Junior Class Council hosts Domecoming activities

first_imgThis year’s annual Domecoming Week, hosted by Junior Class Council (JCC) will be “fun for a cause,” junior class president Kevin Doherty said. Monday’s Domecoming kickball game, Kick for Kans, launched a weeklong food drive sponsored by the junior class. Students who donated a non-perishable food item could play the game on North Quad. “We thought that giving back to the community would be a good way to give Domecoming a new dimension of ‘fun for a cause’ that would attract more interest from the student body and the local community,” Doherty said. “We will have collection boxes available at all of the events this week.” Doherty said the week offers a chance to bring the junior class and other members of the student body together. “Its purpose is to unite students in a week of fun events and activities on campus,” Doherty said. “Our hope is that Domecoming will continue to grow and involve more student groups, and be carried on as a tradition for years to come.” The junior class will also sell Class of 2013 “bro tanks” throughout the week. Doherty said an initial order of the tanks sold out almost immediately. “We sold out within a few hours during our first sale in the dining halls,” Doherty said. “We ordered a little over 200 new tanks and are hoping these will sell out over the course of the week.” JCC representative Kelsey Eckenrode said Domecoming is Notre Dame’s version of homecoming at other schools. “We wanted to give the students something similar,” Eckenrode said. “We were surprised that a big football school like Notre Dame didn’t already have homecoming.” The junior class will also host song-led adoration service at 9 p.m. Tuesday in the Ryan Hall Chapel. “The song-led adoration should be a really awesome event for people to relax, reflect and listen to some great music,” Eckenrode said. “The JCC is really excited for all of the events this week.” Juniors can skate for free on the JACC ice rink Wednesday from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., and Doherty said students could still register for a Thursday dodge ball tournament online or at the event. “The winning teams will be awarded Chipotle gift cards and bragging rights,” Doherty said. The second annual Domecoming Dance on Friday will end the week with music and dancing under a tent on South Quad, as well as free food from Chick-fil-A, Eckenrode said. “We’re happy that the dance is outdoors this year since the weather is supposed to be great on Friday,” Eckenrode said. The junior class will host all the Domecoming events this week, Doherty said, but the activities are open to all students. “While the focus is on the junior class, we welcome all students to our events this week,” he said. “The only exception is the Domecoming Dance, which SAO classifies as a junior class dance, but non-juniors are welcome to attend as long as they accompany a junior. Our goal is to involve as many students on campus as possible in Domecoming Week.” Further information about Domecoming events can be found on the Domecoming 2011 Facebook page.last_img read more

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Analyst highlights persecution

first_imgChristians are the most persecuted religious group in the world today, according to the International Society for Human Rights, which says 80 percent of all religious acts of discrimination target Christians. In his talk Monday night titled “The Global War on Christians,” CNN’s senior Vatican analyst John Allen highlighted countries experiencing heavy persecution of Christians today and debunked myths about such conflicts while arguing that the American Church can take a bigger role in addressing these heinous acts. Allen’s address was the second keynote address of the “Seed of the Church” conference on Christian martyrs. “We are talking in my opinion about the most dramatic, most compelling, most urgent Christian narrative of our time,” Allen said. Allen said according to the Pew Forum, persecution of Christians occurs in 133 countries. According to Aid to the Church in Need, about 150,000 Christians have been killed in religious conflict each year of the 21st century. “In the hour that we are going to be together tonight, somewhere on this planet, 11 Christians are losing their lives,” Allen said. “This number is not only astonishing but obscene.” One place Allen described as an epicenter of Christian persecution is Iraq. Even though this region was an integral part of the early Church, Iraq’s Christian population has shrunk from between one and a half and two million in 1991 to fewer than 450,000 today, Allen said. “A Church that took two millennia to construct has been gutted essentially in two decades,” he said. Since American intervention in Iraq has exacerbated sectarian tensions, putting Christians at greater risk for persecution, Allen said the American Church has an obligation to assist Iraqi Christians. “Given what we profess as Catholics and given the responsibility we bear as Americans, the fact that the situation facing the Church in Iraq is not a … top-of-the-brain concern for the Catholic Church in the United States is nothing less than a moral scandal,” he said. “Our failure to apply our last best efforts to meaningful gestures of solidarity with our brothers and sisters in Iraq is quite simply inexcusable.” Allen said most people falsely believe Christian persecution can only come from regions where Muslim extremism is prevalent. “If somehow tomorrow, radical Islam were to disappear, the threats to Christians would hardly be gone,” he said. “What we face is a bewildering cocktail of threats.” Some threatening groups include radical Hindus in India, nationalists in Turkey and even radical Christians, Allen said. Christians can also be persecuted in countries such as Mexico where they are the overwhelming religious majority, he said. Another myth about Christian persecution is it is a political issue, Allen said. “If we are going to take a clear-eyed look at the global war on Christians, we cannot try to see it through the funhouse mirror of secular politics,” he said. Most of all, Allen said Americans can support persecuted Christians abroad merely by being mindful of their situation. When he interviewed Christian Syrian refugees in Lebanon during Pope Benedict XVI’s visit to Beirut, Allen said they all agreed on how Western Christians could help them. “Do you want to know the number one must popular answer by far they gave me that they said would make the most tangible and appreciable difference to them?” he said. “The answer was, ‘Don’t forget about us.’ … You and I cannot solve the problems of the world. We can’t make the violence in Syria go away tomorrow, but we can try to find creative ways to broadcast the message that we have not forgotten them and that we are paying attention.” Contact Tori Roeck at vroeck@nd.edulast_img read more

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Event promotes safe driving

first_img “Women’s Health brought the idea to SGA, and we felt that it was a great idea,” she said. “We think the texting while driving simulation is especially worthwhile because it is something that is gaining more attention across the country.” According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, more than 3,000 people were killed as a result of drivers sending text messages while behind the wheel in 2010. In the same year, more than 10,000 people were killed due to drivers getting behind the wheel while under the influence of alcohol, the equivalent of one crash every 51 minutes. These statistics lead Women’s Health and Parsons to bring “Arrive Alive” to campus. Parsons said that while there is no set speaker or planned discussion, students are able to stop by the “Arrive Alive” at any point during the afternoon to participate in the simulator, ask questions or get more information about UNITE. She expects students to gain a new level of respect for the importance of not taking part in risky driving behaviors and the simulator is an effective way to help spread this message. “[SGA] hopes that students learn of the consequences that can come from drinking and driving as well as texting while driving,” she said. “I think anytime you allow students to physically participate in something, the message is better understood.” “I think texting while driving is especially important for students to understand the consequences of because it is a more recent problem with the increase in technology over the last decade,” senior student body president Maureen Parsons said. “People are now tweeting, using Facebook and emailing while driving. It is important for students to understand what can happen and the risks of texting and driving. Students, faculty and staff will have the opportunity to experience distracted driving firsthand at the “Arrive Alive” present Tuesday at the Student Center atrium. “Arrive Alive” will take place Tuesday from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Student Center atrium. The event, co-sponsored by the Student Government Association (SGA) and Women’s Health, Saint Mary’s health services center, is intended to increase awareness about drunk driving and texting while driving. “With the simulation, student will be able to truly experience what it feels like and what can happen drinking and driving or texting while driving,” Parsons said. The event will feature a car simulation to help participants to get an idea of what it is physically like to drive while drunk or texting. “As college students, it is always important to remind students of the dangers of drinking and driving.” The presenting company, UNITE, is a top health and wellness organization in the country. UNITE visits schools and universities to educate students of all ages across the nation about the risks of distracted driving. Parsons said she is thankful to Women’s Health for bringing the concept to SGA’s attention.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s names Outstanding Senior

first_imgGraduates of the College will receive their diplomas Saturday, but this year’s Outstanding Senior Eleanor Jones said she has already earned the most valuable gift possible — a Saint Mary’s education.Jones, a global studies major, said she was surprised to learn that her leadership, service and academic achievement qualified her for this award.“It was really unexpected just because I know how many people in our class are so passionate about what they do,” she said. “We’ve got a great student body with a lot of people who do different activities across the board, so honestly I wasn’t expecting it because we have so many incredible people. Knowing that makes it an even bigger honor.”Jones said her involvement with the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership enhanced her college experience by encouraging her to appreciate other lifestyles while recognizing a common humanity.“There are universal issues that we can all revolve around,” Jones said. “You get to realize more of your similarities and your differences and how you can celebrate them.”Jones said she spent two summers at Saint Mary’s working for the Study of the United States Institute (SUSI), where women from North Africa and the Middle East develop action plans they want to implement in their home countries. Through her work with SUSI, as well as her year-long study abroad experience in South Africa, Jones said she learned the importance of intercultural leadership and sensitivity. In 2014, the Jordanian team proposed a company called SheCab, in which all passengers and drivers are female.“I got to go to Jordan to give them moral support, and we went to the embassy with them when they presented their business plan,” Jones said. “We decided we wanted to start a fundraiser on campus to show that Saint Mary’s still supported them even though they weren’t here anymore.”Marc Belanger, Global Studies professor, said in an email Jones’s desire to understand and improve the world around her is evident in her superior work.“As a student, [Jones] has first rate writing and analytic skills comparable to other outstanding students, but what makes her different is that [Jones] really cares about the human dimension of the issues we are discussing and asks questions that always push the discussion to a deeper level than it might normally go,” Belanger said. “While her GPA shows that she gets A’s most of the time, it is this level of what I would call ethical seriousness that makes her so interesting to work with.”According to Belanger, Jones’s desire to respond to global challenges makes her deserving of the Outstanding Senior Award.“I don’t think I have ever had a student any more determined to figure out the best way for her to make a difference in the world or more willing to question her own motives and goals with more honesty,” Belanger said. “I think she can do that because she never forgets that it’s not about theories or ideologies, but about human beings.”Jones said the support of Belanger, along with other faculty and staff, enables her to be her best self.“Most of the things I’ve done are because a professor has tapped me on the shoulder and said ‘Hey, I think this would be a good idea,’” she said. “Saint Mary’s has kept pushing me to get outside my comfort zone. I feel like I’m always presented with different opportunities, and it’s been hard for me to say no.”Jones said one of her most meaningful accomplishments is helping to pioneer the Food Recovery Program, which donates leftovers from the dining hall to the Center for the Homeless.“We’ve saved about 5,100 pounds since last year,” Jones said. “You can see the initial impact of everything that you’ve done.”Though Jones has contributed to the community, she said her classmates’ success is most impressive to her.“I think that we have a lot of students who found what they are passionate about and have started applying it,” Jones said. “We’ve got a well-rounded student body.”Jones will return to South Africa for a year of service at a children’s home. She said students should view every challenge as a path to success and make the most of their college years.Jones said Saint Mary’s shapes its students into goal-oriented, compassionate leaders capable of changing the world.“In a world where women are often times pitted against each other, here we’ve got this community of people constantly trying to support each other,” Jones said. “It has taught me to be strong and confident in what I say, and I think that’s pretty special.”Tags: Commencement 2016, Outstanding senior award, saint mary’slast_img read more

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Students react to vice presidential debate

first_imgA little more than one week after Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump sparred in the first presidential debate of the 2016 election, their respective running mates, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, faced off in their only debate of the election cycle at Longwood University in Virginia Tuesday night.ND Votes hosted a watch party for the debate in the LaFortune Ballroom for students to discuss the issues the candidates addressed. Over the course of the night, Kaine and Pence were tasked with issues relating to the trustworthiness of their respective running mates, national security, economic development and matters of faith.Junior Shane Jenkins said that the two candidates differed in their demeanor when answering questions.“Tim Kaine … had certain parts prepared [with] full arguments and stories that he prepared before,” Jenkins said. “He liked to interrupt and was very excited. Pence seemed to be more reserved and seemed to be doing a better job than Trump in the previous debate.”Junior Louie Filipiak noted that the candidates seemed to have a difficult time addressing each other’s points of view because they have fundamentally different views of America.“Several times Kaine would interrupt because Pence was forming his own reality based on conservatism, while at the same time, when Kaine would speak, Pence would just shake his head,” Filipiak said, “They’re forming their own views of what America is like and almost seemed to think that the other’s was not a true reality.”Both Filipiak and Jenkins believed that this distinction was evident in how the two candidates used certain terms.“One example is ‘business,’ [with a] positive connotation for Pence and a negative connotation for Kaine,” Filipiak said. Filipiak said that this debate appeared to be different in tone from Clinton and Trump’s debate. “I think that this debate was a lot more respectful because it was an exchange of ideas,” Filipiak said.It seemed hard at times for Pence to distance himself from Donald Trump and his views, Filipiak said.“The problem for Pence is that he is stuck with this looming Trump shadow over his shoulder,” he said. “Every time he tries to explain some conservative ideal, it’s almost with the caveat that we want to do this, but we also have Donald Trump to do this.”Filipiak said that this ‘shadow’ of Trump allowed Kaine to go on the attack throughout the course of the debate.“Kaine had all these things in his arsenal ahead of time on how [Trump’s views represent] extremism, not even conservative extremism but just extremism,” FIlipiak said.Tags: Donald Trump, hillary clinton, Mike Pence, Tim Kaine, vice presidential debatelast_img read more

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Family owned hair salon offers haircuts to Notre Dame community

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Zak Emmons The University Hair Stylists, in the basement of the LaFortune Student Center, is run as a family business by the Emmons family. Jeff Emmon’s founded the salon in 1979. His son Zak is the current owner.“Years before I was born, he got his cosmetology license and was doing hair at a place off campus and happened to cut a couple of gentlemen’s hair who were working in the administration here,” Emmons said. “ … They were like, ‘Hey Jeff, I’m thinking about opening up like a salon, like, you know, the barbershop or salon. We’re interviewing potential proprietors, and you should throw your hat in the ring.’ So he did, and he had the references, so he got the space. Basically they just threw up a wall in the middle the barbershop in Badin Hall and it kind of grew from that.”Since Notre Dame had opened its doors to women for the first time in 1972, Zak Emmons said this change and addition of the salon was needed to fulfill the changing needs of the University.Zak Emmons did not always know he wanted to take over his father’s business and initially used doing hair as a way to put off going to college. Growing up, he frequently worked in the salon, and about 10 years ago officially purchased the business from his father.When LaFortune was being redone in the mid 1980s, University Hair Stylists was able to expand when it moved to the space it now occupies across from Pizza Hut and Taco Bell in the basement. However, Emmons said even with the normal change that comes with an establishment, the salon still primarily cuts men’s hair.“One thing that’s similar is that we still do more guys’ hair,” Emmons said. “We’re a barbershop that does color and eyebrow wax and that sort of thing … about 75 percent of our business is still guys. That’s kind of one thing that’s never changed I suppose. I would say like every year we probably get a little more of a female clientele.”According to Zak Emmons, there are nine employees that currently work at University Hair Stylists, many of whom have varying talents other than giving a simple haircut. He said the business does not have much turnover, and a handful of employees have been with the business for over a decade. Emmons also has three sisters, two of whom have worked in the salon at varying points.“We’re in this interesting spot and conundrum where it’s hard to do both really well or at least appeal to both really well as far as like offering certain services,” he said. “We’re a barbershop by and large, but we do have some talent. For example, Diana [Roop] does excellent updos for weddings and stuff. In a dream world, I’d love to have a dedicated salon space and more of a haircut and barbershop space as well so you could have a little more privacy.”Roop, who has worked for University Hair Stylists for 26 years, said working on a university campus differs from working in a normal salon because of the constant changes in clientele.“I would say our clientele changes a lot more over the years,” she said. “While you get new students every year, every four years your students are gone. So you lose students, and that’s kind of sad because you don’t keep track of them as long, but it also keeps our clientele young and fresh.”Roop cited a change in what people want from getting their hair cut as a help in the salon’s growth over the years.“We have definitely picked up business over the years. I think more students are used to stylists and not just barbers, so that’s helped us improve,” Roop said.Zak Emmons also said working on a university campus is a unique experience, and that it feels like an “oasis.”“I love being on campus, especially coming from South Bend, a smallish Midwest sort of community. It’s pretty homogenized,” he said. “Especially with grad students or teachers, you end up getting to know them for like five, six, 10 years. You just end up knowing their names and you talk about kids and family and that sort of stuff. I just think it’s super interesting and fascinating to be here in this oasis of culture in South Bend that I would never have experienced otherwise.”Tags: LaFortune Student Center, LaFun, University Hair Stylists Cutting hair ran in the family for Zak Emmons, who has been the owner of University Hair Stylists in the basement of LaFortune Student Center for the last decade. University Hair Stylists, in some form, has been around for about 39 years and was originally owned by Emmons’ father, Jeff Emmons, who opened the salon in 1979.Jeff Emmons, who is currently described by his son as being “by and large mostly retired” from working at the salon, happened upon the Notre Dame position when he was cutting the hair of a couple Notre Dame faculty who were trying to find someone to open a salon alongside the existing barbershop in Badin Hall that would cater to both men and women.last_img read more

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ND leprechaun mascot addresses racist Twitter comments

first_imgEmma Farnan | The Observer Sam Jackson as one of the ND leprechaun mascots at the first Notre Dame football game of the 2019 season.“Like it or not, this guy right here is still one of your Notre Dame leprechauns!” Jackson tweeted. “How about we use this negative energy to bring us together this season? See y’all next game.”Jackson, along with juniors Conal Fagan and Lynnette Wukie, was chosen in the spring to represent the University’s mascot for the upcoming year. Jackson and Wukie are the second and third African Americans to serve as the leprechaun, and Wukie is the University’s first female leprechaun. The trio is the most diverse group of leprechauns picked since the leprechaun became the official mascot in 1965.Following the appointment, Jackson said in April that he looked to alumnus Michael Brown (’01) – the University’s first African American leprechaun – to pursue the mascot role, and he sees his position as the leprechaun as a way for him make his mark on the University.“When I first came here, I was a big Notre Dame fan, but I didn’t have the history or legacy that my friends did,” Jackson said at the time. “Being able to make my own experiences and memories here at this University and to be able to represent it — especially as a senior — is just the best feeling. I feel like I have solidified my presence and voice, and am now etching it into the very fabric of the University.”Tags: African American leprechaun, leprechaun, Michael Brown, racist, Samuel B. Jackson Senior Samuel B. Jackson, one of the University’s three leprechaun mascots and only the second African American to ever serve in the role, urged Irish fans to come together Tuesday after receiving racist criticism for being chosen to represent Notre Dame this year.Dave Portnoy, the founder of Barstool Sports, a sports and culture blog, posted a photo of Jackson at Monday night’s game along with photos of three white leprechauns on his Twitter account.“You know what is sad?” Portnoy tweeted Sept 2. “Internet outrage culture has made me afraid to say that I think the ND mascot should always be a midget looking ginger. So I’m just not gonna say it.”The following day Jackson addressed the viral tweet and ensuing comments by Portnoy’s followers by posting on his own Twitter account.last_img read more

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Senate appoints Executive Council nominations, passes resolution supporting No Shave November

first_imgThe Notre Dame student senate met Wednesday to decide on the nomination of two new members to the Student Executive Cabinet for the remainder of the 2019-2020 Academic term. Student Body President Elizabeth Boyle, a senior, and Student Body Vice President Patrick McGuire, a junior, were patrons of the nominations.The nominated candidates were Katherine Wallace for director of academic affairs and Tiffanie Cappello-Lee for press secretary & director of communications. McGuire read the cases to be made for each of the candidates.“We have selected Katherine to be the director of academic affairs because she is a passionate, committed, experienced and talented student leader who serves with focus and enthusiasm,” McGuire said. “Katherine is a current member of the Academic Affairs Department who brings Executive Cabinet leadership experience as the director of athletics emeritus. Katherine, a member of the Notre Dame fencing team, is also a member of the Student-Athlete Advisory Council. She has served as a McWell Thrive leader and is a Notre Dame Monogram recipient. Katherine has performed in each of these roles with exceptional skill, diligence and leadership capability.”As Wallace was not present at the meeting due to a scheduling conflict, the Senate could not ask her any questions directly. McGuire addressed the potential concern about her absence by saying she would be available over email and a deputy director will later be appointed as well.“[I’ve] also had some good discussions about the fact that it’s important for a director to be at Senate which is a very genuine and important concern,” McGuire said. “Good thing is, even if in the future Catherine is unable to make meetings because of practice, we are also appointing a deputy director of Academic Affairs learners, so, if something like this were to happen again, there would still be representation from the department.”The Senate quickly moved through Wallace’s nomination and confirmed her. They then moved onto the next candidate, Cappello-Lee.“[Cappello-Lee] has a deep dedication to service, justice and excellence,” McGuire said. “On campus, Tiffanie [Cappello-Lee] has served as a research assistant in Dr. Michale Ferdig’s malaria genetics and genomics research lab and a co-coordinator for the Global Health Conference. Tiffanie [Cappello-Lee] is a Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar, a member of the Glynn Family Honors Program, and a Sorin Fellow in the Center for Ethics and Culture.”Beyond campus, Cappello-Lee does pro-bono consulting for Mercy Homes for Boys and Girls, conducted research on the environmental impact of dietary changes in China and water pollution’s impact on health in Hong Kong, and has conducted extensive research in Ottawa and Santiago, Chile, McGuire said.“She has also interned at the management consulting firm AArete,” he said. “Through these experiences, she has gained and honed her skills of marketing, team building, research, writing, and consulting — all skills that will prove essential to her role as press secretary and director of communications.”Cappello-Lee was present at the meeting, and Senate only had one question. Sam Cannova, junior class council president, wanted to gauge her decision-making process in a very specific, high-stress environment.“As I’m sure we all know, Notre Dame lies on the Indiana fault line,” Cannova said. “We have a Radiation Laboratory on campus. Further, one of the typical roles with the press secretary and director of communications is to cover all sorts of news. One of the frequent stories usually takes Elizabeth and a director of comms slash press secretary to the Radiation Laboratory. So, in the event that you were in the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory with Elizabeth [Boyle] and Pat[rick McGuire], and an earthquake occurs, in which the exits are just like blocked, ceiling falls down, and you can’t get out, and there’s a radiation leak, but there are only two hazmat suits. What do you do?”After the audible laughter in the room had died down, Cappello-Lee answered the question.“That’s a very important question and very realistic,” Cappello-Lee said. “Ultimately, I would just give it to Elizabeth and Pat[rick], like that’s the type of person I am, and since they are good people, I’d probably want to save them.”There were no more questions regarding her nomination, and after she exited the room, the Senate confirmed her nomination.Following the nominations, the Senate heard from director of department of community and engagement director, senior Alex Yom, about promoting this year’s department events, including Converge.“So far this year, I’m sure you’ve all seen the South Bend adventure guide being posted,” Yom said. “So we’re trying to give more access for students of all years to understand the different restaurants and things to do in South Bend. In terms of civic engagement, we’re proud to have done the Converge kickoff, which had over 200 signups this year matching people from different political views.Yom said the department also worked with ND Votes on a voter registration competition, registering over 1,200 people across campus. Next semester, the department’s focus is will be on ensuring students have access to volunteering and internships in South Bend.“So we’ll be putting on the social concerns fair with the Center for Social Concerns …  and then the big idea actually that we’re all really excited about because the debate is going to be held on campus next year,” Yom said. “… We’re really excited to put together sort of like this debate facilitator model, building off of the success of Converge. We’re hoping [to] pair different dorms together and have debate facilitators trained in each dorm pairing, and basically have a sort of debate model up until the actual presidential debate next fall. So the Senate would be a huge help to publicize this in your respective residence halls and trying to recruit people.”Following the talk from Yom, the Senate voted to move a resolution recognizing and encouraging No Shave November to the floor. Sam Delmer, a sophomore senator from the Dillon community in Baumer Hall, was one of the patrons and presented the bill to the Senate.“The goal of No Shave November is to grow awareness by embracing our hair, which many cancer patients lose, and letting it grow wild and free,” Delmer said. “Members of the University community may participate by growing a beard, cultivating a mustache, letting those legs go natural … participation is by no means obligatory, but the recognition of the program offers important recognition of our community’s allyship with cancer patients and their families.”There were not many concerns with the resolution, but some wondered if the bill would be discriminatory against hairless people.“Delmer said the bill would not be discriminatory because shaving itself is the concern and not shaving because one does not have any hair to shave is acceptable,” he said.Following these brief concerns, the Senate motioned for the end of debate and passed the resolution.Tags: student senatelast_img read more

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Small Touches Can Make a Big Impact on Your Home’s Interior Design

first_img • Layered Look: Combining a range of finishes can give you a layered effect, which is visually interesting. Avoid fittings that are identical or match everything in the room, says Cohler.• Cabinets: When it comes to decorative hardware for cabinets, a coordinated look is still the most popular among homeowners. For the more adventurous, try a modified mixing of hardware. For instance, you can have all your wall cupboards fitted with brass and all the base cabinets and drawers with copper hardware.• Don’t get bored: Fashion conscious homeowners should consider keeping two sets of cabinet hardware on hand and change them every other year to keep the look fresh. Swapping them out is simple, and just requires a screwdriver.• Make it Easy: For many people, choosing cabinet hardware can be confusing and arbitrary. However, narrowing your search to a curated collection can make the process easier. For example, AmerockNOW curated by Cohler, captures regional style trends across the country, with refreshed styles and new finishes that blend with both traditionally styled interiors and more contemporary decors.  (StatePoint) For homeowners looking to make a big interior design splash while staying on-trend, it’s all about focusing on little touches, say experts.“You may not think much about the knobs and handles on your kitchen and bathroom cabinets, credenzas and other furnishings, but these small touches can be the jewelry of your home and are an inexpensive yet important design remodel,” says acclaimed designer, Eric Cohler, who has been listed as a top international designer by House Beautiful and Elle Décor magazines.Want to update or coordinate the entire look and feel of your home? Cohler is offering some tips: • Think Metal: Metals are a hot trend — from artisanal coppers to sassy bronzes and from cool nickel to sharp stainless steel. While metallic finishes may already be peppered throughout your home on appliances, plumbing fixtures and even textiles, don’t forget that you can subtly follow the metal trend by including the look on cabinetry door pulls, furniture hardware and even hinges. It adds just the right amount of polish and elegance to a room without being too opulent.• Warmth: Copper, along with its chromatic cousins — brass, bronze and gold — brings a sense of warmth to the home. Pair it with natural wood, leather or glass to create a calm, elegant impression in any environment. Avoid mixing copper too much with primary colors.For example, if you’re looking for a warm and rustic surface with dark undertones, Cohler recommends considering knobs, handles and hinges with a Brushed Copper finish, available from such cabinet hardware brands as Amerock Hardware. A copper finish has the versatility to blend with both modern and traditional décor.center_img More information about new products, as well as design tips and regional trends can be found at www.Amerock.com.From functional hinges and screws to decorative knobs and backplates, updating small details throughout your home is a great avenue for personal expression and trend-setting.last_img read more

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SOFTBALL: Napoli becomes Lamar’s all-time strikeout leader

first_imgLamar sports informationBEAUMONT – Laura Napoli became Lamar’s all-time strikeout leader Friday night, but the Cardinals dropped both ends of a Southland Conference doubleheader to the visiting McNeese State Cowgirls by scores of 6-4 and 5-2.Napoli struck out three in the opener to boost her career total to 271, surpassing the previous record of 269 held by Ciara Luna.With the losses, LU (24-23 overall, 9-11 SLC) fell one game behind Sam Houston State for eighth place, and the final spot in next month’s Southland Conference Tournament. The Bearkats split a doubleheader at Abilene Christian on Friday. McNeese improved to 32-16 overall and 14-6 in the conference to maintain a share of the conference lead.Game 1Kelly Meeuwsen became just the second Cardinal in program history to drive in 100 runs, but the Cardinals squandered a 3-0 led, allowing six runs over the final two innings.Game 2 Meeuwsen and Kendall Talley had two hits for the Cardinals, but the Cardinals couldn’t dig themselves out of an early 4-0 hole.PROMOTIONSToday is Hometown Heroes Day, with all first responders and active or former military personnel receiving free admission when they wear their uniform or present a valid ID at the ticket window.last_img read more

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