In Craven County

first_imgSituated along the Atlantic Ocean, the coastal plains of Craven County are an ideal location for raising a family or a relaxing getaway. Many people traveling in the area choose to drive, enjoying the ocean views and forest backdrop of the Croatan National Forest.For those flying, there are four airports within about two hours’ drive with numerous air carriers to choose from. One airport is right in New Bern but offers limited service, but a major airport is 150 miles away with numerous options for travelers.The county has public transportation, and the area is also served by a Greyhound Station.AIRPORTSAlbert J. Ellis Airport264 Albert Ellis Airport RoadRichlands, NC 28574 910-324-1100www.flyoaj.comAlbert J. Ellis Airport is near Jacksonville and about 55 miles from MCAS Cherry Point. The airport serves residents in the coastal region in places such as Morehead City, Surf City and throughout Onslow County and eastern North Carolina. American Airlines and Delta Air Lines offer daily flights to and from Charlotte and Atlanta.Ground transportation includes taxi, hotel shuttle and rental car service. Five rental car companies offer services to travelers at the airport: Avis, Budget, Enterprise, Hertz and National-Alamo.Coastal Carolina Regional Airport200 Terminal DriveNew Bern, NC 28562 252-638-8591www.newbernairport.comLocated in New Bern, less than a block from U.S. Highway 70, the airport offers as many as 10 flights daily, including regional jet service, with shorter lines and parking just a few steps away from the terminal. American Airlines and Delta Air Lines offer frequent flights to and from East Coast hub airports.Ground transportation includes taxi, hotel shuttle and rental car service. Five rental car companies offer services to travelers at the airport: Avis, Budget, Enterprise, Hertz and National-Alamo.Raleigh-Durham International Airport2400 John Brantley Blvd.Morrisville, NC 27560 919-840-2123www.rdu.comRaleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU) is about 150 miles from MCAS Cherry Point and is served by nine major carriers: Air Canada, Alaska Airlines, Allegiant Air, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Frontier Airlines, JetBlue Airways, Southwest Airlines and United Airlines. Travelers can choose from more than 40 nonstop destinations on one of 400 daily flights from RDU.Ground transportation includes 11 rental car companies, Greyhound, Amtrak, a regional bus service, a number of shared transportation options, and taxi and limo services.Wilmington International Airport1740 Airport Blvd., Suite 12Wilmington, NC 28405 910-341-4125www.flyilm.comWilmington International Airport is about 95 miles from MCAS Cherry Point and has two major carriers, American Airlines and Delta Air Lines, with nonstop service to Atlanta, Charlotte, New York City, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. Ground transportation includes eight rental car services, and taxi and limo services.PUBLIC TRANSPORTATIONCraven Area Rural Transit System (CARTS)2822 Neuse Blvd.New Bern, NC 28562 252-636-4917www.cravencountync.gov/departments/trn.cfmCARTS serves Craven, Jones and Pamlico counties. The system operates a fleet of 32 vehicles, including specially modified vans to accommodate the elderly and/or handicapped and a variety of other vehicles such as standard vans, converted vans, mini-buses and sedans. The service operates from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday.For more information on fares and the system’s service area, visit the website.New Bern Greyhound Station4010 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.New Bern, NC 28562 252-633-3100Toll Free 800-231-2222www.greyhound.comGreyhound provides bus service between several points in North Carolina and across the United States. Call for hours of operation and ticketing schedules, or book online.last_img read more

Read more

Big The Musical Will ‘Cross the Line’ to London’s West End

first_img View Comments Jay McGuiness as Josh Baskin in production art for “Big”(Photo: Matt Crockett) It’s time! Big, the celebrated 1996 Broadway musical based on the 1988 film, will make its long overdue West End premiere at the Dominion Theatre this fall. Morgan Young will direct and choreograph the production, a transfer from the 2016 Theatre Royal Plymouth staging, set to play a limited nine-week run from September 6 through November 2. Jay McGuiness will repeat his acclaimed performance as Josh Baskin.Big centers on 12-year-old Josh, who wants nothing more than to be big. When a mysterious Zoltar machine grants his wish, he finds himself trapped inside an adult’s body as he is forced to live and work in a grown-up world. He is surprised when his childlike innocence has a transforming effect on the adults he encounters.Big features a Tony-nominated book by John Weidman and a Tony-nominated score by David Shire (music) and Richard Maltby (lyrics). The West End production will feature musical supervision by Stuart Morley, with set and costume design by Simon Higlett, lighting design by Tim Lutkin, video design by Ian Galloway and sound design by Terry Jardine and Avgoustos Psillas.Additional casting will be announced soon.last_img read more

Read more

DVHA increases Medicaid reimbursement for primary care physicians

first_imgVermont Business Magazine Yesterday, the Department of Vermont Health Access (DVHA) submitted a report to the Health Reform Oversight and Joint Fiscal committees detailing DVHA’s increased Medicaid payments for the Enhanced Primacy Care Program (EPCP). The new payment structure results in a net increase of approximately 8.9 percent to eligible primary care providers.This spring, the Vermont legislature and Shumlin Administration collaborated on Act 172 which directed DVHA to use up to $4 million of funds appropriated to the Department for State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2017 to increase EPCP payments. These payments had temporarily been increased after the passage of the federal Affordable Care Act. The goal of the legislation was to restore the payments to a level closer to what had been in effect under the expired federal program.DVHA increased baseline reimbursement rates by $4 million for Evaluation and Management (E&M) and Vaccine Administration services provided by eligible primary care physicians. These reimbursement changes effectively reallocate $4 million previously paid to academic medical centers for Medicaid covered services and increased payments for specific primary care services by the same amount. The payment structure became effective October 1, 2016 and has no net impact on DVHA’s budget.2016 EPCP increases During the 2016 Legislative Session, Act 172, Section E.306.13(a) required DVHA to use up to $4 million of funds appropriated to the Department for State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2017 to increase EPCP payments effective October 1, 2016. The intent was to further restore the enhanced payments to eligible primary care providers to a level closer to what had been in effect prior to the expiration of the federal EPCP program funded through the ACA. DVHA increased baseline reimbursement rates by $4 million for E&M and Vaccine Administration services provided by eligible primary care physicians. This appropriation of additional funds resulted in an increase of approximately 8.9% and became effective October 1, 2016 as shown below.A public notice was posted in the Vermont Global Commitment Register and in the Burlington Free Press Newspaper on August 31, 2016. The public comment period was open for 30 days. The increase to primary care reimbursements for enhanced payments must be submitted to CMS as an amendment to the Medicaid State Plan (known as a SPA). The SPA must be submitted to CMS by December 31, 2016; approval and match of federal funds will be retrospective back to October 1, 2016.Reduction to Academic Medical Center Rates In order to be able to manage within its appropriated budget for SFY 2017, DVHA was also authorized in Act 172, Section E.306.13(b) to offset the October 1, 2016 increase to EPCP reimbursement rates by adjusting downwards the reimbursement rates paid to Academic Medical Centers for inpatient, outpatient or professional services. This rate adjustment was effective on October 1, 2016.Methodology DVHA modeled various alternatives and approaches to reduce reimbursements to academic medical centers. As a result of this work, DVHA determined that the most appropriate and equitable approach was to reduce inpatient hospital rates, effective October 1, 2016. Having decided this, DVHA then developed an approach for allocating the reduction of $4 million to the impacted academic medical centers. This was accomplished by comparing and analyzing current inpatient payment amounts to the University of Vermont Medical Center (UVMMC), Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC) and other Out of State (OOS) Academic Medical Centers, and apportioning the total reductions to each.With the targeted reduction amounts known, DVHA then addressed the method within the inpatient rate methodology to reduce the $4 million in payments. Two elements of the methodology were chosen: (a) First, a provision in the inpatient reimbursement methodology that made an additional per diem payment above the case rate for neonatal cases was eliminated. Most of these payments had been made to UVMMC and DMHC. Other OOS academic medical centers were not eligible for the payment. The elimination of these payments resulted in a reduction of payments to academic medical centers of approximately $2 million. (b)The remaining $2 million reduction was made by reducing the per case payment amount to the academic medical centers. This was accomplished by reducing what is known as the hospital’s base rate.A public notice was posted in the Vermont Global Commitment Register and in the Burlington Free Press Newspaper on September 8, 2016. The changes to inpatient hospital rates which include the elimination of neonate add-on payments and reductions to base rates for academic medical centers to offset the increase to EPCP rates will be submitted to CMS as SPA. Consistent with the changes to the EPCP payments, the SPA must be submitted to CMS by December 31, 2016; approval and match of federal funds will be retrospective back to October 1, 2016.SUMMARY As described above in detail and pursuant to Act 172, Section E.306.13, DVHA implemented provider reimbursement changes effective October 1, 2016 that have the effect of reallocating approximately $4 million previously paid to academic medical centers for Medicaid covered services and increased payments for specific primary care services by the same amount. The net result to DVHA SFY 17 budget is $0.Source: DVHA 11.1.2016last_img read more

Read more

Watch for Me-VT: Sharing the road essential to safe communities

first_imgVermont Business Magazine New data released from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) show that despite an overall decrease in fatal vehicular crashes, the number of people killed while walking and biking has increased – a trend that Vermont health and transportation officials want thrown into reverse.6,283 pedestrians were killed in the U.S. during 2018 while walking – the highest number since 1990. In Vermont, nine pedestrians were struck and killed while walking along roads in 2017, and 133 pedestrians and 179 bicyclists were hospitalized or went to an emergency department after a crash involving a vehicle.While biking accidents are most prevalent in the northwestern part of the state in Chittenden, Addison and Franklin counties, pedestrian injuries don’t have such a clear a pattern.While Chittenden has the most pedestrian injuries and is the most populous county, far-smaller Washington is a close second and Bennington isn’t far behind in third. Rutland County, with the second largest city, has the second lowest injury rate.Demographically, the same profile emerges. There is no clear age or gender pattern to pedestrian injuries, but biking accidents are more prevalent among young riders and males. Riders under 15 are the largest cohort.BikingPedestrianBikingPedestrian “Factors such as speed, inattention and impairment among drivers can be fatal for pedestrians and cyclists,” said Megan Rigoni, pedestrian safety coordinator with the Vermont Department of Health. The actual number of injuries is likely higher, as near misses and crashes where people do not seek medical care are not captured in the data.Vermonters see walking and biking as healthy ways to get around, and some people rely on them as their only form of transportation. Yet nearly 10% of adults said they felt their community was not at all safe, or only slightly safe, for walking.To help bend the curve, the Health Department and Agency of Transportation have launched Watch for Me-VT(link is external), a public outreach campaign designed to raise awareness of road safety issues, and to promote multidisciplinary partnerships that assist communities in developing policies and infrastructure changes that support road user safety.Road safety can be improved through a combination of factors, including design and engineering. Under the state’s Complete Streets(link is external) policy, municipalities must consider the needs of all roadway users.Community design that promotes road user safety, and programs such as Safe Routes to School(link is external)(link is external), helps reduce the number of injuries. These efforts also improve public health through increased physical activity and reduced environmental impacts. In addition, communities can enjoy the economic benefits of being great places to visit, live, work and raise a family.Drivers are urged to take steps to protect themselves and others on the road. A key factor is reducing vehicle speed. “As drivers, we often forget we are behind the wheel of a massive machine that in an instant can become a deadly weapon,” said Rigoni. “A person driving at a slower speed has more time to react, and a crash is less likely to result in serious injury or death.”Rigoni said that everyone should take steps to protect themselves, especially young people. “Nearly a third of middle school students report rarely or never wearing a bike helmet,” said Rigoni. “Head injuries are life-altering. Make sure your kids wear a helmet,” Rigoni said, encouraging adults to set the example and model best safety practices.Tips for Drivers:Slow down. Reduced speed can save a life.Stay alert and share the road. Take breaks as needed. Practice patience.Avoid distracted driving. Never text and drive.Never drive under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Just don’t.Tips for Pedestrians and Bikers:Be bright at night. People riding bikes are required to have lights. Use reflective gear – stick reflective tape on your shoes, jacket, backpack or walker, and use a flashlight when walking outside in the dark.Be predictable. Make eye contact to signal to drivers your intent to cross the street. Use hand signals if you are biking.Dress to protect. Wear your bike helmet. Walkers should wear shoes with good traction to prevent falls, especially on icy ground.Walk on sidewalks or facing traffic if there are none.Bike with the flow of traffic. Use and promote bike lanes.Learn more about staying safe on the road, visit Watch For Me−VT: safestreets.vermont.gov/WatchForMe(link is external)(link is external)Vermont Injury Data: healthvermont.gov/health-statistics-vital-records/surveillance-reporting-topic/injuries(link is external)Source: BURLINGTON, Vt – Vermont Department of Health healthvermont.gov(link is external)last_img read more

Read more

At 2014 KU Kickoff, Weis says team is ‘sick and tired’ of national perspective on Jayhawks

first_imgThe KU cheerleaders pumped up the crowd before members of the athletics department got on stage.Brutal heat and a 3-9 2013 football record may have kept the crowd at Friday’s ninth annual KU Kickoff at Corinth Square smaller than in some previous years, but for devoted Jayhawks fans, the event provided a chance to mingle with other northeast Johnson County alums and get a fresh dose of Jayhawk spirit.[pullquote]Charlie Weis on the crowds at Corinth SquareKU football coach Charlie Weis says he was blown away the first time he came to the KU Kickoff and saw the thousands of fans assembled at Corinth Square.Audio Playerhttps://dfv6pkw99pxmo.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/New-Recording-23.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.[/pullquote]Women’s basketball coach Bonnie Henrickson stole the show at the close of her remarks by channelling her basketball program counterpart. Noting the absence of Bill Self — who tends to be among the biggest draws to the pep rally — at this year’s event, Henrickson asked for 30 extra seconds behind the microphone to try to show the crowd what they were missing. “We’re not real good yet,” she said trying on Self’s unaffected delivery. “But, uh, uh, we could be good.” The imitation drew huge laughter and applause from the audience.Third year football head coach Charlie Weis decided to forego standing on the event stage, choosing instead to stand a couple of feet below among the KU band and cheerleaders for his remarks. Weis mostly avoided talking about specific players (the Jayhawks have just lost their two top running backs to injuries), with the exception of Bishop Miege grad Montel Cozart, who had been tapped as this year’s starting quarterback. Weis acknowledged the struggles of the past two seasons, but said he felt he finally had enough of his own players in house to make the team competitive.“I’m speaking on behalf of our team tonight, that we’re sick and tired of the national perspective of KU football, being that we’re not worth a crap,” Weis said. “We’re sick and tired of it. But let me tell you something. Until you do something about it, that’s what the perspective is going to be.”The Jayhawks open their season at home against Southeast Missouri State Sept. 6.Charlie Weis told the crowd his team “expects to play in December.”Brutal heat had many in the crowd struggling to keep cool.Bonnie Henrickson stole the show with her imitation of KU men’s basketball coach Bill Self.last_img read more

Read more

PBS will broadcast documentary on dying featuring Prairie Village surgeon who built his own coffin

first_imgJeffrey Piehler, who died in 2014, is featured in the new film.PBS has announced is will have a national broadcast of a new documentary exploring attitudes toward death and dying that prominently features a Prairie Village surgeon who died of prostate cancer in 2014.Jeffrey Piehler, MD, generated a national discussion about end of life issues when he published an essay in the New York Times in February 2014 regarding his decision to build his own coffin. Piehler had been diagnosed with cancer in 2002, and retired from practice in 2005 as symptoms from the disease and side-effects from treatment hampered his ability to perform surgery. He passed away in November 2014.The new documentary, from producer Helen Whitney, is called Into the Night: Portraits of Life and Death, and features interviews with nine people exploring the existential questions people face when they encounter the unavoidable onset of illness, old age and death.“Yet very few of us are comfortable talking about it, even thinking about it,” Whitney said of the documentary’s subject.In the film, Piehler talks about how he found comfort in the friendship he developed with Peter Warren, the artist and woodworker who aided him in construction of his coffin.The national broadcast of the film, which is narrated by Sharon Stone, will be Monday, March 26 at 8 p.m.The trailer for the film is below:Into the Night- Portraits of Life and Death — a film by Helen Whitney (trailer) from INTO THE NIGHT – a documentary on Vimeo.last_img read more

Read more

Coleman, Kowalski receive Bar Foundation President’s Award

first_imgColeman, Kowalski receive Bar Foundation President’s Award PAST FLORIDA BAR FOUNDATION President John Patterson presents Jacksonville Area Legal Aid Executive Director James A. Kowalski, Jr., and past Florida Bar President Gregory W. Coleman with the Foundation’s 2016 President’s Award for Excellence on behalf of his firm Shutts & Bowen, which sponsored the award.Coleman, Kowalski receive Bar Foundation President’s Award Special to the News Florida Bar past President Gregory W. Coleman and Jacksonville Area Legal Aid Executive Director James A. Kowalski, Jr., received The Florida Bar Foundation’s 2016 President’s Award for Excellence at the Foundation’s 40th Annual Reception and Dinner in Orlando. Foundation President Donny MacKenzie, who has served with both recipients on the Florida Commission on Access to Civil Justice, selected Coleman and Kowalski for the award because their strong leadership and their will to do good made them stand out. “It was an honor serving with these two extraordinary leaders on the Florida Commission on Access to Civil Justice. In my view, they represent the brightest and the best the legal profession has to offer in terms of their knowledge, wisdom, and commitment to our system of justice,” MacKenzie said. “In my humble opinion, The Florida Bar Foundation, the commission, and indeed our legal profession are better off because of these two fine people.” Past Florida Bar Foundation President John Patterson presented the awards. “They are helping bring to fruition one of the signature projects launched through the commission: an online gateway that will connect users statewide to the legal resources best suited to meet their needs,” Patterson said. “They are helping drive the change that will put Florida at the forefront of legal services technology.” Coleman helped found the Florida Commission on Access to Civil Justice, established by administrative order of Florida Chief Justice Jorge Labarga in November 2014, and serves on the boards of The Florida Bar Foundation and the Florida Justice Technology Center and as a member of the ABA House of Delegates. Kowalski is on the Florida Courts Technology Commission and has served for two years as president of the Project Directors Association for Florida’s civil legal aid programs. A two-time recipient of The Florida Bar President’s Pro Bono Service Award, Kowalski was named “Consumer Protection Lawyer of the Year” by The Florida Bar in 2011. He left private practice to become executive director of Jacksonville Area Legal Aid in 2012. Jennifer Etienne is an intern from the University of Central Florida’s Nicholson School of Communication assigned to The Florida Bar Foundation. August 1, 2016 Jennifer Etienne Regular Newslast_img read more

Read more

Gophers open up Big Ten slate with sweep

first_imgGophers open up Big Ten slate with sweepThe team improved to 27-4 this season with this weekend’s victories at Illinois. Matt GreensteinMarch 23, 2015Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintWith a sweep of Illinois over the weekend, Minnesota set a program record for most consecutive wins.Stretching back to the beginning of March, the Gophers have won their last 13 games.Much of their success has been due to the offensive outburst provided throughout the lineup. Two of the Gophers’ three victories against Illinois ended early due to Minnesota reaching the run rule.“You can’t count on scoring eight runs every game. We’re getting a lot of runs up and down the lineup right now,” head coach Jessica Allister said.Minnesota scored 28 total runs in the three-game series, including a 14-2 victory Friday.Senior Tyler Walker was one of a few hitters who led the offensive barrage.She ended the weekend 5-for-11 and helped give the Gophers pitchers added offensive support with six runs batted in.“We like to say we manufacture our runs. If somebody gets on with a walk or a hit, we want to be able to move them around and bring them in,” Walker said.Sophomore pitcher Sara Groenewegen started all three games, earning the victory in two.She also gave herself run support throughout the series, driving in six runs on five hits.Minnesota’s offense took pressure off its pitching. The Gophers pitchers gave up five runs during the weekend on just 13 hits.“[Run support] allows me to free things up. It’s always nice having that cushion. You’re able to throw the pitches you need to work on. It’s definitely a good thing,” Groenewegen said.Minnesota’s offensive dominance was present in its first two games, but it lacked the big bats in its third game.The Gophers ended with three hits in the 3-2 victory, and all of their runs came from the three errors Illinois committed.Minnesota has had troubles stranding runners this season.Despite prolific offense outburst, the Gophers left 18 runners on base throughout the weekend.“We did well with the long ball this week,” Walker said. “It’s honestly just hitting ground balls and being able to run and score from first.”During the winning streak, Minnesota’s offense has been rolling.In nine of their 13 victories during the span, the Gophers have tallied more than eight runs.“We talk about in games just slamming the door. By that, we mean as long as there’s an out left for the other team, that gives them hope to come back. We want to continue to slam the door on defense and keep putting runs up offensively,” Walker said.last_img read more

Read more

News Scan for Nov 19, 2014

first_imgMERS claims 2 more lives in Saudi Arabia, 1 in a new caseThe death from MERS-CoV of a 99-year-old Saudi Arabian man whose case had not been reported before plus the death of a woman whose case was reported yesterday bring that country’s total case count since June 2012 to 807, with 345 deaths, according to an update today from the Saudi Ministry of Health (MOH).The new case-patient was from the city of Al-Kharj. He had preexisting disease and was symptomatic. Although he had no reported contact with known MERS-CoV (Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus) patients, he did have exposure to animals, a possible risk factor, though no details are given.The second death from MERS-CoV in the past day was in an 84-year-old woman, also in the city of Al-Kharj. She was not a healthcare worker and had no exposure to animals, but she did have preexisting disease.The MOH also lists the recovery from MERS-CoV of a 45-year-old female expatriate in Riyadh. She is not a healthcare worker but did have preexisting disease at presentation. Her recovery leaves 12 active cases currently in Saudi Arabia.Nov 19 MOH update Nov 18 CIDRAP News scan  Pfizer says group B meningococcal vaccine availablePfizer’s Trumenba vaccine, the first meningococcal serogroup B vaccine approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is available for order, the company said yesterday in a news release.The vaccine is available for healthcare providers, pharmacies, medical centers, and college health centers for people 10 to 24 years old, Pfizer said. About 30% of meningococcal disease in that age-group is caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B, and about 10% of those cases prove fatal, the company said. Several US campuses reported group B outbreaks last year, and in response the FDA allowed use of the Novartis vaccine Bexsero under an investigational new drug designation.The FDA approved Trumenba on Oct 29. It can be ordered by calling Pfizer customer service at 1-800-666-7248.Nov 18 Pfizer news release Oct 29 CIDRAP News scan on FDA approval FSIS puts price of expanding non-O157 STEC testing at $1 millionThe US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has determined that expanding its non-O157 Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) testing to include ground beef and ground beef components other than beef manufacturing trimmings will cost about $1 million, according to a Federal Register notice today.The FSIS also responded to comments on a previous cost- benefit analysis. The new report will be open for comments until Jan 20, 2015.The cost for current non-O157 testing of beef trimmings is about $1.37 million, which includes USDA and industry costs, the FSIS said. Expansion to include testing of bench trim, raw ground beef, and “other components” would add $1 million. Of the $2.37 million total cost, all but about $1 million would be incurred by the FSIS.The agency added, “FSIS has concluded that the benefits accruing to industry, Government, and consumers from this new testing policy will result in net economic benefits. However, FSIS was not able to quantify the benefits of expanding the testing.”Nov 19 Federal Register notice WHO reports global progress, challenges in water sanitationMore than 80% of countries have inadequate funding to develop and maintain adequate water sanitation systems, according to a World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations-Water (UN-Water) report released today.The WHO and UN-Water report surveyed strengths and barriers to water sanitation and hygiene in 94 countries and 23 external support agencies. More than 80% of countries had made sanitation a priority in national legislation, and more than 70% had implemented measures to increase drinking-water access for low-income people.Approximately 2.5 billion people globally do not have access to basic sanitation, and 748 million people cannot easily travel to clean drinking water. The WHO found that challenges to improving water systems and access include lack of funding in more than 80% of countries and low capacity to develop sanitation systems or monitor them for hygiene issues.Areas in which funding for sanitation and potable water sources is urgently needed include rural regions, which receive only 10% of national financing, and institutions such as schools and clinics, the report said.International aid to develop clean water systems rose by 30%, to $10.9 billion, from 2010 to 2012. The WHO reports a fourfold return on investment in sanitation aid due to prevention of diarrheal and parasitic diseases.Nov 19 WHO reportlast_img read more

Read more

Dutch court orders government to cut GHG emissions

first_imgThe Hague District Court has ruled that the Netherlands must take more action to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions in the country.The judge ordered the Dutch government to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by at least 25 percent by 2020 from benchmark 1990 levels.The case was brought to court by Urgenda Foundation, a citizens’ platform which develops plans and measures to prevent climate change.The foundation also represents 886 individuals in this case.Based on the country’s current policy, the Netherlands will achieve a reduction of 17 percent at most in 2020, which is below the norm of 25 percent to 40 percent for developed countries deemed necessary in climate science and international climate policy, according to de Rechtspraak, the Netherlands Judiciary website.“The State (the Netherlands) must do more to avert the imminent danger caused by climate change, also in view of its duty of care to protect and improve the living environment.“The State is responsible for effectively controlling the Dutch emission levels. Moreover, the costs of the measures ordered by the court are not unacceptably high.“Therefore, the State should not hide behind the argument that the solution to the global climate problem does not depend solely on Dutch efforts. Any reduction of emissions contributes to the prevention of dangerous climate change and as a developed country the Netherlands should take the lead in this,” it is stated on de Rechtspraak website, in connection with the ruling.This is the first time that a judge has legally required a state to take precautions against climate change, Urgenda’s press release reads.Marjan Minnesma, who in 2013 initiated this case against the Netherlands, said: “All the plaintiffs are overjoyed by the result. This makes it crystal clear that climate change is a huge problem that needs to be dealt with much more effectively, and that states can no longer afford inaction. States are meant to protect their citizens, and if politicians will not do this of their own accord, then the courts are there to help.”The Dutch Urgenda Foundation aims for a fast transition towards a sustainable society, with a focus on the transition towards a circular economy using only renewable energy.Image: Urgenda/Chantal Bekkerlast_img read more

Read more