Learn Secret Gutenberg Tips on September 14

first_imgHave you started using Gutenberg, the new WordPress editor currently in beta testing? Wondering if there are faster or easier ways to edit in Gutenberg?Or have you run into some issues, but haven’t figured out how to resolve the problems? Then you don’t want to miss this week’s Gutenberg YouTube Live talk and Q & A hosted by my friend Birgit Pauli-Haack on Friday, September 14, 2018. She’ll share all kinds of useful tips to make it easier for you to work with Gutenberg. The talk is free and open to any content creator, blogger, or do-it-yourself website owner.What You’ll LearnGutenberg keeps improving and adding features with each new release. But it also has several shortcuts and hidden features you might not know about. At the YouTube Live talk and Q & A, you’ll learn how to:Start a quote or ordered list quicklyApply code formatting around textDock the toolbar to the topAdjust the size of your editor window as well as many other Gutenberg editing tips. Have questions about Gutenberg? Ask away! There’s plenty of time in between tips to get your questions answered.Pauli-Haack will discuss what’s not quite working yet, and “gotchas” you want to avoid. In addition, you’ll learn about new features coming in Gutenberg 3.8, including Spotlight Mode and Full Screen Mode. What If You Haven’t Tried Gutenberg Yet But Still Want to Attend?I’ve got you covered! You’ll get more out of the talk if you’ve already used Gutenberg. And there are a couple ways to do that quickly.You can visit Test Gutenberg for a hands-on demo using Gutenberg. Add text, edit existing text, change colors, fonts, etc.Another option is to create a copy of your own WordPress site on a staging site, so you can test Gutenberg out with your own content, without making changes to your live site. According to the instructions in the post, it will take about 15 minutes to set up a staging site on Pantheon, for free. YouTube Live Talk DetailsThe Gutenberg YouTube Live and Q & A talk will be Friday, September 14, 2018 at 2:00pm Eastern Time. It’s free, no registration required. When I asked Pauli-Haack how long she expected it to last, she said about an hour.SummaryIf you want to:Learn shortcuts for using GutenbergAsk questions about something that you didn’t expect with GutenbergFind out about upcoming featuresjoin Pauli-Haack on Friday, September 14, 2018 at 2:00pm Eastern Time. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…Relatedlast_img read more

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This ‘robofish’ is so realistic, it can film fish without frightening them

first_imgThis ‘robofish’ is so realistic, it can film fish without frightening them By Katie LanginMar. 21, 2018 , 2:00 PM Most robotic fish are like fish out of water: They’re surprisingly poor swimmers, and they often scare away any other creatures they come in contact with. But a new robot is so realistic that fish in Fiji are falling for it—hook, line, and sinker.The remote-controlled robofish isn’t the world’s first. But the new version—called SoFi, for Soft Robotic Fish—is a step up from previous generations of robotic fish because it can be maneuvered up and down to depths of up to 18 meters. There’s a fisheye camera where its mouth would be, perfectly positioned to capture any action up ahead. And the robot doesn’t just look like a fish; it also moves like one, undulating its tail to propel itself through the water.Scientists took SoFi for six test runs in coral reefs around the Pacific island of Fiji. The robot, which is 47 centimeters long, swam at speeds of half a body length per second. That’s a tad slower than most real-life fish, which can swim two to 10 body lengths per second. And it could swim for 40 minutes at a time, controlled by a diver up to 10 meters away, the team reported today in Science Robotics. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The Fijian fish didn’t seem to mind SoFi swimming around. So the team hopes that the robot and its camera can be deployed elsewhere to help us peer into the lives of marine animals—to better see how they move, what they’re eating, and who they’re swimming around with.last_img read more

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We’ll be ruthless against terrorists: General J.J. Singh

first_imgTOP GUN: SinghA new war fighting doctrine has been propounded, the army needs modernising and it has to learn to fight in conjunction with the other two services.So General Joginder Jaswant Singh’s tenure as chief of army staff comes at a time when the Indian Army is at a doctrinal,TOP GUN: SinghA new war fighting doctrine has been propounded, the army needs modernising and it has to learn to fight in conjunction with the other two services.So General Joginder Jaswant Singh’s tenure as chief of army staff comes at a time when the Indian Army is at a doctrinal crossroads. A battle-scarred veteran, who led over 200 counter-insurgency operations in the Kashmir Valley, and a keen sportsman, the general is a straight-shooting soldier with matinee-idol looks and does not fight shy of hiding his emotions. Days after taking over as the 22nd chief of army staff, he sat down for an exclusive interview with Managing Editor Raj Chengappa and Special Correspondent Sandeep Unnithan to expound his vision for transforming the world’s third largest army into a 21st century fighting force and his plans to hook the troops onto sports like shooting. General Singh has about three years to execute his vision and, maybe, even complete his untitled work of fiction-he is a writer too-set in the backdrop of Kashmir militancy. Excerpts.Q. You are the first officer from the Sikh community to take over as the chief of army staff. What does this mean to you personally? A. I have often thought of this particular aspect. When I joined the army as a 15-year-old, the interview board asked me what my mother tongue was and I replied, Hindi. They were surprised. ‘But you are a Sikh,’ they said. As my father was in the army, I went wherever he was posted.advertisementI wasn’t and am still not fluent in Punjabi. In the army, our religion is that of our troops. In my 59 years, I have spent 41 with the Maratha troops and I know their culture, language, customs and traditions much more than I do of Sikhs. I think Iam firstly an Indian, then an Indian soldier, then a Maratha and then a Sikh.Q. After you took over, your first statement was that you wanted the army to have a human touch. How does this translate on the ground? A. It is nothing new. Our army is one of the most experienced in handling terrorism and insurgency. All of us who led our troops in sensitive assignments have achieved success when there were two things going for us-a professional attitude and a humane approach. The moment you sacrificed one of them, there was a problem.Now the acme of leadership and the real test of skills is how you can fine-tune these two requirements.Q. The recent events in the Northeast and Kashmir haven’t really helped the army’s image. A. I don’t agree that the army’s performance has been below par. By and large, it has conducted itself with credit and it is a difficult task when the enemy can be anywhere. He adopts all means fair and unfair to hit at us, to provoke and target us. Sometimes it is done deliberately to make sure that we respond and the response harms innocents so that we can be blamed.Q.But some transgressions of the army have had a negative impact. A. We are going to make the rank and file understand this-the stakes are very high and your conduct is as important as your operational efficiency. Professional skills and human touch have to blend.They have to ensure that they don’t transgress because one dead terrorist will not end terrorism. But one lady like Manorama Devi (her death sparked off protests in Manipur) can be a costly mistake. Imagine, the home minister had to make two visits, the army chief had to go too. As far as possible, we will try to stop people from conducting unprofessional operations.”I want a lean, highly professional force. We are improving our capabilities to fight in the future battlefield.” Q. What is your assessment of the ground situation in Kashmir? A. Certainly, the level of terrorism and insurgency in Kashmir has been contained. We should be able to bring this down to a very manageable level.Our endeavour will be to bring in normality to such a degree that the civil administration, police and the state machinery can deliver the goods to the people. That is my priority No. 1. We have to win over the people, they are the final determinant in any insurgency. I already see a turnaround.Q.Will you look at a further deinduction of troops from Kashmir? A. First we have to see the situation on the ground. Up to March, the place is covered by sno wand it is not the right time to make an assessment. We will wait for summer to make a conclusion on whether terrorism has been brought under control and if the force there can be pruned.Q. What is your approach towards dealing with terrorists? A.They will be dealt with ruthlessly. There will be no quarter given or taken.Q. Is the infrastructure of terror still intact across the LOC? A. According to intelligence reports, terrorist networks have not been dismantled.Q. If peace talks with Pakistan don’t succeed, will a hostile situation again develop? A. It will take some more time to make a judgement on this. The only thing I can say right now is that  from our side we will keep our guard up. We will monitor the situation closely. There is a lot of internal strife in Pakistan and it is also deeply engaged in handling terrorism and certain institutions of terrorism along its border with Afghanistan.advertisementTerrorists are probably targeting Pakistan from those centres. So the devil has come home to roost and now Pakistan is taking action against the training schools and infrastructure which it has started.Q. So is the possibility of a war with Pakistan receding? A. I wouldn’t like to say that there is a possibility of war or that it is receding. As I have said, the indicators are that Pakistan is tied down to a lot of internal challenges and trouble along its western border.Q. What is your vision for the army? A. I would like to have a highly professional but lean army. I am going to lay more stress on ensuring our human resource is kept fully motivated, trained and adequately rested. We have to develop our capabilities to protect ourselves from threat from all quarters. While the intentions of neighbours and adversaries can change anytime, capabilities cannot be built overnight.Q. How will future wars in this region be fought? A. I believe that in future battles, the winner will be the one adept at fighting in all weather conditions and at night. We are improving our competence in these areas to fight in the modern battlefield.  The revolution in military affairs and information warfare is going to have an impact on the way we fight.My motto has been ‘Fight to Win’ which means you enter a battlefield with the conviction that you will emerge victorious. I also believe that when the time comes, we will win not on points but by a knockout. This is my philosophy.last_img read more

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Veteran sports journalist K Baskaran passes away

first_imgVeteran sports journalist K Baskaran  died on March 11, 2015, after a prolonged illnessin Mumbai. He was 80 years old at the time of death.Baskaran is survived by his wife, a son and three daughters.Baskaran will be remembered as one of the top sportsjournalists of the country. Spanning a journalistic career of several decades, he has worked with the Free Press Journal, Indian Express, Newsday(defunct) and The Times of India. Most part of his career spent at The Times ofIndia where he worked for some 25 years – before being superannuated.Besides football, he has also comprehensively reported for othergames like basketball. He has also authored a book on football, ‘Wills Book ofFootball.’The veteran journalist coveredfootball from all over the country when India was a force to reckon withinAsia. The football fans will vividly remember Baskaran not only as a journalist, but also as a pan football fan.last_img read more

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