanzania in which no deaths have been reported so far, the World Health Organization (WHO) African regional office said today.Deadly outbreak in NigerIn Niger, the outbreak as of the middle of October had sickened 23 patients in two villages in Tera District, located in the country’s Tillaberi Region. The area is located in far southwestern Niger, not far from the Burkina Faso and Mali borders. Seven deaths have been reported, according to the WHO report.Symptoms included fever, dysphagia, nosebleeds, vomiting, neck pain, submandibular lymphadenopathy, and ulceronecrotic tonsil lesions. However, none of the patients had a pseudomembrane at the back of the throat, which is a hallmark feature of diphtheria. Also, nosebleed, which occurred in five patients, isn’t a common diphtheria symptom.Throat swabs from five patients were negative for diphtheria, and blood tests from two patients were negative for mononucleosis. These tests were done at the Centre for Medical and Health Research (CERMES), a Pasteur Institute lab that operates under Niger’s public health ministry.Given the unusual symptoms, negative lab tests for diphtheria, and high case-fatality rate, further investigations are needed to determine the outbreak’s scope, source, and risk of further spread, the WHO said. The office said the WHO is assisting Niger’s health ministry investigators and has deployed an epidemiologist to provide technical support in coordinating the work.Almost 800 cases in TanzaniaMeanwhile, Tanzania’s health ministry is investigating an unknown disease in Kasulu district, located in the northwestern part of the country not far from the Burundi border. Since late August, 794 illnesses have been reported, none of them fatal, according to a separate WHO outbreak report.The main symptoms are fever, headache, vomiting, and abdominal pain, but tests for dengue fever conducted on some of the patients were negative. The WHO said more tests are under way to determine the cause of the outbreak and that health officials are weighing several possibilities, including dengue fever, yellow fever, and hepatitis A or E.In response to the outbreak, health officials have intensified health education about environmental hygiene and sanitation and have strengthened surveillance and lab analysis of samples, according to the report.Monitoring challengesSharon Sanders, editor-in-chief of the infectious disease message board FluTrackers, told CIDRAP News that the group’s volunteers follow developments in the two countries, but added that Africa is a challenging area to monitor, because the news coming out of the region is sparse. She said malaria and cholera seem to be chronic in the area over the past months, and health officials in Niger recently detected the country’s first diphtheria cases in 7 years.She said it’s not unusual to see news stories about “unknown” diseases appear in the African media, which are usually resolved in a few weeks after global health groups arrive to assist with testing. However, Sanders said it is unusual for a WHO division to report an unknown disease outbreak.”We are going to carefully watch this,” Sanders said, adding that reports of nasal bleeding in the Niger outbreak patients are worrying and that she would like to know if bleeding is a feature in any of the Tanzanian cases.See also:Nov 20 WHO Africa regional office Niger outbreak noticeNov 20 WHO Africa regional office Tanzania outbreak noticelast_img read more

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