RTD ‘Blue Buses’ Join ‘Sound The Horn’ 1 P.M. Thursday

first_imgNCRTD News:The North Central Regional Transit District RTD “Blue Buses” will be joining buses, trains and ferries nationwide at 1 p.m. Thursday, May 21 for the second #SoundTheHorn as they give two, one-second horn blasts in solidarity to honor transportation workers throughout the country. As a tribute to #HeroesMovingHeroes on the front lines of this public health crisis, buses will sound their horns in solidarity with partner agencies. Heroic transportation workers continue to provide critical service for healthcare workers, first responders, childcare workers, grocery store employees and other heroes who are performing critically essential work during the Covid-19 pandemic.The sounding of horns advances the #HeroesMovingHeroes campaign, which is dedicated to honoring transit employees. More than 150 transit systems nationwide participated in the first #SoundTheHorn campaign April 16. The campaign was first launched April 6 and features heroic frontline transportation workers who continue to go above and beyond the call of duty during this challenging time. The coalition of agencies invites Americans from across the country to participate in the day of action.last_img read more

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Tax what we burn, not what we earn

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Towards a hydrogen economy – Legislation

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Report calls for regulation on emissions in Europe

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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High cube container use is growing

first_imgThe proportion of 40 ft high-cube (9 ft 6 in high) containers in the global maritime container fleet is predicted to exceed 50 percent by the end of this year for the first time. According to Drewry’s 2013 Container Census, the equipment’s market share reached 49 percent in 2012, and is expected to grow by at least another one percent this year.The number of high cube containers in the fleet grew by another 8 0rowth last year, up to 15.4 million teu, taking the rise in demand between 2007 and 2012 up to a remarkable 49 percent. It meant that 40 ft HC’s share of the total maritime equipment market increased from 41 percent up to 49 percent, or just over one percent per annum, almost entirely at the expense of normal 40 ft 8 ft 6 in high boxes. On the other hand, the proportion of 20 ft containers remained constant at around 33 percent.The popularity of 40 ft HCs is easy to understand. Being around 13 percent larger than ordinary 40 ft boxes, shippers can load that amount of extra cargo at little to no extra freight cost. Moreover, inland transport is usually charged on a per container basis for light cargo, so there are no extra haulage costs too.Although much growth in demand for 40 ft high-cube containers has come from reefer shippers, with almost 92 percent of all refrigerated cargo being shipped in the equipment last year, it only took the sector’s volume up to 2 million teu. Dry cargo still accounted for the vast majority.Drewry says that there are two interesting messages that come of this. The first is that the need to stow 9 ft 6 in containers below deck, which results in loss of cargo space for shipping lines, is reaching a critical junction. Whereas nearly all the equipment has been stowed on deck so far, particularly reefers, this cannot continue much longer, bearing in mind that just over 50 percent of a ship’s cellular capacity is located on deck. When under-deck stowage is required, as much as 7 ft (2.1 m) can be lost between the top of the last tier of a stack and the main deck, as ship holds are usually designed for 8 ft 6 in boxes. Line of sight (from the navigating bridge) rules will also prevent more containers from being loaded on deck.The second message is that containerised cargo growth measured in teu has increasingly been underestimated over time. This is because a 40 ft HC container usually only counts as two teu, the same as 2 x 20 ft (8 ft 6 in) boxes, or  1 x 40 ft (8 ft 6 in) container, even though it is approximately 13 percent bigger.So, in a major trade lane like the eastbound transpacific, where 40 ft equipment is the norm due to light average cargo weights, although year-on-year growth in the first seven months of 2013 was only 1.856 percent measured in teu, it was over 2.2 percent measured in ‘constant’ teu. The difference may not seem much, but it makes a big difference to economists trying to make sense of the changes between GDP growth and cargo growth. It is also cumulative, so gets bigger over longer periods of time.Drewry concludes that the share of 40 ft 8 ft 6 in high containers in the global maritime fleet will continue to decline over the next 10 years, thereby increasing the need for more high-cube friendly vessels. This could include the construction of wider – and hence slower – ships with greater deck capacity.www.drewry.co.uklast_img read more

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Two of seven for Wagenborg

first_imgAs HLPFI already reported, October saw the arrival of the first ship – Zijlborg – and in the coming months Vechtdiep, Vliediep, Lingediep, Loodiep and Loenerdiep will also be delivered and given a ‘Borg-name’.Equipped with ice class 1A and three box-shaped holds of 17.5 m, 25.9 m and 25.2 m, Leuveborg is suitable for worldwide trade carrying various cargoes such as forest products, breakbulk and project freight, says Wagenborg.Leuveborg is 108.24 m in length and has a cargo capacity of 360,202 cu ft (10,199 cu m). Leuveborg (right) is currently undergoing a paint job and will soon look like the ship on the left, Zijlborg. www.wagenborg.comlast_img

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Rail-specific export credit rules introduced to encourage sustainable development

first_imgINTERNATIONAL: The Organisation for Economic Co-operation & Development has introduced sector-specific rules to govern government-backed export credits, loan guarantees and risk insurance in the rail market.The rail sector understanding which came into effect on January 1 provides tailored amendments to the credit rules followed by the 34 OECD member states, which include the EU countries, USA, Canada, Japan, South Korea and Australia. These rules are intended to ensure that purchasers make procurement decisions based on the quality of the technology and services offered, rather than on the level of state support available from suppliers’ home governments. The rail sector understanding is designed to take into account the relatively long payback times when compared to other markets, and the increasing use of PPP financing. The scope covers infrastructure including control systems, electrification, track, construction and engineering works, as well as rolling stock. OECD estimates that the market accessible to international suppliers is worth more than US$120bn/year in 2015-17. The understanding lengthens repayment terms for contracts valued at more than US$15·3m to 12 years in high-income OECD countries and up to 14 years elsewhere, with a requirement that the term must not exceed the lifetime of the assets. ‘Offering wider terms for the use of export credits in the rail sector will contribute to the creation of new railway projects, as well as the rehabilitation of existing rail infrastructure, which will reduce road traffic congestion and related carbon emissions and help countries achieve their sustainable growth objectives’, said David Drysdale, head of OECD’s export credit division.last_img read more

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Ateneo holds off Adamson in UAAP women’s volley

first_imgMadeleine Madayag of Ateneo Lady Eagles scores over Adamson Lady Falcons Bernadeth Flora. ABS-CBN SPORTS Manila – Ateneo de Manila University Lady Eagles solidified its hold on the top spot in UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball with a 25-8, 22-25, 25-16, 25-10 win over Adamson Lady Falcons on Wednesday at San Juan Arena.Pauline Gaston led the way with 16 points, on 10 attacks and six service aces, while Kat Tolentino and Bea de Leon had 15 and 14, respectively, for the Lady Eagles (5-1).Bacolodnon Kassandra Gequillana was also efficient with 24 excellent digs and 10 excellent receptions, while Deanna Wong had 29 excellent sets for Ateneo.After falling 0-4 early in the first set, the Lady Eagled unloaded a 17-1 scoring run that was halted by a Madeleine Madayag error. Ateneo went with an 8-2 run to finish the set. The Lady Falcons snatched a set from the league leaders but the Lady Eagles answered with a strong third set showing as it jumped to an early double digit edge and never looked back.The Lady Eagles took advantage of the erroneous Lady Falcons in the fourth set as it quickly opened up a huge lead en route to its fifth straight victory this season.Negrense Christine Joy Soyud tallied 13 points, while Joy Dacoron and Chiara Permentilla had nine markers each for the Lady Falcons (1-5)./PNlast_img read more

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UWF Women’s Soccer Game Notes: Week 8

first_img Share UWF Women’s Soccer Game Notes: Week 8 Marcela Franco (photo courtesy of Ron Besser) center_img PENSACOLA, Fla. – The top ranked University of West Florida women’s soccer team will hit the road this weekend for two crucial conference matches. On Friday afternoon the women will take on Alabama-Huntsville at noon and before squaring off with Delta State on Sunday afternoon. COMPLETE GAME NOTES.Notes and Program PagePrint Friendly Versionlast_img

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